18
   

Sleeping Rosetta spacecraft wakes up for comet rendezvous

 
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2015 09:44 pm
I think we just need to send somebody up there and scootch it over a few feet.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2015 04:11 am
Under those conditions, "ice" doesn't melt, it sublimates. That means it goes directly from a solid to a gas. You would get out-gassing, like little rockets in the places at which it occurs. There's no way of knowing (yet) how much of an effect that will have.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 04:44 am
@Setanta,
Philae probe: Rosetta scientists says lander's material is 'amazingly exciting'
European Space Agency scientists say no further contact has been made with the Philae probe since it ‘woke up’ to send messages from a comet
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 04:48 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Rosetta space orbiter to be moved closer to Philae lander comet
Quote:
The Rosetta space orbiter is to be moved closer to the comet hosting the pioneering Philae lander to establish a better with link the probe after it sent back signals last weekend, the European Space Agency has announced.

In a briefing on the mission at the Paris air show, the agency confirmed there had been no contact with the solar-powered probe since its surprise reactivation over the weekend when it signalled to its orbiting mothership Rosetta.

The agency’s scientists and engineers gave details of how the Rosetta trajectory has been changed to “optimise the opportunities for lander-to-orbiter communication”.

Two operations on Wednesday and on Saturday, referred to as “dog-leg” burns, will bring the orbiter to a distance of 180km from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko – more than 40km closer than its previous trajectory.

“The key here is to maximise the communication with Philae,” Elsa Montagnon, Rosetta’s deputy flight director told the briefing. She explained that if the orbiter got too close it would shut down because of dust thrown up in the comet’s wake. She likened the mission to driving through a snow storm.

The Philae probe made contact with agency for the first time in seven months on Saturday, and has sent back hundreds of packages of valuable data. It had been silent since a partially botched landing last November.

If more contact can be established the probe will able to send back more data than if it had landed in the spot it was meant to, scientists said.

Montagnon confirmed that there was contact for 85 seconds on Saturday night. The comet then made one revolution in which there was no contact, but then a further three 10-second bursts were received on Sunday evening, she said.

Jean-Pierre Bibring, the lead scientist on the project, told the briefing that the mission had already been a success because it had been so unexpected and challenged existing paradigms. He said the mission could now “go beyond expectations”, if longer periods of contact were made with the probe.

He said the probe’s reawakening showed it survived temperatures of minus 150 degrees. He acknowledged that the probe would probably have overheated if it had not landed under the shadow of an area of the comet identified by the scientists as the “Perihelion cliff”. He said: “Although we are in shadow we survived and that is really amazingly fantastic.”

Bibring said that the material already gathered from the lander is “amazingly exciting” because it gives detail of the material that modelled the solar system.

He said: “We have got still some fine-tuning to make. But essentially now we are in a position not only to wake up but to resume science to an extent that might go beyond our expectation.”

The Rosetta orbit has picked up “bizarre pits” on the surface of the 4km wide comet, senior scientist Mark McCaughrean told the briefing. “These pits are alive – we see material flowing out, this is not a dead body at all. Fantastic jets emerge even in the darkness,” he said.

The agency reckons there is a great chance of contact with the probe as the comet’s orbit reaches its closest point to the sun this August.

McCaughrean said: “This extraordinary journey is by no means over. We are not at a dead object, we are at a living breathing dragon of a comet, which is coming to life as we come closer to the sun.”

Bibring added: “The dream that we put together is still there because the fact that Philae not only woke up but gave a signal has opened new excitement to complete the mission and possibly go beyond it.”
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 04:53 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I'm going to be on the edge of my seat until August... http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb192/DinahFyre/rockingchair2.gif
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  5  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 04:58 am
Are the rumours true that McDonald's are sponsoring another mission to join up with Philae on that comet, and that their craft is going to be called 'O Fish' ?












Sorry.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jun, 2015 05:04 am
@Lordyaswas,
Oh, good lard. When that finally stuck me...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2015 11:34 pm
Philae has phoned home again.

Quote:
The team at the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) received data from the Philae lander for the third time on 19 June 2015. Between 15:20 and 15:39 CEST, Philae sent 185 data packets. "Among other things, we have received updated status information," says Michael Maibaum, a systems engineer at the DLR Lander Control Center (LCC) in Cologne and Deputy Operations Manager. "At present, the lander is operating at a temperature of zero degrees Celsius, which means that the battery is now warm enough to store energy. This means that Philae will also be able to work during the comet's night, regardless of solar illumination." In the 19 minutes of transmission, the lander sent data recorded last week; from this, the engineers determined that the amount of sunlight has increased: "More solar panels were illuminated; at the end of contact, four of Philae's panels were receiving energy". There were a number of interruptions in the connection, but it was otherwise stable over a longer period for the first time. “The contact has confirmed that Philae is doing very well.”
Source
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 12:44 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The probe said it had 8,000 data packets when it contacted us, 300 downloaded then, 185 this time....at this rate most of the work is never going to get transmitted.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 03:45 am
@hawkeye10,
I'm sure, you would have done it better.

hawkeye10 wrote:
The probe said it had 8,000 data packets when it contacted us,
You work in Darmstadt now?
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 05:29 am
@hawkeye10,
Hawkeye, Every dire prediction you have made on this thread has turned out to be false. It is like this little lander is working extra hard to prove you wrong.

I hope NASA appreciates you.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 05:49 am
If Philae averages 200 packets a day, it will finish it's transmission in under 40 days. There are a lot more than 40 days left on this mission.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 11:14 am
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

Hawkeye, Every dire prediction you have made on this thread has turned out to be false. It is like this little lander is working extra hard to prove you wrong.

I hope NASA appreciates you.


Hawkeye has not made any predictions at all in this thread, much less dire ones. Lets attempt to speak truth MKay?
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 11:20 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

If Philae averages 200 packets a day, it will finish it's transmission in under 40 days. There are a lot more than 40 days left on this mission.

One: your numbers assume that the lander generates no new data, which would mean that it is dead and which also means that it could not transmit

two: we dont know how long the probe and orbiter will work

three: the tiny number of 185 packets was accomplished AFTER we moved the orbiter into a more dangerous position in the desperate attempt to upload data from the lander before it dies. And lets keep in mind that this operation was done even though we cant figure out where the little ****** is, which kinda sounds like a design flaw to me.

four: the 185 packets took a long time to transmit, which means that the link was of very poor quality.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 11:52 am
@hawkeye10,
Your four points assume that the scientists don't know what they are doing.


http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2015/06171501-philae-is-awake-whats-next.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

The best time for power will be in August.
The mission was expected to last through Dec of 2015 and will probably be extended well in to 2016.
The orbiter is not moved into a dangerous position. They are attempting to optimize without putting it in too much danger. It can move closer later in the mission.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 12:04 pm
@parados,
Quote:
The best time for power will be in August

Unknown, because we dont know how much all of the contaminants that will be leaving the icy chunk will inhibit the solar cells, and we dont know when or even iff the upper operational temperatures of the probe and orbiter will be reached

Quote:
The mission was expected to last through Dec of 2015 and will probably be extended well in to 2016.
The mission of the probe was supposed to be over months ago, had they been able to land this thing as planned it would long ago had gotten too hot to operate. Then again had it landed were it was supposed to we likely would have had a lot of data sent back to Earth. you know the mission, which may or may not ever get accomplished. Considering that we dont know where the probe is and have gotten only 185 packets out of it in over a weeks time makes any talk of completing the mission on par with proclaiming the return of Jesus I think....it could happen but I will not hold my breath.

Quote:
The orbiter is not moved into a dangerous position.
In that case y ou might want to get with Darmstadt and enquire as to why they claimed the move put the orbiter in more danger. Me having seen pictures of comet tails as they go around the sun took this proclamation without doubt.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 12:06 pm
@hawkeye10,
It seems, you are talking about something different to what I had thought.

I get my information from the Rosetta Lander Control Center at the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR).
And that's situated in the Microgravity User Support Center (MUSC) in Cologne. (The MUSC runs two control centers, the PHILAE Control Center [LCC] and the ISS Control Center for facility operations on board the International Space Station [ISS]. The PHILAE team at LCC is responsible for the control and operation of the Lander.)
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 01:03 pm
Speculation: I expect that this probe was supposed to be long done with its work because as the tail develops it gets increasingly difficult for the tiny low power probe to link with the orbiter. Given how little data we have been able to retrieve in the last week I have to wonder if there is much of anything that we will get. The sacrifices made to avoid launching a nuclear reactor again seems to be what has caused the doom of the mission..... had this probe been nuclear powered all of the problems that have prevented the probe from both working and communicating earlier would have been prevented. Now it might be too late.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 03:25 pm
@hawkeye10,
First you refer to yourself in the second person (we}, the in the third person (speaking about what "Hawkeye" has done), and now in the second person again. You are no part of the ESA, you have no place to speak about what "we" have done.

I made no assumptions about whether or not Philae will produce new data--as the batteries are further charged, the lander, unlike "Hawkeye," will undoubtedly be able to do more than one thing at a time. No mission is ever sent out knowing that all its systems will work indefinitely.

You other remarks are typical Whackeye idiocy, based on nothing more than your undying urge to appear to be sophisticated and knowing, a pose which never fools anyone around here.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2015 03:39 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
First you refer to yourself in the second person (we}, the in the third person (speaking about what "Hawkeye" has done), and now in the second person again. You are no part of the ESA, you have no place to speak about what "we" have done.


Probes sent by the Earth Species Homo sapiens represent all of us, not just the ones who legally own or control them. And we will all suffer the benefits or harm that comes from these efforts. You are a victim of small thinking here.
 

Related Topics

New Propulsion, the "EM Drive" - Question by TomTomBinks
The Science Thread - Discussion by Wilso
Why do people deny evolution? - Question by JimmyJ
Are we alone in the universe? - Discussion by Jpsy
Fake Science Journals - Discussion by rosborne979
Controvertial "Proof" of Multiverse! - Discussion by littlek
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/14/2019 at 12:54:52