23
   

RULES OF THE SEMICOLON, please

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 09:37 am
@farmerman,
I like them; well, I would.
nextone
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 10:23 am
@ossobuco,
Hi osso,

"I like them; well. I would."

alternatively

You like them well; you do. Smile
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 10:30 am
@nextone,
Very Happy

Oh, that's a comma after the well, in my version. Typo! Typo!
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 10:31 am
The semi colon refers to the sigmoidoscopy...not as intrusive as the colonoscopy. You're welcome.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 10:33 am
@blueveinedthrobber,
So true.
0 Replies
 
Lola
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 12:56 pm
@farmerman,
Farmerman, I heard this story reported (about the nuns) several years ago. I was also impressed because I personally prefer an uncluttered writing style. I often write short sentences, making use of a certain cadence. I admire writers like Hemingway and a psychoanalyst I know named Charles Brenner. Neither showed signs of dementia before they died. Of course, Hemingway died precipitously. However, my friend Brenner died at the age of 94. At his death, he was fully in command of his brainpower.

I, of course worried about myself when I first heard about these nuns. However, I believe at this point in my life, it's too late for early onset dementia. Still I suppose I still could loose my mind.

contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 12:59 pm
@Lola,
Lolaessense wrote:
Of course, Hemingway died precipitously.


I thought he shot himself.
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 01:02 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Quote:
Re: Lolaessense (Post 5240111)
Lolaessense wrote:
Of course, Hemingway died precipitously.


I thought he shot himself.


That's pretty precipitous.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 01:27 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:

Quote:
Quote:
Re: Lolaessense (Post 5240111)
Lolaessense wrote:
Of course, Hemingway died precipitously.


I thought he shot himself.


That's pretty precipitous.


Only if he did it while falling over a cliff.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 01:43 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
Roberta covered that already.
Thought might be possibility Farm so Rob, sorry about my laziness
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 02:13 pm
@Lola,
Hi, Lola.
I like several kinds of writing, writ by those good at the various types.
I like spare writing such as you are talking about.
I like word pictures and word sounds in writing, the musicality of some writing, but easily erupt with distaste if all that becomes very noticeable.
There is writing for design specification, and writing to describe how you felt yesterday when the bird landed on your plate, and moody writing, near poetry.

I'm about to start in on a book by David Foster Wallace that I expect to have some reactions to, good, bad, or indifferent, having not read him before but having read a fair amount about him.
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 02:22 pm
Just in case anybody is bothered, my point above is that these words have different meanings and are often confused:

Precipitate used as an adjective means "sudden or hasty".

Precipitous is an adjective that means "dangerously steep or like a precipice".

Hemingway may have died precipitately but he did not die precipitously.

Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 02:30 pm
@Lola,
???
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 03:31 pm
@contrex,
Gotcha, kid.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 03:39 pm
@Lola,
He He , me too. EOD, as defined, is a type of Alzheimers that seems to move quickly in its etiology;the amyloid plaques are more quickly quickly established and the victms, usually in their late 40's, to early 50's, dont last as long as one who developed it later in life.(I think I used a semicolon properly).
Just like any disease has a pathway pf manifestation, not all follow in a strait line, so maybe someone who NEVER wrote in cluttered thought piles will not provide any symptamology. I dont know I was just fscinatd by the nuns tales (and the associated use of semicolons that helped introduce it to me.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 03:43 pm
@contrex,
Theres a final definition meaning rain
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 03:44 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Theres a final definition meaning rain


... and?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 03:45 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Quote:
Theres a final definition meaning rain and /or chemical sludge
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 04:40 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Quote:
Quote:
Theres a final definition meaning rain and /or chemical sludge


That's a noun. We're talking about an adjective.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 04:52 pm
@Roberta,
Agreed. And personally, although I abuse a lot of grammar rules (starting a sentence with a conjunction, for example!! Not to mention ending with a preposition, oh well... lol), I love the semi-colon. I think whomever summed it up as a combo of the comma and period (which is what it looks like) is right on. A longer pause.
 

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