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CIA Chief Petraeus resigns as result of extra-marital affair

 
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2012 07:28 pm
@firefly,
You had outdone yourself in posting nonsense Firefly..........
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2012 07:30 pm
@firefly,
We need sloppy generals; the answer to military competency.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2012 07:39 pm
That one is hard to read. I'm +/- on Petraeus, but this one sounds like a petunia with an agenda.
or, maybe right.
Sigh.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2012 07:50 pm
It nice when you see an article in a major online magazine agreeing with me for the most part concerning digit security/internet security.

Of course by Firefly lights these people must also be Pedophiles for daring to share such information that pedophiles could use to trade CP in safety.

One comment I do not agree with is their statements concerning smart phones as none of them have the ability to stop an all out attack with the out of favor blackberry being the best. Also no password less that 12 characters or more will stop an NSA or even FBI brute force level of attack. A four digit passcode will not stand up to even a normal PC for more then a second so the statement "Four-digit pins can be cracked reasonably quickly" is one hell of an understatement.

Here is a link that will give you an idea of how the time to break a password can go from mill-seconds to billions of years depending on it length.

https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm


Quote:
http://www.salon.com/2012/11/14/how_not_to_be_paula_broadwell/

Don’t be the next Broadwell

A quick and dirty guide to locking down your online life -- and staying safe from government snooping
By Andrew Leonard


Call it Paula Broadwell blowback. If there’s anything we’ve learned from the tawdry mess that has suddenly overwhelmed our nation’s highest military and intelligence agency leaders, it’s that it’s far too easy for the government to pry into our email. Long-standing privacy concerns have reawakened with a vengeance. Last night, a correspondent amusingly writing Salon under the pseudonym “Fox Mulder” beseeched us to publish “an in-depth story (or stories) on how citizens can regain their privacy from the National Security State.” We’re working on that, but in the meantime, here are some quick and dirty tips for how you can start locking down your online life.

Remember, there are always going to be trade-offs for increased security , the more you encrypt your data to make it impossible for snoops to access, the more inconvenient it will be to get at your own information yourself. So be forewarned — you can find an astonishing plenitude of information on the Web about how to secure your information, but complete privacy is never going to be hassle-free.

1) Your smartphone

The most recent versions of the iPhone’s operating system, iOS, generally get high marks from security professionals, and Android phones have a fairly simple mechanism for encrypting all data, but by far the most important step is to use a passkey that locks your phone. And even that is no permanent guarantee of safety. Four-digit pins can be cracked reasonably quickly by brute force, six digits take longer, and so on. The iPhone has a setting that freezes access if more than 10 different attempts to input a pin number are employed in quick succession. Use it.

2) Your browsing

Want to ensure that a morning spent surfing the Web to figure out how to outwit the FBI is kept hidden from, uh, the FBI? Try TOR — a freely available software program that bounces your online communications through a series of encrypted connections across the Internet. No more “traffic analysis” of your habits, whether by Facebook or the FBI. One caveat: Using Tor will slow your Web browsing experience. For most of the world, that’s probably a deal-breaker.

3) Your hard drive

You’d rather the government doesn’t know that you’ve been writing pornographic fan fiction about the CIA director and a pair of Lebanese twins? Encrypt your hard drive data. Truecrypt is one popular, well-regarded, free option.

4) Your email

There are no shortage of encryption programs that will lock up your email. The old gold standard, Pretty Good Privacy, is now part of a package of commercially available encryption products sold by Symantec. There are also free software options, built on top of the GPG (GNU Privacy Guard) standard. Some may find, however, that their user-friendliness is less than ideal.

But then again, nobody ever said that defending yourself from the curiosity of the national security state would be easy.
Continue Reading Close

Andrew Leonard is a staff writer at Salon. On Twitter, @koxinga21
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2012 08:28 pm
@BillRM,
I just created a simple password that even with the

Massive Cracking Array Scenario:
(Assuming one hundred trillion guesses per second)

it would take 1.16 billion centuries to discover.

Given this simple scenario, why isn't it possible to make everything anyone ever does on a computer completely private?

The 4 digit passwords we use for debits/credit cards,

Massive Cracking Array Scenario:
(Assuming one hundred trillion guesses per second)

0.000000000111 seconds

For a "regular" online attack,

Online Attack Scenario:
(Assuming one thousand guesses per second)

11.11 seconds.

YIKES!!!!!!
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2012 08:53 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Given this simple scenario, why isn't it possible to make everything anyone ever does on a computer completely private?


I think I am safe from any likely attack or even unlikely attack however there is always what is call side channel attacks if someone wish to get the information bad enough.

Can not brute force your password less alone break your 128 AES encrypted then just get a keylogger malware on your computer or a hardware keylogger or pull the security tape from burger king where you had enter the password to log on to your laptop.

Hell they can wait for you to be on your computer at home with you log on and your security down and they can pretend to be about to tow your car away.

You rush out of the house to stop whoever is about to tow your car away and you did not shut the computer down first.

Also Google "the evil maid attack' for another way to get around heavy duty encrypted security.

You never can be completely secure but you can make someone work very very very hard to break your security.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 07:12 am
@firefly,
LUCIAN K. TRUSCOTT IV levels some extremely serious allegations in that piece.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 07:27 am
@spendius,
It's pretty consistent with the coverage Petraeus got from the non-US / non-mainstream media over the past decade.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 07:35 am
@ehBeth,
And that's a pretty serious allegation about mainstream media.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 07:39 am
@spendius,
works for me
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 07:45 am
@spendius,
If you read this article--and the articles linked within it--it does appear that the media colluded in crafting and promoting a heroic image for Petraeus which both lacked objectivity as well as warranted criticism.
Quote:
Did the media fall for David Petraeus' hype?

As the media digests the fallout from Petraeus' sex scandal, it's scrutinizing the role it played in canonizing him as an American hero-saint

November 12, 2012
http://theweek.com/article/index/236263/did-the-media-fall-for-david-petraeus-hype
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 10:36 am
@firefly,
Quote:
If you read this article--and the articles linked within it--it does appear that the media colluded in crafting and promoting a heroic image for Petraeus which both lacked objectivity as well as warranted criticism.


I hope you don't think that's news to me ff. I wouldn't bother with the "appear".

Media is only scrutinizing its role after the event.

Lions led by donkeys is as true today as it ever was.

I noticed that in the lead up to the Soviet disintegration that the senior military officer's medal display acreage increased alarmingly.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 10:45 am
@spendius,
spendius wrote:
Media is only scrutinizing its role after the event.


American mainstream media got busted on this. There has been less favourable coverage of Petraeus (and U.S. involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan) in other media for a long time.

I'm sure you understand the difference between American media and media in other countries, as well as the difference between mainstream media and non-mainstream media.

U.S. mainstream media is very conservative and supportive of its conservative heroes/those they want to make conservative heroes.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 10:53 am
@ehBeth,
I think Media is our single biggest problem Beth.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 11:03 am
@spendius,
spendius wrote:

I think Media is our single biggest problem Beth.

nope....poor education/idiocy is
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 11:05 am
@hawkeye10,
I think those derive from Media.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 11:21 am
@spendius,
laziness is another contender...
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 11:45 am
@hawkeye10,
Maybe we need more laziness.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 06:03 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
nope....poor education/idiocy is


What is your alternative, hawk, to dumbasses and general idiocy?

Are you sure you're not taking the easy route to a claim to personal excellence?

Which is idiotic because all the highly intelligent members of A2K can see through such a baseless assertion absent any peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary.

That's true isn't it folks?

0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2012 07:52 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
U.S. mainstream media is very conservative and supportive of its conservative heroes/those they want to make conservative heroes.


That's quite a large measure short of the truth, Beth. Still hoping for an invite to some A2K gatherings I see.

U.S. mainstream media does all it can to cover and disguise US war crimes and US terrorism. The invasions of both Iraq and Afghanistan were crimes against humanity. They were no different than Hitler's attacks against European countries.

The US media is really not much different than the Nazi propaganda machine.
0 Replies
 
 

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