6
   

How much money Olympics 2012 costs?

 
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Jul, 2012 01:16 pm
@cicerone imposter,
The report you linked to is on a website for "credit professionals" and is about the problems faced by people in debt who had contacted a debt advice line, not people "living in poverty". 47 pounds is about 73 US dollars.

Quote:
The average CCCS client in London had a monthly shortfall of £47, compared to an average surplus of £44 across the UK.


That's the average difference between what these people get and what they need to meet all their needs and service their borrowing, which leads to them (the people who contact the advice line) getting in debt. It doesn't say anything about the absolute levels of income. It doesn't mean they are eating scraps out of trash bins and their kids have rickets and are running around with their arses hanging out of their trousers. It probably means they let the credit card bill slide after paying for clothes, groceries, iPhone plans, rent or mortgage, cable TV and filling up the car.

The report also says that those contacting the helpline had an average unsecured debt of £17,031, that's $26,000 dollars. That's people contacting a helpline because they are unable to manage their debts, not London people in general. The figures were obtained from 11,000 people who contacted the helpline. The Greater London urban area has a population of around 8.25 million.

In a spirit of web enquiry I did a little search myself and found:

In the US, in 2012, average credit card debt per household with credit card debt: $15,956. That's the overall average debt, not the average debt of people in trouble. These will likely have bigger debts.

33% of Americans do not own a credit card.
54% pay their balance in full each month
33% carry balances up to $10,000 (median balance: $2,254)
13% carry balances over $10,000 (median balance: $17,366)

U.S. consumers racked up an estimated $51 billion worth of fast food on their personal credit and debit cards in 2006.

What that report conveys, then, is that Britain is an average aflluent Western nation, and its citizens are about average. Also the cost of living is a bit higher in London than elsewhere in Britain, (where, Americans tend to forget, another 52 million people live).

As for the TV documentary, I didn't see that.




cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Jul, 2012 03:05 pm
@contrex,
It's easy to "rationalize" any social topic by pointing the finger at others.

That's never been my intention, and even mentioned some facts about the US that is critical of our economy. The US "is" the richest country in the world with the biggest GDP, but we have an imbalance in how our riches are distributed.

If you wish to compare the differences between the US and England, you need to look at the "big" picture, and include the "averages" and "medians."

According to the following sources on GDP (ppp) per capita income, the International Monetary Fund lists the US as #6, and the UK as #22.
The World Bank lists the US as #7, and the UK as #22. The CIA World Book lists the US as #9, and the UK as #26.

No comparison.

contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Jul, 2012 03:48 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
If you wish to compare the differences between the US and England


I'm not sure what your point is... the US and Britain (that's the name of our country, by the way) are both in the category of very rich nations. Britain is one of the five over-one-trillion-dollar economies of Europe.

cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Jul, 2012 03:57 pm
@contrex,
The point is, anecdotal information about the US spending habits and debt doesn't do justice to the "big picture."

Britain may be one of five "over one trillion dollar economies of Europe," but surely you jest. The Euro is now in deep doodle, and trying to save so many Euro countries from their debt levels is a joke. Look at Greece; an economy in ruins based mostly on tourism, and a government so corrupted, they can't even clean house. The German economy is not that strong - to save the rest of Europe. They will be playing "plug the hole in the boat" for many decades to come, and it will be a wonder if that boat doesn't sink - along with the rest of the world's economy.



contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 10:56 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
Britain may be one of five "over one trillion dollar economies of Europe," but surely you jest.


You really are just posting any old stuff that comes into your head, aren't you?

cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 10:57 am
@contrex,
"Old stuff?" I'm just repeating what one of you Brits posted.

Could be old; I wouldn't know.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 11:24 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

"Old stuff?" I'm just repeating what one of you Brits posted.

Could be old; I wouldn't know.


I meant "any old" in the (possibly mainly British) idomatic sense of "random" or "chosen without discernment or thought or scruple" - e.g. "The Daily Mail is a trashy paper that will print any old rubbish".
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 11:29 am
@contrex,
Most of us Yanks wouldn't know that the "Daily Mail is a trashy paper."
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 12:46 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

Most of us Yanks wouldn't know that the "Daily Mail is a trashy paper."


Well, you do now.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 12:59 pm
@contrex,
No, I don't. I've never read the Daily Mail. When I do, I'll make up my own mind whether it's trashy or not.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 02:06 pm
It's like a British print equivalent of Fox News, like I said really trashy. Lots of negative stories about immigration and Muslims and pictures of celebrities on vacation showing muffin top or stretch marks
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 02:33 pm
@contrex,
Any other Brit want to chime in about the Daily Mail?
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 05:08 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2012 06:23 pm
@izzythepush,
We in the US have many tabloid newspapers that are sold at supermarket check outs. The top ten are,
Quote:

1. National Enquirer

2. Star Magazine

3. Weekly World News

4. New York Post

5. The Mirror

6. The Sun

7. New York Daily News

8. Globe Magazine

9. Tabloid

10. Mega Star


Never read em, but might see the first page crap while waiting in line to pay for my groceries.

Yea, FOX fits.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jul, 2012 03:36 am
@cicerone imposter,
In the 1930s The Daily Mail supported Oswald Mosely's blackshirts, and sympathised with Nazi Germany. Very little has changed since then.
0 Replies
 
 

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