5
   

Cosmic microwave background wmap

 
 
Linax13
 
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 10:51 am
I am unable to reconcile the Big Bang theory and the wmap. If space and time expanded at the very moment matter was created. The wmap which indicates the hot and cold spots, the microwave radiation from the entirety should have already been radiated out to the edge of spacetime at that time and earth in its composite star dust would still be part of the picture. How is it that we get the wmap radiations billions of years later?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,268 • Replies: 9
No top replies

 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 12:39 pm
@Linax13,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilkinson_Microwave_Anisotropy_Probe
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 12:49 pm
@Linax13,
Very interesting but now if you fellas could reduce the q to language suitable for your Average Clod (me), then maybe we could actually participate
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 01:14 pm
@dalehileman,
When you go to the link I provided (you did click on it, right?), it gives more explanation on the subject. I don't claim to understand it all or even most of it. My role is to facilitate by providing an informative link.

Perhaps Linax13 can provide some better explanation?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 02:58 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
(you did click on it, right?),
Yea Rag of course. However it was 'way 'bove my head
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 05:33 pm
@Linax13,
Linax13 wrote:
I am unable to reconcile the Big Bang theory and the wmap. If space and time expanded at the very moment matter was created. The wmap which indicates the hot and cold spots, the microwave radiation from the entirety should have already been radiated out to the edge of spacetime at that time and earth in its composite star dust would still be part of the picture. How is it that we get the wmap radiations billions of years later?

The microwave background radiation is not from the instant of the Big Bang, but from a time roughly 300,000 years after the Big Bang.

"The place that emanated the light that we are detecting" was a good distance away from us when that light was emanated.

The universe being truly infinite, it doesn't matter how far away you need to go in order to have light take a given amount of time to reach us. It's still a finite distance, more than easy enough to fit within the bounds of an infinite universe.


Trivia: The day will come when we can no longer see the background radiation. But not because of distance problems. Rather it will be because, as the expansion of the universe accelerates, eventually we will begin speeding away from the background radiation faster than the speed of light.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 06:38 pm
@dalehileman,
heres a pretty good explanation about the "Recombination phase" wherein they've calculated that the CMB began.
http://www.space.com/20330-cosmic-microwave-background-explained-infographic.html
0 Replies
 
Linax13
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 06:52 pm
@oralloy,
Thanks for the replies..

The wmap being microwave radiation, is possibly likely to have moved out faster out towards the outer space, much before dust started forming clusters and galaxies.. I assumed a unidirectional microwave radiation emanating out from the 300000 year old universe and would not be bounced back to be seen by the earth, a few billion years later,

For me two aspects of this are unresolved.

1. How big was the universe when it was 300000 years old. Was it infinite or is it the radial distance from the point of big bang to 3000000 light years?
2. Assuming no edge to the flat universe, where did the microwave radiation reflect back from?
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2014 08:18 pm
@Linax13,
You need to stop thinking about the initial heat flash as happening "somewhere else" and traveling to us. The background radiation happened everywhere including right inside of the space you occupy, because all of space is expanding, it isn't moving away from a single point.

The background microwave radiation we detect is simply the lowest wavelength of residual heat that we have the instrumentation to detect. It is ubiquitous in every direction not so much because it is "far away" but because it is old.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jan, 2014 11:57 am
@Linax13,
Quote:
...would not be bounced back to be seen by the earth
This confuses a bit Lin since it was my understanding that the notion of anything "bouncing" off the "edge" of the Universe makes no sense since it has no edge. I had supposed that something projected from a single loc would travel (for a long time to be sure) in a perfectly straight line, eventually returning from the other direction

But then I guess I'm still living in the 20th Century
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Where is the center? - Question by TomTomBinks
Life on Mars - Discussion by gungasnake
Safire - Discussion by gungasnake
galaxy pairs: colliding or separating? - Discussion by gungasnake
Universe not expanding - Discussion by gungasnake
comoving volume - Question by sarahf60
"Big Bang(TM)" Signal... - Discussion by gungasnake
Galactic Maelstrom - Discussion by gungasnake
More strings of galaxies - Discussion by gungasnake
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Cosmic microwave background wmap
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/22/2021 at 05:24:54