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Canada Recommends Fewer Mammograms

 
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 09:16 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

Since many German women, based on their hereditary genome, are more than a little zaftig (Yiddish for plump) , is there a high rate of breast cancer?


First of all ,I don't know anything about cancer of the breast in German women and I would never go to Wikipedia for that information.

Why are you commenting on the "German genome"? I don't recall any recently published info on the genome of German women as it relates to their zaftig ( if such exists).

As far as weight is concerned, it's been speculated that there is a relationship between being overweight and increased risk of breast cancer.

I also know very little about German women's diets. What are they eating that would cause them to be overweight, is indeed they are zafti?

Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 09:18 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

Setanta wrote:

The Miller/Foofie troll has a hard-on about Canadians. Miller has twice used "Canadian" as a term of disapprobation recently. They are the same person posting under two different accounts.


Or, two accounts by two people, with certain possible similarities due to having a common ancestor in the past two millenia, or maybe a little longer? Those Jewish genes really do make Jews similar, in my opinion. Something to think about as we approach All Saint Hallows Eve. A grand Celtic holiday.

All I want for Christmas is a Setanta sock puppet. Or, maybe an Izzy sock puppet? Imagine the arguments between an Irish and Brit sock puppet. Hours of fun.

Is it time for the "thimble" parade? Crying or Very sad
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 09:19 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

contrex wrote:

Foofie wrote:
I am concerned about American women only.


Where does it say in the Able2know constitution that only US concerns are allowed?



The key word is "I." I have to be concerned about non-U.S. folks?


No, not at all. Just use the "ignore button" like I do and move along.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 09:24 am
@Miller,
Miller wrote:
I would never go to Wikipedia for that information.
Wikipedia uses the data from the various national statistic offices (for Germany: Statistisches Bundesamt). Those data are sourced and linked. It's a lot easier than a) to go to some dozen websites of the various offices, b) look for and find the relevant link there.
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 09:31 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Miller wrote:
I would never go to Wikipedia for that information.
Wikipedia uses the data from the various national statistic offices (for Germany: Statistisches Bundesamt). Those data are sourced and linked. It's a lot easier than a) to go to some dozen websites of the various offices, b) look for and find the relevant link there.


i was referring to the use of Scientific Journals with peer reviews.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 09:34 am
@Miller,
Miller wrote:
i was referring to the use of Scientific Journals with peer reviews.
So you really think that data from "Scientific Journals with peer reviews" are better, different, more reliable than the official data from the national statistical offices? Interesting approach.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 11:39 am
@Walter Hinteler,
U.S. women are a mix of many ethnicities. German women are more of a homogeneous northern European gene pool; taller perhaps, and therefore a lesser bmi. You are comparing apples to oranges, in my opinion.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 11:44 am
@Foofie,
I am comparing nothing. I just looked the data.

Seems you are a geneticist who knows a lot more than people here about " German women are more of a homogeneous northern European gene pool".
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 11:57 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Seems you are a geneticist who knows a lot more than people here about " German women are more of a homogeneous northern European gene pool".


Walter, you are arguing with an idiot, a troll-provovateur (or provocatrice?).
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 12:02 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

I am comparing nothing. I just looked the data.

Seems you are a geneticist who knows a lot more than people here about " German women are more of a homogeneous northern European gene pool".


Not a geneticist; but, are you telling me that French women and German women are of the same gene pool? As many people believe, northern Europe has a population that is different than southern Europe. Height and body type are one of those differences. As I've read, 30% of German males have early male pattern balding. That is not typical in southern Europe. Naturally, over the centuries there has been much mixing, but statistically, German males have a disproportionate percent of early male pattern balding (by age 30 or so). Nyet?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 12:10 pm
@Foofie,
I've no idea. (But I would never suggest that I live in Northern Europe.)
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 12:20 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

I've no idea. (But I would never suggest that I live in Northern Europe.)


But, you do, or at least one half of Germany is considered northern Europe by many Americans, since the popular, non-religious reason for the Reformation alludes to northern Europe not wanting to answer to a Pope in southern Europe. So, the northern part of Germany that is Lutheran would be considered northern Europe in the popular notion of many Americans. Southern Europe is thought of as Catholic, while northern Europe is considered Protestant.

And, northern Europe is a possible euphemism for "nordic," and all the connotations of blond, tall, and Viking helmets (once upon a time).

It is possible that there are a few countries that are not northern in many Americans' minds, but not southern either. For example, Holland. But then again that was once just the sea?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 12:40 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
But, you do, or at least one half of Germany is considered northern Europe by many Americans, since the popular, non-religious reason for the Reformation alludes to northern Europe not wanting to answer to a Pope in southern Europe. So, the northern part of Germany that is Lutheran would be considered northern Europe in the popular notion of many Americans. Southern Europe is thought of as Catholic, while northern Europe is considered Protestant.

Well, it seems that the notion of Germany being northern Europe but e.g. the Netherlands not has a lot to do with education: The Netherlands are a predominantly Protestant country, are situated further north than most parts of Germany ...

Evangelical population of Germany
http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/a_zpsb795d878.jpg

Catholic population of Germany
http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/b_zps9e02e478.jpg
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 12:47 pm
The wisdom of Foofie: 1. Northern Europe is full of Aryan, Nordic blondes, and southern Europe is full of swarthy, garlic-chewing spics, and it's all because of their genes. 2. Germany is part of Northern Europe because many Americans think so.



Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 12:59 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

The wisdom of Foofie: 1. Northern Europe is full of Aryan, Nordic blondes, and southern Europe is full of swarthy, garlic-chewing spics, and it's all because of their genes. 2. Germany is part of Northern Europe because many Americans think so.

Quote:
Northern Europe is the northern part or region of the European continent. A United Nations report published in 2011 defines Northern Europe as including the following ten countries and dependent regions: Denmark (with Faroe Islands), Estonia, Finland (with Ă…land), Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway (Svalbard and Jan Mayen), Sweden, and the United Kingdom (with Guernsey, Isle of Man and Jersey).[1]

The UK and the Republic of Ireland are sometimes included in Western Europe;[2] as is Iceland for historical, cultural, linguistic and political reasons (compare Greenland which is part of the Kingdom of Denmark, but is geographically located in North America, and is sometimes considered to be in Northern Europe or the Nordic countries, though rarely Scandinavia proper).

Before the establishment of the Nordic Council in 1952, the term 'Nordic', or 'Northern', was commonly used to also refer to the Lutheran Baltic countries Estonia and Latvia, as well as the northern sections of European Russia.
Source: wikipedia

https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSFJ6o4Pbh_rpO8iM4K2XO24j9_9p7IvP9g_EVxaVVVduG6F_5miA
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 01:05 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I always thought Germany was in Mitteleuropa.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Grossgliederung_Europas-en.svg/577px-Grossgliederung_Europas-en.svg.png
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 01:08 pm
@contrex,
It might be so ... we even have CET here Wink
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 01:25 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

...Germany is part of Northern Europe because many Americans think so.



I think you've got it. Yes. What Americans think is the definitive definition of what is.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 01:30 pm
Funny thing, getting back to why German woman might tend to be very fat, especially ( according to the article ) in their butts is because the Germans favor diets enriched in fatty foods.

Fatty foods and too much sitting around tend to increase the risk for heart disease and breast cancer in German women, besides increasing their clothes sizes.

The best diets tend to be those favored by Swedish women.

Do German women tend toward diabetes II?

Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Oct, 2013 01:33 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I have never heard any Americans refer to Central Europe. I have heard of the Central Powers in WWI? Only western Europe and eastern Europe. In fact, as a child (1950's) Russians were referred to as Eurasians (perhaps due to the Cold War, and a possible hot war?).

If Europeans have different, and more nuanced definitions, I think that is cute; however, Americans being so far away just see the forest and not the individual trees, so to speak. Just east and west, or north and south. If there is a central Europe, shouldn't there be a Europe on the perimeter? Make it easy for Americans; in my opinion, many really think the world is comprised of New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, London, Berlin, Paris, and Beijing. The rest of the world is the hinterlands, perhaps in a different space-time zone?

 

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