4
   

Is there a relativist in the crowd

 
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 03:34 pm
@dalehileman,
Is this what you've been talking about?
Wiki wrote:
In physics, the twin paradox is a thought experiment in special relativity involving identical twins, one of whom makes a journey into space in a high-speed rocket and returns home to find that the twin who remained on Earth has aged more. This result appears puzzling because each twin sees the other twin as traveling, and so, according to an incorrect naive application of time dilation, each should paradoxically find the other to have aged more slowly. However, this scenario can be resolved within the standard framework of special relativity (because the twins are not equivalent; the space twin experienced additional, asymmetrical acceleration when switching direction to return home), and therefore is not a paradox in the sense of a logical contradiction.
Starting with Paul Langevin in 1911, there have been numerous explanations of this paradox, many based upon there being no contradiction because there is no symmetry—only one twin has undergone acceleration and deceleration, thus differentiating the two cases. Max von Laue argued in 1913 that since the traveling twin must be in two separate inertial frames, one on the way out and another on the way back, this frame switch is the reason for the aging difference, not the acceleration per se. Explanations put forth by Albert Einstein and Max Born invoked gravitational time dilation to explain the aging as a direct effect of acceleration.

dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 03:57 pm
@rosborne979,
Quote:
Is this what you've been talking about?
Not specifically Ros but thanks anyhow. I was speaking mainly of special relativity's concept of taad

Eg, that's Al's assumption for instance that Martha's clock is reading 12:05. But when we get into Marty's and Isaac's view, things get more complicated

However for purposes of further speculation I've always been intrigued about the effect of acceleration on the traveler's trip. As I recall, though don't quote me, there's still some controversy in this realm. Troubling some is the notion that to Isaac, firing his rocket instantly advances Martha's time from 12:00 to 12:05

….one of the various relativistic phenomena my crazy theory about the velocity of light hopes to resolve; but in the meanwhile I'm still baffled by all the confusion about my description of classical relativity
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 05:02 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
Please please, isn't there a relativist in the crowd
There are several relativists in the crowd. Good ones. None of them can tell what the heck you are talking about.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 05:31 pm
@dalehileman,
Here, study these two links, then ask any questions:

http://galileoandeinstein.physics.virginia.edu/lectures/time_dil.html

http://galileoandeinstein.physics.virginia.edu/lectures/sreltwins.html

All you have to do is click on them. Then Read and Think.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 06:26 pm
@rosborne979,
Alas my apologies to all

Thanks Ros for the links

In turn you might find Marder et al interesting
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Feb, 2014 06:27 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Quote:
Just because you can find one nutcase, doesn't mean anything……. You're not qualified to have an opinion.
Okay Bran but specifically what aspect of "my opinion" do you refer

You're not qualified to have any opinion whatever on a technical subject which you haven't studied. You think you can read a few medical books on your own and start treating patients? All your narratives are so confused and rife with implicit misconceptions that it's a lot of work to drag out enough facts to discuss.
0 Replies
 
 

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