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Definition of Immigrant

 
 
Reply Tue 9 Jul, 2013 08:18 am
Definition of Immigrant
If there are indeed 7.5 million people settled in the UK who were born abroad with foreign citizenship, it may be considered a very large proportion of the population. 13 per cent or so. It has social-environmental consequences.
But when we refer to immigrants in general parlance and understanding, merely having been born abroad is a very tight or narrow definition.
It may be nearer normal understanding to refer to "immigrant families". That is to say people born abroad, and their children - who may have been born in this country.
Indeed, a broader definition would be, all those families who have foreign affiliation through descent and cultural association.
A native of the UK [or any country] being those with both biological and cultural descent within the country for a time immemorial period.
The idea, for instance, that Americans are anything but Europeans [and increasingly Asian] and any substantial descent from Amerindians is absurd.
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Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jul, 2013 08:34 am
@RW Standing,
Anybody who does not live in Africa is an immigrant then.
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mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jul, 2013 04:44 pm
@RW Standing,
If you take up residency in a country, other than your own, you are an immigrant.
Your descendants, if born in that country, will not be.

Otherwise everyone who lives outside Ethiopia is an immigrant.
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Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jul, 2013 05:31 pm
@RW Standing,
RW Standing wrote:
A native of the UK [or any country] being those with both biological and cultural descent within the country for a time immemorial period.
The idea, for instance, that Americans are anything but Europeans [and increasingly Asian] and any substantial descent from Amerindians is absurd.


It is neither biological nor cultural descent which determines citizenship. It is based on acceptance of a person as a citizen by the government of a given country (the UK, for example, if you like). In the USA this is very clear and has been understood from the begining. You're wrong, of course, in stating that "Americans are...but Europeans." We speak of African-Americans, of French-Americans, Irish-Americans, Italian-Americans and so on. All are Americans despite their ethnic and often racial differences. Ethnicity has nothing to do with citizenship in America. I realize that this is a new concept for most Europeans who have real difficulty in considering a black man as 'British' or 'French' or whatever. Nevertheless, it is the wave of the future and, imo, a good thing. We are all primarily human, only secondarily members of some specific ethnic group.

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