28
   

The British Crown is a useless anachronism.

 
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 06:22 pm
@OmSigDAVID,

glitterbag wrote:
We use toffee, that may be the same thing.
Maybe,
I dunno.


glitterbag wrote:
Our seaside resorts sell sticks of rock,
similar to the candy canes you hang on Christmas trees.
In my experience, those were 2 different things. Christmas candy canes were unique.
Rock was amorphous, shaped like rocks.

David
[/quote]

Sorry David, I didn't make those statements , some one else did.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 06:43 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:
We use toffee, that may be the same thing.
Maybe, I dunno.


glitterbag wrote:
Our seaside resorts sell sticks of rock,
similar to the candy canes you hang on Christmas trees.
DAVID wrote:
In my experience, those were 2 different things. Christmas candy canes were unique.
Rock was amorphous, shaped like rocks.

David

glitterbag wrote:
Sorry David, I didn't make those statements, some one else did.
MY APOLOGIES, GLITTERBAG!!!
Your name must have remained in my computer's clipboard.

I was negligent in failing to make the appropriate change.

Sorry.





David
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 06:52 pm
I had to look up Plastic Paddy, never heard that before. Since every American's family members originated somewhere else, I'm not sure exactly what to make of it. There are festivals celebrating numerous countries, with authentic cuisine, music, dress, dancing etc. my parents both grew up in Baltimore, and one of the best things I thought was the diverse neighborhoods. Eastern and Western Europeans flocked to Baltimore which had a busy harbor, rail transport, markets, factories, with plenty of jobs. Children growing up in the 20's likely had parents who spoke little English, and they went to the same schools, either public or parochial. Those of us born after WWII, went to Polish, Greek, Italian weddings hosted by 1st generation who tended to follow traditions of their parents. But I don't think they were celebrated exactly as they might be in the old country.

I've never heard 3rd or 4th generation italians referred to as unauthentic or plastic, but then again I don't know how the Italians living in Italy view them.
Speaking strictly for myself, I see myself as an American of Irish heritage. Not the other way around.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 08:04 pm
@glitterbag,
I don't thinnnnnk so. Different process (in my memory) way different colors.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 11:22 pm
@ossobuco,
I'm sorry OB, I don't understand your comment. Is it disagreement on various immigrant communities in Baltimore or something else? I may have have not expressed myself correctly.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 03:19 am
@OmSigDAVID,


OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 05:25 am
@izzythepush,
THANK U VERY MUCH for your YOUTUBES.

I LOVED Them. I was a bit taken aback by the unexpected
phallic lollipop, for the ladies, no doubt.
The singer seemed to lose his English accent.
I wonder what year that was filmed.

Thanks again, Izzy.

Today is my First Anniversary of my migration to Florida!
Today begins my 2nd Year here!





David
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 05:33 am
@OmSigDAVID,
George Formby entertained the troops in the trenches during WW2, he died in 1961. I don't think he produced much in the way of colour films.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Formby
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 06:12 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

George Formby entertained the troops in the trenches during WW2, he died in 1961.
I don't think he produced much in the way of colour films.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Formby
He seems like a good fellow. I hope that he was happy.





David
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 06:56 am
Regarding "Paddy"
This is what I know.
On the Irish side of our family, the first son is named Patrick, for the Saint with a middle name of Michael.
The second son is named Michael, for the Archangel and a middle name of Patrick.
After that, all hell breaks loose with John's and Martin's and James's being the next top three contenders.
This leads to problems, of course, with keeping the cousins straight. Every family has a Patrick, every single one. And, every 18 years or so, that Patrick will have a Patrick of his own and probably a Michael soon after.
What happens is the family and the neighborhood for that matter, starts referring to the father as Pat and his son as Paddy Mike, or Paddy's Mike. Then you get Mike's Paddy, Paddy John, Paddy O, Paddy Younger, Micky's Pat, Little Paddy, Little Paddy Mike..... .

The John's are seldom John's. They are John Patrick, John Michael, John Martin and their sons are John's Paddy, Little John's Mickey....it goes on.

That's in the family and in the town.
If a stranger, trying to pick a fight in a pub, called any of my cousins, even the school teachers, a 'paddy', they would get their fight.

Joe(and a bit more)Nation

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 07:16 am
@Joe Nation,
Quote:
If a stranger, trying to pick a fight in a pub, called any of my cousins, even the school teachers, a 'paddy', they would get their fight.


Yup . . . and that's the point.

Where i lived in Ireland, we had a great many people with my first and last name. Long before i arrived, the problem was resolved by using a different name, such as the middle name. (One of them was using that name, because his first name was Christopher, but there were already several men named Chris in his family. When he moved to the town where i lived, he reverted to Chris.) You'll have that problem where everyone is obsessed with sain''s names.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 07:21 am
@Joe Nation,
Joe Nation wrote:
If a stranger, trying to pick a fight in a pub, called any of my cousins,
even the school teachers, a 'paddy', they would get their fight.

Joe(and a bit more)Nation
What 's the rationale??
In the absence of a pejorative adjective attached to the "Paddy"
what is the nature of the objection that evokes hostility and hospitals??
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 07:26 am
Paddy was long a slighting name, a disobliging name, which the English applied to every Irish male they encountered. The same was done in the United States--witness the term paddy wagon, which was a sneering term implying that all or most police officers were Irish.

It's amazing to me that you don't understand how words and names are used to hurt and insult others.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 07:39 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Paddy was long a slighting name, a disobliging name, which the English applied to every Irish male they encountered. The same was done in the United States--witness the term paddy wagon, which was a sneering term implying that all or most police officers were Irish.
For a moment, I thought u were going to refer to the passengers.



Setanta wrote:
It's amazing to me that you don't understand
how words and names are used to hurt and insult others.
Well, if someone called me: "Davy" I woud not get mad.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 07:52 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I guess i shouldn't be surprised that you don't get it. Apparently, reading comprehension is not big on your list of worthwhile accoplishments.
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 09:05 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Paddy was long a slighting name, a disobliging name, which the English applied to every Irish male they encountered. The same was done in the United States--witness the term paddy wagon, which was a sneering term implying that all or most police officers were Irish.

It's amazing to me that you don't understand how words and names are used to hurt and insult others.


Growing up in NYC, I do remember adults (of Irish descent) saying to each other, "Don't get your Irish up," meaning no need to take offense. That was the collective image amongst many non-Irish, that without any real cause, people of Irish descent see offense in innocuous comments. So, amongst those ethnic groups that had little to do with Irish New Yorkers, mum was the word. In effect, no comments were made about the Irish, good or bad. I suspect that their 19th century reputation still lived on in the collective minds of many. The Irish in NYC could bond with German Catholics, perhaps Polish Catholics. Rarely Italian Catholics. Never NYC Jews. As the song goes, "It was just one of those things." All in my opinion, naturally.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 09:10 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

The same was done in the United States--witness the term paddy wagon, which was a sneering term implying that all or most police officers were Irish.



And, I had thought it made reference to the belief that when the police came to collect those doing something questionnable, many were of Irish descent, so the vehicle that took them to the police station was given an Irish moniker.

And, as I've read in a "history" of U.S. police departments, in NYC the Irish were recruited into the young NYC police department, since non-Irish did not feel safe in Irish neighborhoods, even during daylight. The thought in the book was that politicians said, "Let them police their own."
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 12:49 pm
Maybe locality has something to do with. Although there were many Irish in Baltimore, I would be hard pressed to identify any particular group from the old country that were dominate.

I also remember my mother telling my father to not get his Irish up. But around here we also told Dad he had Irish Altzheimers, he forgot everything but the grudges. Before anyone gets insulted over the Altzheimers remark, my mother was diagnosed at 58 with early onset Altzheimers. She lived to be 72, my father was her primary care giver. There is nothing humorous about Altzheimers, it takes away everything the person ever was. Very, very, sad.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 02:58 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
I guess i shouldn't be surprised that you don't get it.
I was not surprized.




Setanta wrote:
Apparently, reading comprehension is not big on your list of worthwhile accoplishments.
Mr. Setanta, HOW can I convince u that I am not the topic of every thread?????

The subject is "The British Crown". I am not the King of England.

I can resume remarks about u too, if I feel like it.
Then u 'll call me a "bully" again.





David
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 04:52 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
What a whiner . . . you were the one who was going on about Paddy. Now you want to play like you were just discussing the thread topic.
 

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