1
   

Håkon and Håkan, from Turkish?

 
 
2622572
 
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 08:18 am
Hello fellow languagelovers! I am a translation and interpreting student from Turkey and I really like Nordic languages. I have a question;
The word itself is very much distinguished as a Turkic word, which is being used as a name today. The most reasonable analyze of the word is "Han" + "Kağan", if we want to explain the difference between these titles, Han would be the title of King Faisal and Kağan would be Caesars title. By joining those two, "hakan" would be a much higher title...
Han and Kağan are possibly among the most ancient Turkish words known today. Variants of Han is actively being used like "Hane" which means House, "hanedan", which means dynasty. Kağan is actively being used as a name in both Kağan and Kaan forms. (I think the second form is an abomination, a terrible insult made by leftists to humiliate Turkness) Some sources say Nordic and Turkic hakans have nothing of a common descent and absolutely from different roots. I obviously don't think so, I would like your opinions on this, thanks in advance!
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 3,961 • Replies: 28

 
saab
 
  3  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 08:54 am
Håkan is an old Nordic name which means of high-born family.
It has nothing to do with Turkish.
2622572
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:07 am
@saab,
So you are saying all that vocal and lexical similarity is just a coincidence because coincidences are very common in this field..?
Attila is also a very old Nordic name right?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:16 am
@2622572,
The given name Håkon derives from the Old Norse given name Hákon.
Old Norse The writing system was at first in runes, then in Latin.

As far as I know, Attila is from a Turkic language related to Danube Bulgarian, not from any Germanic language.
2622572
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:28 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Then Hákon is derived from Turkish, there are some words you can easily guess its origin (like "ispiyon" which means to rat out obviously comes from the word "espionage") or some words that are not easily connected to their roots (like the Swedish dish Kol-dolma, we also have the exact same dish with the same name, "dolma" comes from "doldurmak - to stuff" but we call it "lahana dolması - cabbage dolma") and there are some words that you know exactly its root. Hakan is in this category...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:42 am
@2622572,
You mean, the Runes are originally Turkish and Old Norse isn't a Germanic language?
2622572
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:45 am
@2622572,
There is also the deal with the wolf Fenrir, fenrisulfr or fenrisulven, I need to state that I am not trying to claim anyones language or mythology, but that's not a hawk or a horse or a whale or snake, that's a wolf and wolf is Turkish. Our all mythology, every legend, there is always wolf. We had wolf literally ten thousand years ago (http://googlesightseeing.com/2007/08/the-great-white-pyramid-of-china/ that pyramid is ours, nobody can get in these days thanks to china government, and that's an ancient giant document of such claims) Same similarity also goes with Romus and Romulus. These are speculations but world being round was also one sometime ago... It seems we had serious cultural interaction with nords.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:50 am
@2622572,
Okay. So all Germanic languages are actually Turkish.

As is Latin and ... you'll certainly name a couple more.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:50 am
@2622572,
Kåldolma
is really not a Swedish dish. It has become a dish popular in Sweden, but was brought back from Turkey by Karl XII´s soldiers.
So you cannot compare Håkan or Hakon with kåldolmar.

How well do you know the Scandinavian languages?
2622572
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:51 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Does our usage of "ispiyon" (variant of the word "espionage") make the word of Turkic descent?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:53 am
@saab,
saab wrote:

How well do you know the Scandinavian languages?
And what do you know about linguistics and the history of linguistics?
2622572
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:02 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Sir, I am talking about a word, a name, being used in Nordic countries, also in hungary, not the language. So if you are interpreting my statement like this "Okay. So all Germanic languages are actually Turkish." there certainly is a problem either in my expression or in your understanding. I am talking about one single WORD not a Language. I hope I will be understood correctly this time.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:08 am
@2622572,
Hákon, Håkan, Håkon ... means "High Son" from Old Norse - (Proto-Norse hauha-) (high) and konr (kin) ...
2622572
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:15 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Unfortunately, Scandinavian languages are merely a field of interest for me since there are really no institution where I can get education of any Scandinavian language. I hope to speak Norwegian fluently some day. I am a translation and interpreting student because of my interest in the field, my mother is a Turkish Language and Literature scholar and my father is an enthusiast on this field. I am studying in the field since like I was six years old.
0 Replies
 
2622572
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:28 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Hakan: Han + Kağan
Hane: House
Hanedan: Dynasty, Dynasti

So you are saying hakan means "High son" , "of a noble family" and Hanedan means dynasty which is a variant of Han. Still coincidence?
Also -konr could have gained its meaning from this word, Chomsky states this is possible.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:39 am
@2622572,
stop arguing.
Walter is German and as far as I know his knowledge about languages are on a high level.
I am as Scandinavian as one can get and understand, write and read and spöeak Scandinavian languages.
Also had to learn some old Norse in school.
Dont argue with any of us.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:48 am
@saab,
I'm not going so harsh and actually, I just have an interest in languages.

I certainly think that many words and names are similar in different languages.
I'm just watching a football match, a Dutch player named Hüntelaar made a goal. Most certainly, his family name (roughly) means the same as mine: "behind the fields", since Frisian and Saxon were two languages very close to each other more than 1000 years ago.

I do have my doubts, the really old Norse/Scandinavic names derived from Turkish names. And I suppose, that's why linguists distinguish those similar looking Håkan and Hakan ...
0 Replies
 
2622572
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:58 am
@saab,
Walter is acting like I am trying to claim all the Germanic languages, this doesn't seem consistent, although we Turks tend to claim very much...
This seems like the Turk-o-allergy that comes with being European as a package. Accepting a words origin to be Turkic doesn't make you Turk, hell I am of Ostrogoth descent with very distinct anthropologic features but that doesn't make me not-Turk. You are what you think you are, what you want you are... Have a good day bror, this song is for you:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YtMwE8Ad7o
Dimmu Borgir, Hunnerkongens sorgsvarte ferd over Steppene
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 11:03 am
@2622572,
No. I have just doubts that around the turning point in history a Germanic name arose from Turkish origin.
2622572
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 11:10 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Native Americans had Turkic words, why not? Its not like we hadn't been in Europe...
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Håkon and Håkan, from Turkish?
Copyright © 2017 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 02/23/2017 at 12:27:56