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6000W cooktop circuit

 
 
Reply Tue 11 Feb, 2014 05:18 pm
I have a 32A circuit breaker 4mm cable to my 2380W oven. I would like to install a 6000W induction cooktop. I also have a 32A sub circuit with a 20A circuit breaker that was for an air con. How should this be wired and protected? Can both appliances be on the existing oven circ? Or put the cooktop on the existing wiring, and change the oven to the air con circuit? Thanks
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 2,646 • Replies: 4
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Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Feb, 2014 06:35 pm
@1hairycanary,
If I were in the same situation, I'd hire a licensed electrician. It's safer and protects your property as well as your safety. Why take such a gamble?
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 03:42 pm
@1hairycanary,
Quote:
I have a 32A circuit breaker 4mm cable to my 2380W oven. I would like to install a 6000W induction cooktop.
Sorry Hairy, no offense, I realize how complicated English seems, but it's not clear to what extent the cooktop increases the unit's total consumption. I'd guess then to about 8400 w

Quote:
I also have a 32A sub circuit with a 20A circuit breaker that was for an air con.
Some of us unfamiliar with the term "sub circuit" are uncertain where exactly it's connected. Incidentally you haven't specified the voltage in either case

Quote:
How should this be wired and protected?
Very unsure because of above uncertainties, the source of power, its voltage; but now I'm assuming 220 v with the two breakers coming off single bus capable of 52A min

Quote:
Can both appliances be on the existing oven circ?
Not sure Hairy what you mean by "both appliances." Clearly one is the existing oven but then the other must be the cooktop. If by the "existing" circuit you're referring to the 32A line then no of course not, unless your inference is 440v, in which case ignore this entire posting)

Quote:
Or put the cooktop [only] on the existing wiring,
At 220 v a 32A breaker will support about 7 kw; pushing your luck a little but my guess it's okay

Quote:
...and change the oven to the air con circuit?
Of course at 220 v, 20A is 4400 w which should easily handle the oven, although some might say that's overprotection

However there are still issues pending. For instance I'm wondering if you had intended one breaker to be downstream of the other, an absolute no-no as I understand it

As for wire size, etc, of course Google

Quote:
Thanks
You're welcome though Hairy

Forgive pun
0 Replies
 
magnocrat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Jan, 2015 04:01 am
The thing to remember in all cases is the breaker protects the wire from overload not the appliance.
Cookers are allowed diversity since they are never totally swiched on, but once again its the cable that matters if most cookers were at full load the breaker would go.
0 Replies
 
carloslebaron
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Jan, 2015 09:06 am
@1hairycanary,
The only part I'm concerned is the size of the wiring. You must try to read the printed letters and numbers on the cable to check its size. And from here, to check how much load can handle.

I never heard of a 4mm wire (diameter of the copper/metal conductor?).

I guess that one can't lean of such a diameter size because a smaller diameter of copper cable can hold more amperage than a similar diameter aluminum cable.

You better check the size of the cable in better technical terms, unless such is how it is labeled at your place... still, you also check what kind of metal is the conductor for the appliances.
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