4
   

School is getting creepier.

 
 
Reply Wed 27 Mar, 2013 10:51 am
Have you heard about this new student data base?

Quote:
In operation just three months, the database already holds files on millions of children identified by name, address and sometimes social security number. Learning disabilities are documented, test scores recorded, attendance noted. In some cases, the database tracks student hobbies, career goals, attitudes toward school - even homework completion.

Local education officials retain legal control over their students' information. But federal law allows them to share files in their portion of the database with private companies selling educational products and services.

Entrepreneurs can't wait.

.............

The database is a joint project of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which provided most of the funding, the Carnegie Corporation of New York and school officials from several states. Amplify Education, a division of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, built the infrastructure over the past 18 months. When it was ready, the Gates Foundation turned the database over to a newly created nonprofit, inBloom Inc, which will run it.

States and school districts can choose whether they want to input their student records into the system; the service is free for now, though inBloom officials say they will likely start to charge fees in 2015. So far, seven states - Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Massachusetts - have committed to enter data from select school districts. Louisiana and New York will be entering nearly all student records statewide.


Oh yeah..... there's this:

Quote:
While inBloom pledges to guard the data tightly, its own privacy policy states that it "cannot guarantee the security of the information stored ... or that the information will not be intercepted when it is being transmitted."


http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/03/us-education-database-idUSBRE92204W20130303?irpc=932
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Mar, 2013 11:25 am
At least there's some good news on the education front...

Quote:
The Texas House on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly to loosen high school graduation requirements and significantly reduce high-stakes testing after a daylong debate in which legislators grappled with how academic rigor and flexibility can co-exist.

House Bill 5 won preliminary passage on a 145-2 vote. State Rep. Mark Strama, D-Austin, who unsuccessfully pushed an amendment aimed at steering more students toward college, and state Rep. Naomi Gonzalez, D-El Paso, were the only nays.

The legislation reduces from 15 to five the number of end-of-course exams needed for graduation from high school and amounts to an about-face for Texas, which has been at the forefront of the standardized testing movement. The required tests would be algebra, biology, U.S. history and 10th-grade reading and writing.


When it comes to education, most of the country trails along after Texas so maybe the end of testing madness is in sight.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Mar, 2013 11:44 am
@boomerang,
One of the things you have to consider is that George Washington, at 15 or 16, was out earning the equivalent of 100k/yr as a surveyer. In today's world, he'd be locked up for truancy and his parents would be locked up for contributing to the delinquency of a minor child.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 08:04 am
Here's a cool infographic about schools in Finland:

http://cdn.slowrobot.com/3420131500195.jpg
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 08:10 am
@gungasnake,
Did you know that many cities have truancy hotlines?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fd/Truancy_hotline.jpg

Mo's school has a 2 week spring break while the other public schools only have 1. "Shouldn't he be in school?" was a question we heard several times over the last week!
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  3  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 09:00 am
@boomerang,
I don't like that school database at all and would consider that an infringement of my children's rights. There should be an option where you can opt out of that, or require a signature of permission. I think I would consult a lawyer to see what, if anything, I could do to opt out.
Setanta
 
  4  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 09:23 am
@gungasnake,
You just can't resist making this sh*t up, can you? Washington was articled as a surveyor when he was 15, that part is true. But there was no public education system in the colonies then, and no truancy laws. Nobody's children were getting any public education, and whatever education children did get they got at home, or if their parents were relatively affluent, in a local private school. Washington got a small fee from the Commonwealth of Virginia if he was sent to survey land on the orders of the Governor and Council, which required approval of the House of Burgesses. One of the ways that people in such positions were compensated was to be allowed to make small claims of public lands which they surveyed. To say he was earning the equivalent of $100,000 is, not to put too fine a point on it, bullshit. Washington, largely at his elder, half-brother's expense, made survey's all over the western part of Virginia and of Pennsylvania, which entitled him to make a great many claims. As a result, he was a very wealthy man, on paper, after the French and Indian War. However, he never pressed his claims in wilderness areas, especially after the revolution, when many of the "squatters" were veterans of the war. The claims he did press were for areas where settlement had already taken place. Washington had a constant struggle to make ends meet later in life, and as he never profited from commanding the armies during the revolution or when he was President, that was true until the day he died.

For anyone who would really like to know about Washington's life, i recommend the four volume biography by Thomas Flexner, or the seven volume biography by Douglas Southall Freeman. There is a good one volume abridged version of Flexner, entitled Washington, the Indispensable Man.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 10:15 am
@Mame,
I don't like it either!

I was reading Diane Ravitch's blog post and comments about it. She said:

Quote:
dianerav
March 26, 2013 at 1:30 pm

The state has already agreed to share confidential student and teacher data with Wireless Generation, to be put on a “cloud” managed by amazon.com.

At this point, the only question is whether our legislatures will act to block the release of student data without the permission of parents.

I don’t know how to stop the release of teacher data


The whole discussion is worth reading: http://dianeravitch.net/2013/03/26/who-owns-your-childs-data/
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Apr, 2013 09:57 am
More crazy crap from the world of schooling:

Quote:
According to KnoxNews, Tennessee legislators are attempting to pass legislation to cut the welfare benefits of parents with children who don't meet attendance and performance requirements. The bill, SB 132, is sponsored by Sen. Stacey Campfield, R-Knoxville, and Rep. Vance Dennis, R-Savannah, and has passed committees in both the House and Senate, and now heads to another House committee, and to the Senate floor for vote.

The state Department of Human Services originally opposed the bill, but then worked with Campfield and Knox to add exceptions for kids with disabilities (both physical and learning) or if parents take school-approved steps to attempt to improve the child's progress.


I like this take on it:

Quote:
You have an undiagnosed learning disability and you failed the tests? No dinner for you! You miss school because you have no way of getting there? Good job, selfish, now nobody in your family gets to eat. You didn't get your homework done because you're so ******* hungry and that's all you can think about? CRY ME A RIVER.

And, of course, this only targets already financially struggling families. If you're rich and your kid is doing shitty in school — who cares? You're rich!
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 07:49 am
@boomerang,
I was looking at an education forum this morning and teachers were talking about this.

The general tone ran something like this "Great. Now if I fail a student I get to feel responsible for his family going hungry."

I hadn't thought about that. What a tough spot to put teachers in.
0 Replies
 
 

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