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The disappearing moon

 
 
Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 11:56 pm
Hypothetically if the moon suddenly disappeared, is there a way to calculate the exact time we would feel the effects.. could it be instantaneous?

And if so does that imply a connection between 2 bodies that exceeds the speed of light?
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 1,035 • Replies: 8
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 08:07 am
@Hunter84,
If such a hypothetical event occurred, the effects would not be felt instantaneously, even gravity propagates at the speed of light.
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dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 11:01 am
@Hunter84,
Quote:
…….. could it be instantaneous?
It's a good q, Hunt, one I've long entertained. Surprisingly enough Science still isn't sure about grav waves

Quote:
And if so does that imply a connection between 2 bodies that exceeds the speed of light?
My feeling too. Hope we'll hear from somebody

Edited to remark we just heard from Ros, while a subsequent Googling seems to confirm the idea. Still there are a few loose ends

http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/gravity/overview.php
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 01:35 pm
@dalehileman,

The Article you linked wrote:
Kopeikin and Fomalont became the first two people to quantitatively measure the speed of gravity, one of the fundamental constants of nature. They found that gravity does move at the same speed as light.

I don't see any "loose ends" as you suggested. What loose ends are you referring to?
Fil Albuquerque
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 02:25 pm
@Hunter84,
1 second to feel the effects !
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dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 03:33 pm
@rosborne979,
Quote:
I don't see any "loose ends" as you suggested. What loose ends are you referring to?
I had read somewhere that nobody had ever detected a grav wave

http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/gravity/overview.php

Could be, Ros, that I'm just hopelessly behind the very latest
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 07:14 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Quote:
I don't see any "loose ends" as you suggested. What loose ends are you referring to?
I had read somewhere that nobody had ever detected a grav wave

Just because gravity waves haven't been measured yet doesn't mean that there are any loose ends.

The question being addressed related to the speed at which the effects of gravity could be felt (not necessarily gravity waves), and the article you yourself posted offered evidence that gravity is not instantaneous and does indeed propagate at the speed of light (which supports my original answer, thank you very I guess).

It's one thing to be hopelessly behind the latest info, but it's another to misrepresent the very point of the link you provided.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 10:39 am
@rosborne979,
Quote:
to misrepresent the very point of the link you provided.
Doubtless there's such a thing as a grav wave, and probably yes, it travels at velocity c. However the fact that it hasn't yet been detected is still a loose end
0 Replies
 
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 12:39 am
@Hunter84,
It's the tide time continuum.



There is a tide in the affairs of men.
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
0 Replies
 
 

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