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What are the Pros and Cons of moving to Costa Rica?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 09:31 pm
Whoppee...

tell us more should you be so inclined.
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 09:32 pm
Not much to tell, our company has offices here in Costa Rica. I manage the software development and I am hiring developers here. I told my CEO that I'd be interested in spending some time here in Costa Rica with my team and he said to stay as long as I'd like.

So I took him up on the offer and came down this weekend.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 09:37 pm
Sounds good, even great.

O'Bill hasn't posted for a while, but just did a day or two ago, on the Europe 2007 meeting date (hah) thread - or perhaps you know that. Probably busy with the next restaurant development.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 09:38 pm
Craven de Kere wrote:
Not much to tell, our company has offices here in Costa Rica. I manage the software development and I am hiring developers here. I told my CEO that I'd be interested in spending some time here in Costa Rica with my team and he said to stay as long as I'd like.

So I took him up on the offer and came down this weekend.



So...what is Costa Rica like?


Can you manage in Spanish?


Shall you be a happy little vegemite? Feel more like home?
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 11:09 pm
Costa Rica is a fairly well developed country and stands out in Central America for their progressive politics (heavy emphasis on education, regional foreign politics have had a profound effect on the rest of Central America).

Their people are latin, friendly and I like it here. The food is bland (not very well-spiced) but it's healthy "earth food" and I like it. It will be a welcome break from the richer foods I tended to eat in America.

I started speaking Spanish today, and within a few weeks I'll be fluent (the similarities between Spanish and Portuguese are greater than any other major languages I know of).

I don't really have a cultural home (been called a foreigner everywhere) but I'm very comfortable in latin cultures. That may not be saying much because I don't recall a country whose culture I was not comfortable with.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 11:13 pm
How interesting, Craven. I thought you were still in San Diego, or thereaboiuts. Anyway, Costa Rica has always sounded good, at least in the higher elevations.

Hey, in high school, I could mangle in Spanish, too.
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Oct, 2006 11:23 pm
roger wrote:
How interesting, Craven. I thought you were still in San Diego, or thereaboiuts.


Until Friday I was, and I still have a lot of stuff (including a car I'm still paying for) there so it's still kinda the case here.

Quote:
Anyway, Costa Rica has always sounded good, at least in the higher elevations.


Yup, it's pretty temperate in San Jose, and I'd not live here if it had to be down at sea level.
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Clary
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 12:59 am
Oh good, more on Costa Rica. I shall swallow my fear and loathing of longhaul flights to visit it within the next couple of years. I wonder if there are Spanish language schools - travelling on one's own can be boring and you don't really get more than a glimpse of the culture - and also wonder if San Jose or some other city would be a good place to base myself.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 01:30 am
Craven de Kere wrote:
Costa Rica is a fairly well developed country and stands out in Central America for their progressive politics (heavy emphasis on education, regional foreign politics have had a profound effect on the rest of Central America).

Their people are latin, friendly and I like it here. The food is bland (not very well-spiced) but it's healthy "earth food" and I like it. It will be a welcome break from the richer foods I tended to eat in America.

I started speaking Spanish today, and within a few weeks I'll be fluent (the similarities between Spanish and Portuguese are greater than any other major languages I know of).

I don't really have a cultural home (been called a foreigner everywhere) but I'm very comfortable in latin cultures. That may not be saying much because I don't recall a country whose culture I was not comfortable with.



Are you saying their progressive politics have had a profound effect on the rest of central America, or something else?
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najmelliw
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 02:24 am
Craven de Kere wrote:

I don't really have a cultural home (been called a foreigner everywhere) but I'm very comfortable in latin cultures. That may not be saying much because I don't recall a country whose culture I was not comfortable with.


Try the Netherlands, Craven. First of all, I don't think we even have a culture. Second, if there is such a thing as a Dutch culture, I think that
deep, deep, down, most dutch people don't even like it. They hide that
feeling well though.
Isn't it odd that a cultured and intelligent individual such as nimh, dutch
by rearing, is now living in Eastern Europe? Hmm? Just goes to prove my
point.

Naj.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 03:06 am
I would have thought that you had a very strong culture...it certainly seems that way to foreigners (I have a friend who lived in Holland for some years).

I think it is hard to see your own culture!

But you are being ironic, no?
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 10:55 am
This move sounds most excellent.

Congrats/good luck/whoopee!
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najmelliw
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 12:09 pm
Well, it took me a while before I could read that reply!
Anyways, perhaps a little bit of irony... But there is a seed of hard, undeniable truth as well.
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fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 12:43 pm
Craven, congratulations!

I know you'll be fine in Costa Rica, as any Brazilian would (IMHO, you're more Brazilian than anything else).

You'll speak fluent Spanish in no time, I tell ya.

Will you be a Saprissa fan?
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 07:56 pm
fbaezer wrote:
Craven, congratulations!

I know you'll be fine in Costa Rica, as any Brazilian would (IMHO, you're more Brazilian than anything else).



Would being Brazilian, in your view, differ much from being, say, Mexican, or Costa Rican?
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 08:06 pm
fbaezer wrote:
Will you be a Saprissa fan?


Dunno, I haven't been watching football much in years (or any sport for that matter) and the little I've seen from Costa Rican football was pretty weak.

But maybe I'd go with the team from the place where I live (Escazu) and root for the Brujas.

Any reason you picked Saprissa?
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fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 08:14 pm
Depends on what part of Brazil (or Mexico) you are from. Laughing

Latin Americans have a lot in common, but...

IMO, Craven is not much like the Cariocas I've met, but rather like the Paulistas, which is, in a sense, closer to big city Mexicans than to Cariocas.

Costa Ricans would be half way between Mineiros and Cariocas (somewhat tamer and provincial, but with zest), which would mean like Mexicans of the relatively small Gulf cities. Got it?

I bet Craven got it.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 08:43 pm
fbaezer wrote:
Depends on what part of Brazil (or Mexico) you are from. Laughing

Latin Americans have a lot in common, but...

IMO, Craven is not much like the Cariocas I've met, but rather like the Paulistas, which is, in a sense, closer to big city Mexicans than to Cariocas.

Costa Ricans would be half way between Mineiros and Cariocas (somewhat tamer and provincial, but with zest), which would mean like Mexicans of the relatively small Gulf cities. Got it?

I bet Craven got it.



I am sure he did, but I, as a humble, provincial Australian, still do not.


Only answer if you can be bothered.....but I AM interested...... what are Minieros, Cariocas and paulistas!!!!!
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OCCOM BILL
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Oct, 2006 06:14 am
Pura Vida Amigo! No, I'm not in Costa Rica presently. Instead I made the error of going into the restaurant business in Wisconsin. Damn near broke now. Knowing you're there makes me want to re-visit twice as bad as ever. I may still find a reasonable way to become a Tico yet! I'll chat more with you soon. Meanwhile, be sure and visit Ram Luna. Best view of any restaurant on planet earth (as far as I know). (Take a cab, or you'll never find it... or your way back). Escazu is a hop skip and a jump from Irazu where I've stayed! Find a black girl in the bar at the Best Western named Lucy and tell her you're a friend of Bill Ward's who traveled there twice with the very big Asian gentleman and you'll make a great friend who can show you the local cool spots. (Trust me, she'll remember) It's late, and I need rest for an important meeting later this morning but I'll chat more soon.
Pura Vida, Amigo!

Ps., If you haven't already picked up Lonely Planet's Costa Rica phrase book, do so tomorrow. You'll be glad you did.
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fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Oct, 2006 12:56 pm
dlowan wrote:




Only answer if you can be bothered.....but I AM interested...... what are Minieros, Cariocas and paulistas!!!!!


From the basis Brazilians are generally light, easy going types.

Cariocas: from Rio de Janeiro, the more fun, shrewd easy going ones.
Mineiros: from Minas Gerais, provincial, somewhat religious.
Paulistas: from Sao Paolo, hardworking and serious, for Brazilian standards (which would still mean fun and easy going for most of developed countries).
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