2
   

Renouncing US citizenship

 
 
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 04:03 am
Can an individual renounce their US citizenship, yet remain inside the borders of the US as a citizen of a particular state? I've read several stories of native Americans doing so, but their land is considered a sovereign nation into itself. Is that not also the case with the states? Or is residing in a particular state implied supplication to the laws under which the state is tied to the union?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 941 • Replies: 7
No top replies

 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 05:07 am
US citizenship can only be renounced (by making an oath before a US consular official) at locations outside the USA. The only people likely to do this are those who already hold citizenship of at least one other country (my niece has triple citizenship - Canada, USA, UK) since otherwise they would become stateless. Such a person who has newly renounced US citizenship would now be a foreigner in the eyes of the US authorities and would have to hold a valid visa before they could enter US territory, and if they eventually obtained the right to lawful permanent residence, (the so-called "Green Card") they would lack certain rights which are enjoyed by US citizens.

Lawful Permanent Residents generally do not have eligibility for federal government jobs. the right to vote, the right to be elected in federal and state elections, the ability to bring family members to the United States (permanent residents are allowed to sponsor certain family members, but this is often not practical due to long approval delays).

Male permanent residents between the ages of 18 and 25 are subject to registering in the Selective Service System. Permanent residents who reside in the United States must pay taxes on their worldwide income, like U.S. citizens.

It is easier to involuntarily lose Permanent Residence status than it is to lose US citizenship: PR status can be lost for various reasons including committing a criminal act that makes a person removable from the United States, moving to another country to live there permanently, staying outside the USA for more than 365 days without getting a re-entry permit before leaving, or not filing an income tax return.

Thus I cannot see why anybody would want to do this.

contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 07:58 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:
Thus I cannot see why anybody would want to do this.


That is, leave the US, renounce US citizenship, and then return to live in the USA.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 08:34 am
@contrex,
And how are you goingto return to US when you have no citizenship, no passport or any connection to another country?
Getting a citizenship in another country usually takes a few years, during these years you have to work and earn a living. How will you do that in a country where you might not speak the language, where you cannot prove who you are?
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 09:41 am
@saab,
Renouncing US citizenship only makes sense if you already have at least one other nationality.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 10:28 am
@contrex,
That is whatI said:
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 11:54 am
@saab,
saab wrote:

That is whatI said:



...and what I said before that.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Jul, 2013 12:03 pm
@Patriotmouse ,
Patriotmouse wrote:

Is that not also the case with the states? Or is residing in a particular state implied supplication to the laws under which the state is tied to the union?

http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship_776.html
Quote:
C. REQUIREMENT - RENOUNCE ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES

A person seeking to renounce U.S. citizenship must renounce all the rights and privileges associated with such citizenships. In the case of Colon v. U.S. Department of State , 2 F.Supp.2d 43 (1998), the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia rejected Colon’s petition for a writ of mandamus directing the Secretary of State to approve a Certificate of Loss of Nationality in the case because he wanted to retain the right to live in the United States while claiming he was not a U.S. citizen.


In Colon the court ruled you can't renounce US citizenship and still live in the US without documentation from another country. Any attempt to do so invalidates your attempt to renounce citizenship.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Renouncing US citizenship
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 09/22/2021 at 02:29:51