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Techie People: Question: BCC prevents phishing?

 
 
Reply Sat 22 Feb, 2014 08:37 am
I have friends who send me emails with three dozen email addresses in the TO: line. I, personally, do not like my address exposed to all the others in a group that I haven't chosen, but I grit my teeth and carry on.
Now comes another friend of mine who says that the practice of shoving every body onto that TO: line makes it easier for hackers to steal your address.

He says putting everybody on the BCC: line prevents or at least makes it more difficult for someone to phish your address.

I do that anyway just because I like to keep a bit of privacy for myself and others, but .....is he right? Is BBC: any help against phishing/hacking whatever.??
Thanks for your replies.

Joe(I once got an email with 150 addresses announcing the birth of puppies)Nation
 
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Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Feb, 2014 05:46 pm
@Joe Nation,
I am not a techie; however, I have prevented the problem by just not having friends. Minor acquaintenships are the best I can offer anyone. Those "entangling friendships" resulted in WWI, I thought? And emails from minor acquaintenships is just an oxymoron. Like they say in Hawaii, give me spam.
Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Sat 22 Feb, 2014 09:57 pm
@Foofie,
Well....Foofie, as always, your answer was a big help to me. I did not know that they said that about spam in Hawaii. (Verification has not yet arrived.)

You are to be admired in your pursuit of friendlessness, if you continue on this path you can be assured that your funeral will be attended by some local fundamentalist preacher, the funeral parlor's wife and two people who wandered in from the overcrowded service across the hall.

Meanwhile, I've hacked into your email account and sold your address to the Russians, the Bulgarians, two set of Nigerians using the same set of aliases and a fat guy who works out of Boca in Florida.

Joe(Just to keep you busy)Nation
jespah
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 09:25 am
@Joe Nation,
It doesn't prevent phishing. It just keeps your email address private from other people in the send list when the sender sends a mass email to a lot of addresses.

Phishing is mainly sent to more or less random emails, or to lists that are purchased by spammers. Ever get spam for, say, the First National Bank of Idaho, even if you've never been to Idaho? This is pretty standard phishing behavior. It's a blanket send to as many addresses as possible, hoping that a small fraction of a percent will bite.

There may be some logic applied, e. g. to letter sequences that make sense in English, such as names like Susan or Michael, as those are more likely to be a part of email addresses than random sequences like ghigjfgri93klsdfd.
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 09:29 am
@jespah,
Thanks.

Joe(I prefer to be hidden from any TO list)Nation
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 09:36 am
@Joe Nation,
/does the red ribbon dance/

0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 02:07 pm
Using CC when BCC would have been wiser (or vice-versa) has led to many awkward situations e.g. breaches of privacy, upset colleagues, loss of business etc. With BCC each recipient is unaware whether (or how many) other people have also been sent the email. With CC there is a list in plain sight. If a recipient of a BCC email accidentally (or stupidly) hits "reply to all" they are replying to an unknown number of people whose identities they do not know, and at the same time revealing that they themselves were blind copied.


0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 02:51 pm
@Joe Nation,
Joe Nation wrote:

Well....Foofie, as always, your answer was a big help to me. I did not know that they said that about spam in Hawaii. (Verification has not yet arrived.)

You are to be admired in your pursuit of friendlessness, if you continue on this path you can be assured that your funeral will be attended by some local fundamentalist preacher, the funeral parlor's wife and two people who wandered in from the overcrowded service across the hall.

Meanwhile, I've hacked into your email account and sold your address to the Russians, the Bulgarians, two set of Nigerians using the same set of aliases and a fat guy who works out of Boca in Florida.

Joe(Just to keep you busy)Nation


It was a double entendre. In Hawaii they like to eat Spam, the food in a can.

My funeral might not even be attended by the folks you mention. That is a non-sequitur. People who I do not even know, on other sides of the planet perhaps, are carrying partial replicas of my DNA, and do not know the reasons for their constitutional ennui. I hold the secret to their frustrations, having spent decades learning the evolution of my DNA. I am babbling now, but that is what I do best.

contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 03:36 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
In Hawaii they like to eat Spam, the food in a can.


This is one of my occasional guilty pleasures. Fried in slices with fried eggs and a bottle of Tabasco on the table. I know it is neither Halal nor kosher, but I think God will judge me on other things.

Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Feb, 2014 07:52 pm
@contrex,
Foofie too.

What meat's a treat? In Korea, it's Spam
Stroll into an expensive department store and walk straight past the $180 watermelon with a ribbon twirled just so around its stem. Don't bother with the...

By Barbara Demick
Los Angeles Times
SEOUL, South Korea — Stroll into an expensive department store and walk straight past the $180 watermelon with a ribbon twirled just so around its stem. Don't bother with the tea in a butterfly-shaped tin for $153, or with the gift boxes of Belgian chocolates or French cheeses.

If you're looking for a gift that bespeaks elegance and taste, you might try Spam. The luncheon meat might be the subject of satire in the United States, but in South Korea it is positively classy.

With $136 million in sales, South Korea is the largest market in the world outside the United States for Spam. But here, the pink luncheon meat with its gelatinous shell is deemed too nice to buy for oneself, and 40 percent of the Spam sold here is in the form of gifts.

Especially during the holidays, you can see the blue-and-yellow cans neatly stacked in the aisles of the better stores. Koreans are passionate about packaging and so the Spam often comes wrapped in boxed sets.

"Spam really is a luxury item," said Han Geun Rae, 43, a fashion buyer who was loading gift boxes of Spam into a cart at Shinseyge department store in advance of the recent Chusok holiday.

Chusok is the Korean equivalent of Thanksgiving, the biggest gift-giving occasion of the year here. On this one holiday alone, Korean distributor CJ Corp. estimates, 8 million cans change hands.

Han's intended recipients were her employees, among them a young single man and a married woman with children. "Everybody loves it. It is so easy and convenient," she said.

Han expected that she would get her own complement of Spam as well — in past Chusok seasons, about one out of three gifts she received was a food set that contained at least one can of Spam.

"My children are in high school and they love it. I cook it in 'jjigae' stew with kimchi."

"It goes very nicely with red wine," added another shopper, Kim Hwa Yeon, 44, a stockbroker who said she was buying for clients.

Spam's success in Korea is one of those cultural mysteries — a bit like the reverence for comedian Jerry Lewis in France — where an image is actually improved in translation. Koreans take their Spam seriously and in fact seem mystified about why it is a subject of parody among Americans.

Not coincidentally, Spam also is popular in Hawaii, the Philippines, Okinawa, Guam and Saipan, all places with a history of U.S. military presence. The "Miracle Meat in a Can," as it was touted after its launch in 1937, was a staple of the military diet during World War II and the 1950-1953 Korean War.


Until 1987, Koreans had to buy black-market cans of Spam that were diverted from U.S. military bases. Then CJ Corp. bought the rights from Hormel and began producing its own version of Spam at a factory south of Seoul.

In the postwar years, Spam was a special treat for Koreans who could rarely afford meat and had no refrigeration at home. It is harder to explain Spam's popularity today in the world's 11th-largest economy, where there is no shortage of fresh meat and things associated with the U.S. military are considered low-class.

Koreans don't eat Spam in sandwiches as Americans do but usually eat it fried with rice or in a soup or stew.
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