38
   

"So, in answer to your question..."

 
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 02:11 pm
So, I use it a lot. When I use it at the start of an exchange, I'm usually trying to make my comment sound more casual. If I use it to start the last sentence of an exchange, it means "therefore" or "in summation." So that's what I usually mean.

So, do you have a problem with that? (And sometimes I use it in response to another when their statement isn't very clear.)
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 02:20 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
So, is this a new thing? And what can we do to stop it?

I think it's just another filler, similar to "uhm", "weeell", and (in the middle of the sentence) "like". One filler is as good as any other to me, so I feel no desire to, like, stop it.
Val Killmore
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 02:42 pm
@Joe Nation,
Ya, the fill-in words that I hear a lot is "uuumm"
As if they were in Buddhist meditation.


with Ladies in a natural conversation it is:
like...
like...
like...
like, like, like Wink


I guess it gives them a minute to think.

Although in my case, it is silences in conversation (sometimes awkward silences), to get me thinking before I talk further.

0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 02:54 pm
@Eva,
Eva wrote:

So, I use it a lot. When I use it at the start of an exchange, I'm usually trying to make my comment sound more casual. If I use it to start the last sentence of an exchange, it means "therefore" or "in summation." So that's what I usually mean.

So, do you have a problem with that? (And sometimes I use it in response to another when their statement isn't very clear.)

No, but then that doesn't sound like you're starting answers to questions with "so." I don't have any quarrel with the usual usage of the word "so," just with using it to start answers to basic who-what-where-why-how questions.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 02:56 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
I think it's just another filler, similar to "uhm", "weeell", and (in the middle of the sentence) "like". One filler is as good as any other to me, so I feel no desire to, like, stop it.

I think that's right, and the times I've heard "so" used at the beginning of a response, I think it is taking the place of "well." I'm just wondering if that's something new among the young'ns.
Val Killmore
 
  0  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 03:06 pm
@joefromchicago,
Among the young'ns, "like" and "OMG" surpasses "so"

If you are going to speak to a person or a group professionally it is essential to practice such fillers out of your tongue. You need to be solid on the subjects being discussed in order to avoid those problems.

I can't believe the nerve of president of Chicago Public Schools using filler words.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  3  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 04:39 pm
What irritates me is the person who says, "So therefore . . .[etc.]" Seems to me in this context "so" and "therefore" are synonims and do not deserve to be juxtaposed in that fashion. (I once had a boss who did this constantly. Drove me nuts.) (I'm sure JTT will be along shortly to tell me why I'm wrong to feel that way and inform me that I'm a hypocrite as well.)
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 05:00 pm
@Joe Nation,
I use it the same way you do (I think), JoeN. Also maybe from Vonnegut.

If I take the time after I've written to review, I often cull filler words. But I type as I am thinking and a lot of mulch gets mixed in with the nuggets of opinion.
So, then what? Then so stays.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 05:06 pm
@ossobuco,
I'll add that I like taut writing, but I also like other modes from time to time.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 08:10 pm
Now i'm hearing it all over the place. On the world news on CBC tonight, their financial correspondent answering every leading question with: "So . . ."
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 08:15 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
I'm just wondering if that's something new among the young'ns.

My St.Louis friends have been using it since the 1980s. ("So, what are you doing this summer?") They are either of my generation or the next older generation. Maybe it's a local thing that has recently been spreading into new localities?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 08:27 pm
I think that there is some confusion as to which 'so' this is.

Maybe me too. Smile

I'd say that it started sometime after the late 1980s. When it became commonplace, I'm not at all sure.

Quote:
So new?

August 22, 2010 @ 9:14 am · Filed by Mark Liberman under Linguistic history, Pragmatics



David Craig asked whether Anand Giridharadas is suffering from the Recency Illusion in his small piece on "so" (Follow My Logic? A Connective Word Takes the Lead, NYT 5/21/2010), which observes that

“So” may be the new “well,” “um,” “oh” and “like.” No longer content to lurk in the middle of sentences, it has jumped to the beginning, where it can portend many things: transition, certitude, logic, attentiveness, a major insight. […]

Giridharadas disarms antedating by citation:

One can dredge up ancient instances of “so” as a sentence starter. In his 14th-century poem “Troilus and Criseyde,” Chaucer launched a verse with, “So on a day he leyde him doun to slepe. …” But for most of its life, “so” has principally been a conjunction, an intensifier and an adverb.

What is new is its status as the favored introduction to thoughts, its encroachment on the territory of “well,” “oh,” “um” and their ilk.

So it is widely believed that the recent ascendancy of “so” began in Silicon Valley. The journalist Michael Lewis picked it up when researching his 1999 book “The New New Thing”: “When a computer programmer answers a question,” he wrote, “he often begins with the word ‘so.’ ” Microsoft employees have long argued that the “so” boom began with them.

And it's wonderful to see that he cites a linguist, Galina Bolden, and links to one of several papers that she's written on the subject ("Implementing incipient actions: The discourse marker ‘so’ in English conversation", Journal of Pragmatics 41:974–998, 2009).

However, Bolden's work doesn't address the recency question, as far as I've found; and as Giridharadas recognizes, her analysis of so doesn't seem to be quite the same as the one that he puts forward:

But in the algorithmic times that have come, “so” conveys an algorithmic certitude. It suggests that there is a right answer, which the evidence dictates and which must not be contradicted. Among its synonyms, after all, are “consequently,” “thus” and “therefore.”

And yet Galina Bolden, a linguistics scholar who has studied of recorded ordinary conversations and has written academic papers on the use of “so,” believes that “so” is also about the culture of empathy that is gaining steam as the world embraces the increasing complexity of human backgrounds and geographies.

...

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=2570
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 08:32 pm
@JTT,
oh look

just what MA said but needlessly stretched out
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 09:08 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
My St.Louis friends have been using it since the 1980s. ("So, what are you doing this summer?")

I'm just realizing that this example isn't in answer to a question. But they used it in answers to questions, too.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 09:19 pm
@ehBeth,
Beth, if you actually had a grasp of how language worked, you'd be more involved in the language threads and you'd provide some schooling to Setanta.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 09:44 pm
@Thomas,
That's kind of what I meant in my example. They are probably planning to extend an invitation, and want it to sound like a casual thing.
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 10:17 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:
So it is widely believed that the recent ascendancy of “so” began in Silicon Valley. The journalist Michael Lewis picked it up when researching his 1999 book “The New New Thing”: “When a computer programmer answers a question,” he wrote, “he often begins with the word ‘so.’ ” Microsoft employees have long argued that the “so” boom began with them.

Yes. That's exactly what I'm talking about. Figures it would start with Microsoft.
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 11:49 pm
@joefromchicago,
So so and so's say so , so?
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 09:20 am
For the briefest of moments before he opened the bedroom door, James heard two voices.
"So."
~~
Charlotte walked briskly down the hall, out the doors and down the hill to the back of the gym. She rounded the corner and spotted Cynthia coming out of the equipment room.
"So!"

~~
There were three lines carved into this particular desk.
"We can see by this series of equations", the chalk clacked and scraped against the blackboard and made a kind of shriek as Dr. Binder circled the grouping, "the Universe is flat and the Universe is spinning."
Mason slumped a little further down in his seat. "So?"


Joe(you take it from there)Nation
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 10:21 am
Like, so what ?

man
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/18/2019 at 01:17:41