38
   

"So, in answer to your question..."

 
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 12:45 pm
@IRFRANK,
So, meanwhile at the poolhall, the Lone Ranger was having his balls racked.
IRFRANK
 
  3  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 12:52 pm
@Ragman,
ouch

I'm going with this. I remember back in the 70's - the engineers that trained me back in the dark ages, used the term a lot.

"But in the algorithmic times that have come, “so” conveys an algorithmic certitude. It suggests that there is a right answer, which the evidence dictates and which must not be contradicted. Among its synonyms, after all, are “consequently,” “thus” and “therefore.”"

A is true and B is true, so C must also be true.

I think that was before Microsoft, but it did come from logic.
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 01:10 pm
@IRFRANK,
I am going to start my sentences from now on with 'thus.'

"How are you?"
"Thus, it starts."
"What do you mean by that? What did I say?"
"Thus, it continues, the constant stream of questions."
"I asked you how you were, you putz. I am out of here."
<door slam>
"Thus am I free."

Joe(If I had only known this a few years ago.)Nation
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 02:36 pm
I keep hearing this every day now. CBC reporter interviews a programmer, who can't go through three consecutive sentences without starting at least one of them with "so."

(Ragman, you screwed that joke up . . .

Meanwhile, back at the pool hall, Tonto, not knowing the Lone Ranger was disguised as a pool table, racked his balls.)
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 02:42 pm
@roger,
I don't think I ever use so in an attempt to make something more casual. I think I just mean it as followup to an actual or fanciful set of thoughts. Of course, I may be wrong, as I probably use it all sorts of ways.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 02:44 pm
@IRFRANK,
Agree.
But I think it prefigured (what does that mean?) the seventies.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 03:04 pm
@joefromchicago,
Sounds like another thing to add to the "get over yourself" list to me.

Adding to my own get-over-it list of annoying newisms is answering the phone when someone calls me and instead of saying hello they ask, "What's up?" Um... you called ME! It's supposedly a modern replacement for "How are you?" Drives me batty!
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 03:10 pm
@JPB,
Don't get me started. They're almost as annoying as the people who call you and start the conversation by saying "Hello? Who am I speaking to?" ("You called me, idiot! Who am I speaking to?")
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 03:10 pm
@JPB,
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 03:11 pm
@Thomas,
my answer to that is always...

if you don't know, we have no further business, good-bye now.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 08:30 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Quote:
What irritates me is the person who says, "So therefore . . .[etc.]" Seems to me in this context


You're wrong, Merry, because you've given no context. This is the way that these silly prescriptions get started. Where did you hear this one from?

You're not a hypocrite in this posting but don't let that get you down for you do hypocrite really well.

0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 09:16 pm
@Setanta,
My pool cue is bent,
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 07:35 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
Actually i have noticed it for a while now, and have come to the conclusion that the speaker often uses "so" when they don't intend to answer a question or criticism.


I haven't noticed Joe's 'so' used in that manner.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 11:01 am
@JTT,
Quote:
Actually i have noticed it for a while now, and have come to the conclusion that the speaker often uses "so" when they don't intend to answer a question or criticism.


I wrote:

I haven't noticed Joe's 'so' used in that manner.

Let me amend that.

I haven't noticed Joe's 'so' used in that manner, though it's certainly a possibility.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 11:03 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
I keep hearing this every day now. CBC reporter interviews a programmer, who can't go through three consecutive sentences without starting at least one of them with "so."


That's the funny thing about changes to a language, Set - people use them.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 06:51 pm
If one Googles, "So, how's by you?" a few references will show up, including this one:
http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/932607094/m/3991065133
I am old enough to remember the old black and white tv sitcom The Goldbergs, where Molly Picon, as Mrs. Goldberg, leaning on her elbows at her window to speak to a neighbor would ask, "So, how's by you?" This might have been a translation from the Yiddish, which is just a dialect of German.

There are influences on the language that many are not aware of. For example, the Eastern European syntax is the basis for the humorous phrase, "I threw my mother from the train a kiss."

It is also my opinion that the expression that seems to be omnipresent, "Oh my God!!!" was started by (you guessed it) the 1970's Jewish Princess. It became omnipresent in the vernacular maybe a decade or two later by mostly girls. It reminds me of how the bagel became a New York bread. OMG.

Anyway, "So" existed way before the 21st century, in a demographic far afield from where it is now used; perhaps overused?

joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 08:35 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
Anyway, "So" existed way before the 21st century

Well duh!

Let me be perfectly clear: I'm well aware that "so" is not a neologism, and that it has many perfectly good uses. I'm solely interested in answers to questions that begin with "so," such as in the following example:

"How do you get from here to there?"
"So, the first thing you do..."
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 08:37 pm
@JTT,
yeah.

Joe(Certainly is)Nation
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 08:50 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:

Foofie wrote:
Anyway, "So" existed way before the 21st century

Well duh!

Let me be perfectly clear: I'm well aware that "so" is not a neologism, and that it has many perfectly good uses. I'm solely interested in answers to questions that begin with "so," such as in the following example:

"How do you get from here to there?"
"So, the first thing you do..."


My point was that I believe it could very well reflect the English that Jewish New Yorkers spoke in the first half of the 20th century when many still spoke with a sing-song Yiddish accent. Many people that use it today would not likely know it was once the standard phraseology of the Lower East Side.

Starting a sentence with "so" is part of many a Jewish joke. "So, how's your son?" - "So, things could be worse" - etc., etc.

Ragman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2012 07:43 am
@Foofie,
So, who gives a ****?
0 Replies
 
 

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