7
   

Can someone please identify this ... bee?

 
 
Reply Thu 12 Sep, 2013 04:51 am
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/servlet/JiveServlet/showImage/2-34591-60546/apis_perplexa_6.jpg

Can someone please identify this ... bee? Photographed by a friend of mine in northern Greece / southern Macedonia (FYROM). Nobody - so far - has a clue about it ... Andrena ??? was the best we've got ...

Please help ... :-)

Thank you!
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Sep, 2013 01:40 pm

Possibility: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in745
timur
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Sep, 2013 01:46 pm
@PUNKEY,
Contrex wrote:
(Does total ignorance ever inhibit you from posting in a topic?)


It's a bee, not a wasp, most probably from the tree bumblebee family.

What inhibits me from saying is that I don't know the geographic area where it has been seen.
izzythepush
 
  5  
Reply Thu 12 Sep, 2013 04:14 pm
That's Harold, I was wondering where he'd got to.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Thu 12 Sep, 2013 05:06 pm
@izzythepush,
could be a syrphid fly. It IS a dipteran so its of a fly family

     http://bugguide.net/images/raw/DRQQ3RKQTRIQVRIQCRU0CR20FR600060K0KQK0E000G03QX03QZQYR7QORN0ORSQDRP0S0QQH0U0Q0.jpg
0 Replies
 
Bissgets
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Sep, 2013 02:26 am
@timur,
I don't know the geographic area where it has been seen.

Balkans - northern Greece, southern Macedonia (FYROM)
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  3  
Reply Fri 13 Sep, 2013 03:10 pm
Timur

Please be as rude to others who submit their "possibilities."
timur
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 14 Sep, 2013 06:23 am
@PUNKEY,
Sure, I can do that:

Farmerman wrote:
could be a syrphid fly


It's just nuts to offer that possibility. It's like you are explaining me the cleavage planes of an amorphous element.

Please post when you know something about the topic at hand.
timur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Sep, 2013 06:36 am
@Bissgets,
Actually, the Andrena suggestion was not a bad one.

But I'm torn between two hypothesis, because the puzzling yellow dots on the back of that Andrena (?).

The pic is not accurate enough as to know for sure if they are not loads of pollen.

Look here an Andrena Haemorrhoa, with and without pollen:

http://imageshack.us/a/img266/9015/4s6s.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img706/5682/2lqj.jpg


It could also be a Bombus Thoracica:

http://www.labaladenaturalistedesandrine.com/IMG/arton339.jpg


Look what a pollen loaded Bombus can look like:

http://bugguide.net/images/cache/UHRREHLRMH1ZHLGZ0L6ZGL1Z7LNZ8LYHIHCHLLNZEHVH4HEZ0LDH8HOHZLBH6HZRWHZR5LHRIL8Z7HAH5HZR5H8ZZL.jpg
Bissgets
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Sep, 2013 02:55 am
@timur,
Thanks to all, and especially to you, timur ... however ... ;-)

those yellow dots and a H-shaped yellow form above them are definitely not loads of pollen ... they are 'real' :-) ... and that's why everyone here (well, those with some entomologic knowledge, not me) is so perplexed about it ... :-)
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Mon 16 Sep, 2013 03:07 pm
@timur,
You seem to be unable to distinguish a dipteran from a hymenopteran. Anybody can look it up in google and guess that its a bumble bee but Im sticking with it being a FLY , a mimic.
Stop being a douche bag Timur. We can disagree without acting childish. I wouldn't dump all over anyone who " incorrectly tries" to explain a topic such as the nature of cleavage(Im not sure that, in your example, we'd need to consult anything other than a dictionary) . I used to be a teacher and being a pompous douche bag
is disrespectful to ones future colleagues. (Unless, of course one werea severely autistic "savant")
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Mon 16 Sep, 2013 06:41 pm
@Bissgets,
To me this looks like a bee and not a fly. Bees have four wings, two sets on each side. Flies only have two wings. Also, bees have smaller eyes proportionally than flies generally do. This image seems to have all those characteristics.

I agree that Andrena seems close, but the two yellow spots are distinctive and I don't believe they are just pollen marks, they are clearly part of the bee (unless the photo has been photoshopped, and I'm going to assume it hasn't).

I have looked through bee classification charts for this particular color pattern (including the brown color on the thorax), but there is no pattern with two spots like that.

I've also tried looking for Drones and Queens of various types thinking that there might be a unique pattern on the specialized bees. But I've had no luck there either.

At this point I have not been able to identify this bee.
timur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 05:31 am
@farmerman,
No need to throw your academic credentials at our face, again and again.

I have, at least, as much as you do.

However, and that is the difference, I don't make a fool of myself venturing outside my fields of expertise.

By the very nature of your comments, I can see you know as much about autism as you know about entomology, which is negligible.

Btw, Rosborne gave you some hints on the methodology you need to use to distinguish between a bee and a fly.

Using it doesn't hurt..
Bissgets
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 08:26 am
@rosborne979,
i got two suggestions (via e-mail) - Eucera sp. and Tetralonia sp. ...

i've done some image search and i'm not convinced, however no image of any bee seems to match this one.

any thoughts?
timur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 08:52 am
@Bissgets,
I don't think so.

The closer I came with those yellow dots is the Anthidium but the genus is quite extensive:

http://www.scielo.br/img/revistas/rbent/v46n4/a03fig01.gif
Bissgets
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 08:59 am
@timur,
whoa! :-)

which is the first one in your post?
timur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 09:09 am
@Bissgets,
It's an Anthidium Vigintiduopunctatum but it's not what we are looking for..
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 10:45 am
@timur,
I did no such thing. If you are somehow intimidated by anyone else, stop even mentioning "Academics" , as you know, if you went to school long enough, its what you've done since that has made your experise sound, not your abilities to have produced sevel theses and disserttions. That's just a way to show that you've got the patience to see some thing through and to work without constant direction.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 11:03 am
@rosborne979,
Quote:
Bees have four wings, two sets on each side. Flies only have two wings


that's right. That's what I thought I recognized in the first pic. The head isn't clear enough to see for me but the wings look dipteran to me.

I don't mind being wrong at all. I learn ever day from folks who don't take themselves so seriously. Thanks.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 Sep, 2013 11:26 am
@timur,
I went back an looked at your profile. You are one of thoise guys whose afraid to fill in anything. Id love to have a serious entymologist on the boards. Im aware of Rosborne's training and interests in the science . You, it appears, just like to jump in and insult people who you want to "put down". Ats ok dude, Ive gotten worse from many others .BUT, real science is generally collaborative not exclusive. If youre a bugs n bunnies kind a guy, Id be proud of it, I wouldn't be some rascal who slithers around to trade insults. Did my initial post somehow annoy you? I reread it and wondered how you got all bent out of shape over my saying this was a dipteran wing pattern??
You could have shared information more collegially and less mean-spirited rather than immediately jumping out and going for the insult. My insults were, as is typical of any net based discussion when someone lashes out, a response to you in kind.

, However, I love learning and Ive never been afraid to make a statement based on my limited knowledge in a field. THATS how I learned.

If I annoyed you, I apologize. Now Id like to hear how we distinguish this bug as a bee from those wings (Which still look fly-liketo me, that is, they only appear as ONE pair of wings(like all dipterans) and I thought I see a palp at the base of the wings)

 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Can someone please identify this ... bee?
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/19/2019 at 05:31:57