fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 07:50 pm
But if you're a Sateluco, half of your life is spent inside your car (God, I love the Satélite towers):

http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/img/2009/02/Ciu/viaductobsatelite_fn.jpg

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 07:51 pm
@fbaezer,
Ah - I remember peseros as sort of alternative taxis..
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 07:53 pm
@ossobuco,
Yes, but they are not as plentiful as they used to be only a few years ago.

For example, there are hardly any VW taxis left.

Most taxis look like this now:

http://noticiasmvsfotos.blob.core.windows.net/media/fotos/e222bf530c44e7b90c2640c550a9813c.jpg

Less than a decade ago, most of them looked like this:

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ8z7F73m-kdc7SQtYSxrRhJXVoNlYmGMq7MSAmIJdwPTh0nudGbg
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 07:54 pm
@ossobuco,
Pesero, the poor person's taxi.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 07:58 pm
Oh, I liked them and just looked them up, and dammit - of course...

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4043/4460153706_30c139cdb0_z.jpg
The Torres de Satélite in Mexico City is a highway sculpture by Mathias Goeritz and Luis Barragán, completed fifty years ago. The towers stand dramatically as the busy highway wraps around it, and the urban environment around that. The five obelisks are regarded as the entrance to the Ciudad Satellite suburb. The concrete towers introduce a colorful statement on the city fabric, a sort of mixing of city aesthetic, billboards and such, and the infrastructure.
http://architecturerevived.blogspot.com/2008/11/satellite-towers-mexico-city.html

I'm a long rabid Barragan person, and ever so slightly met him (he nodded at us) and talked with Mathias Goeritz for a bit, friendly, nice guy, not in a hurry (I was in a small group) back in the mid eighties, when they came to Cal Poly Pomona for a talk. I think it was mid eighties, time flies.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 08:07 pm
@fbaezer,
Yes, I think it was one peso when we took them - but maybe I misremember and it was slightly more.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 08:13 pm
Which brings up San Angel.. I need to figure out where it is re the map.
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 08:42 pm
@ossobuco,
If it was in the 60s and early 70s, it was one peso, such the nickname "peseros".

Now, it depends on the mileage, starting at 3 pesos.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 08:44 pm
@ossobuco,
In the subway map it is a south of the end of the orange line. A fast pesero will take you to San Angel from the Barranca del Muerto station.

In the overall map, it's southwest. At delegación Alvaro Obregón, near the border with Coyoacán.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 08:48 pm
@fbaezer,
Thanks!
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 01:45 pm
@fbaezer,
...but not the traffic~! LOL
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 02:48 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Tell me about it. Today I had an errand to do: 10 minutes one way, 40 minutes the way back. And it was not to Satélite!
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 08:43 pm
@fbaezer,
I've just read all about chinampas. Truly fascinating. The flooding makes complete sense now. The aztecs had it figured out, built a massive lake with dams and the Spanish blew it all up. All the rain gathers in the mountains and rolls down the hills. In 1629 the city flooded and remained under water for five years. Mexico City defies nature.. it's amazing that in what was a lake lies one of the biggest cities in the word. Ingenuity abounds.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Mar, 2013 08:12 pm
Remember Juan O'Gorman?
He's the important muralist and architect, mostly famous for the building and mural of the Central Library of UNAM.

His house has been rehabilitated. It is next to the Diego & Frida studio-house built by O'Gorman in San Angel Inn:


http://ep01.epimg.net/cultura/imagenes/2013/03/22/actualidad/1363980562_541976_1363981404_noticia_normal.jpg

And it now hosts an exhibition about O'Gorman's former house (now destroyed) at San Jerónimo, which was a crazy very anti-functionalist, and anti-O'Gorman building:

http://ep01.epimg.net/cultura/imagenes/2013/03/22/actualidad/1363980562_541976_1363982798_sumario_normal.jpg
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Mar, 2013 08:20 pm
And... remember the statue of Azerbaijani dictator Aliyev at Chapultepec?

http://p2.trrsf.com/image/fget/cf/407/305/images.terra.com/2013/01/21/3178584.jpg

It's a month now that it is gone. The city government decided it "did not honor the city". The map of Azerbaijan remains, though.

http://eleconomista.com.mx/files/imagecache/nota_completa/reforma-ge-2.jpg
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Mar, 2013 09:29 pm
@fbaezer,
Strange to look at..
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Mar, 2013 09:35 pm
@fbaezer,
Why? Did he do something besides donate a statue in order to get a statue? Does Azerbaijan hold some special memory for Mexicans?
Ceili
 
  3  
Reply Sun 24 Mar, 2013 05:52 pm
https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/904064_579928312024910_1532345152_o.jpg
Mexico Citiy. Another picture by Cmd. Hadfield from the Space Station.
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Mar, 2013 10:05 pm
@Ceili,
Azerbaijan donated for the remodeling of that part of the park, and negotiated to get the statue with the former mayor.
Most Mexicans don't even know where is Azerbaijan.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Mar, 2013 10:05 pm
@Ceili,
Great picture of the monster.
0 Replies
 
 

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