22
   

What do you call your mom's sister? (or your dad's)

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 11:44 am
@Debacle,
Sort of like church latin and non church latin. I forget what non-church is called. I'm probably just imagining Ciceronian, since the word Cicero is used as an example. May it's just called latin. I had four years of the church type, which I highly forget.
Debacle
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 11:56 am
@ossobuco,
osso, this is an interesting article on Anglization (or Anglisation, if you prefer) but I still don't understand why in the dickens Livorno would be called Leghorn. Unless they ignored the people while stealing their chickens.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglicisation
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 11:58 am
It may be sammich to some, but to me it's samwich.

As for those red fruits. A tamaydo is great in a salad or in a samwich.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:03 pm
@Debacle,
Did Dickens go through Livorno?
Debacle
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:11 pm
@Roberta,
Totally agree, Roboida, even though I've never reckoned the tomato to be a fruit. I know all about that La Pomme D'Amour love apple crap (pardon my French) but I still say if something grows in my veggie patch it's a veggie, unless it's a slug or a snake.

And as for the world bein' round, don't even get me started on that rubbish.
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:13 pm
As for sandwich…we in New Jersey definitely say sangwich or sangwitch.


Nobody here in New Jersey (‘cepting me) ever pronounces the “p” in raspberry.

I know several people here who pronounce Wednesday like it is spelled.
Debacle
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:15 pm
@ossobuco,
Of course he did, A Tale of Two Cities: Leghorn and Livorno.

Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:17 pm
@Debacle,
The English name "Leghorn" for Livorno derives from the dialect name in Tuscany: Legorno.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:33 pm
It has always surprised me that many dictionaries show the correct pronounciation for "temperature" (which I pronounce as written)...

...in several different ways.

It can be as though it were written:

tempeture;

temperture;

and tempreture.

Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:33 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Which begs the question:

What do you all your aunt when she runs a temperature?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:41 pm
@Debacle,
Very good, man.

I read Dickens on Italy, but forget where and what. Something about various transportation problems.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:43 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Ah, now I know.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:45 pm
@ossobuco,
Which brings up read, as in to read, and read, sounding like red.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:47 pm
@ossobuco,
That's church (ecclesiastical) Latin and classic Latin.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 12:52 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I'll have to ply George (or you, Walter) to tell me how to say 'thank you'.

Teo gratias? (I made that up)
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 01:00 pm
@ossobuco,
Gratias agimus tibi (I think).
Debacle
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 01:05 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Thanks, Walter. I appreciate that. The Legorno, Leghorn connection.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 01:33 pm
@Debacle,
The leghorn, btw, is commonly known as Italian ("Italiener") in German.
(Livorno is "Livorno".)
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 01:47 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Mine was a play on deo gratias - I've got to stop the playing, I'm sort of manic after being in a total down dump for many days. Ordinarily, I'd just say gratias, as say, a person on the street in old Rome.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 02:23 pm
@ossobuco,
Uh-oh...... it's part 2!



......and the answer to the Adeeeedas, Addydas question in the vid?

Sorry Americans, but it's Addydas.
Walter will no doubt give further detail, but Adidas was owned by a man called Adolf Dassler, and his nickname was Adi Dass.

His brother, who fell out with him years before, went and opened a factory on the other side of town as a direct competitor to Adi.
His firm was called Puma.

So none of this adeeee stuff, addy das from now on. I shall be listening.
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/20/2022 at 04:35:37