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St. Patrick's Day Recipes

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 01:04 am
I've been reading lately about how different parts of the u.s. are. Of course I knew this already, but in many ways I didn't.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 01:08 am
Corned beef and cabbage is very popular on the East Coast, especially with the New York and Massachusetts Irish-Americans.

My dad's side of the family usually celebrated St. Patty's day with corned beef and cabbage and the tradition continued throughout most of my life. This year I'll be cooking it in remembrance of my dad.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 01:32 am
@Butrflynet,
I do like corned beef a lot myself..
Corned beef and cabbage from my husband's father, that's a yes, but a lot of that was avoiding the mustard jello.
Not kidding.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  3  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 02:26 am
@msolga,
I try not to eat stuff once it starts turning green.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 06:43 am
@Ceili,
when I worked in Ireland I was always greeted by the smell of cabbage boiling in something every morning about 8 AM. Imagine waking up to that. Even one of my ENglish geotechies used to comment about the need for a "cabbage free zone" somewhere in Ireland
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 04:44 pm
@Butrflynet,
I've never been too crazy about corned beef and cabage but Marco said he's going to be cooking that day and I would like his, making it with potatoes and turnips.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 05:09 pm
@jcboy,
bleeccchhhh.

How about Gallway mussels and corn bread?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 05:10 pm
@farmerman,
howsabout a nice corned beef on rye with lotsa mustard and fresh dill
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 05:25 pm
@ehBeth,
maybe with Russian, sorta like a reuben, certainly , but not boiled with cabbage and pickling spices and potatoes. HAve we no senses of taste??

We used to amke this as a traditional St Paddys meal and I think I even asked for recipes herein. However, Ive never tasted any CB&C that is edible.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 05:37 pm
@farmerman,
I'm with ya. I understand Guinness, but I don't understand corned beef and cabbage.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 07:49 pm
Has anyone had any success with soda bread?

The only time I've made it, from a carefully followed recipe - it turned out like rocks!
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 07:50 pm
@margo,
and what's wrong with rocks... ?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 07:58 pm
@Rockhead,
Density
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 08:00 pm
@roger,
that's our destiny...
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 08:44 pm
@margo,
Ummm...I love Irish soda bread. But I buy mine, it's easier, and I don't have to worry how it will turn out.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 08:59 pm
@farmerman,
Galway - my father edited/repaired-hopeless film, a picture when he was at RKO ny, late 40's, called Hills of Ireland. Shown in catholic schools but that's only my experience - might have been where he sent the film promotionally.. A famous narrator though, at the time.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 09:00 pm
@margo,
I might have tried making it once a long time ago.

Rocks.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Mar, 2012 11:29 am
I asked the ghost of my mother if I could share her recipe for Old Country Bread (not Irish Bread, there is, according to the real Irish, only ONE Old Country, Ireland), but she said "No".

Then I asked her if the Irish ate Corned Beef and Cabbage, she said:

"Only the ones in hell."

Joe(I'll ask again, Margo, I know the secret)Nation
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Mar, 2012 01:30 pm
@margo,
Here's an Irish-American version from King Arthur Flour. It has more of a cake texture.

Quote:
St. Patrick's Day Irish-American Soda Bread

Irish-American soda bread is a sweeter, lighter, more interesting riff on the original Irish soda bread, a simple combination of flour, salt, baking soda, and buttermilk. No eggs, no sugar, no raisins or caraway seeds... all of those came later. And in America, land of "too much is just enough," the formula became richer still, with the addition of butter, and yet more sugar. The following soda bread tastes like a sweet, rich scone, a tiny bit crumbly but moist enough to hold together nicely when it's sliced. We bake it in a tall, round pan, to give it its classic shape. Though you can use raisins or currants, we prefer the tinier currants, as they spread themselves more evenly throughout the loaf.

6 tablespoons (3 ounces) butter
3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces) sugar
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups (12 3/4 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) buttermilk (or 1 cup milk + 1/2 cup yogurt)
1 cup (5 ounces) currants or golden raisins, firmly packed
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
1 tablespoon milk, for glaze
1 tablespoon coarse sugar, for topping

In a large bowl, beat together the butter and sugar until smooth. Add the eggs, and beat on high speed until the mixture is thick and light-colored, about 2 minutes. Stir in the baking powder, baking soda, and salt, then 1 cup of the flour. Gently beat in half the buttermilk (or milk/yogurt mixture), then another cup of the flour. Add the remainder of the buttermilk, and the final cup of flour, mixing until smooth. Stir in the currants and caraway seeds.

Spoon the mixture into a lightly greased 8" x 3 1/2" round pan (or a 9" x 3" round pan), one whose capacity is at least 5 1/2 cups. A souffle pan or panettone pan is a good choice. Drizzle the milk atop the batter, and sprinkle with the sugar.

Bake the bread in a preheated 325°F oven for 1 hour 15 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Tent a sheet of aluminum foil over the top for the final 15 minutes, if it appears to be browning too quickly. Remove the bread from the oven, wait about 5 minutes, then carefully turn it out onto a rack to cool. Allow the bread to cool for at least 1 hour before slicing. Yield: about 12 servings.

Alternatively, spoon the batter into a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan. Bake the bread in a preheated 375°F oven for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until a cake tester inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.


And here's their version of the Irish Soda Bread with a few improvements to give it more moisture:

Quote:
Irish Soda Bread

The "real" Irish soda bread consists simply of Irish "wholemeal" flour (equivalent to a coarse grind of our American whole wheat flour), baking soda, salt and buttermilk. At the other end of the spectrum is Americanized Irish soda bread, a white, sweet, cake-like confection filled with raisins or currants and caraway seeds. The version we print here is much closer to traditional Irish bread than to its American cousin.

However, the addition of some bread flour, an egg, butter, a bit of sugar and some currants serve to lighten and tenderize this loaf just enough to make it attractive to most of us on this side of the ocean.

The craggy crust on this hearty, dense bread makes it somewhat tough to cut in thin slices; we suggest using a serrated knife to cut wedge-shaped pieces. A bit of butter or jam is a nice addition.

2 1/2 cups (12 3/8 ounces) King Arthur 100% White Whole Wheat Flour
1 1/4 cups (5 7/8 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached Special Bread Flour
3 tablespoons (1 1/4 ounces) sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup (3 ounces) currants or raisins
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick, 2 ounces) cold butter, cut into 8 pieces
1 1/3 cups (11 3/4 ounces) buttermilk
1 large egg

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together the flours, sugar, baking soda, salt, and currants or raisins. Using a mixer, a pastry fork or blender, or your fingers, cut in the butter until itÕs evenly distributed and no large chunks remain.

In a separate bowl (or in a measuring cup) whisk together the buttermilk and egg. Pour this mixture into the dry ingredients and mix to combine. The dough will be stiff; if it's too crumbly to squeeze together, add another tablespoon or two of buttermilk.

Knead the dough a couple of times to make sure it's holding together, then shape it into a ball. Flatten the ball slightly, and place the loaf in a lightly greased 8- or 9-inch round cake pan, or in a similar pan; it won't spread much, so the pan doesn't have to be large. Use a sharp knife to cut a 1/2-inch deep cross, extending all the way to the edges, atop the loaf.

Bake the bread in a preheated 400°F oven for 45 to 55 minutes, until it's golden brown and a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Remove the bread from the oven, and brush the top with melted butter, if desired. Yield: about 12 servings.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Mar, 2012 01:44 pm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corned_beef
Alrighty, according to the above, and as I suspected, Corned Beef is not considered a national dish in Ireland. It became popular in the N. America because it was cheaper than bacon (more typically served with cabbage). Because beef was expensive in Ireland (herds were owned by the British landowners who preferred their serfs eat potatoes, dirt and grass- much cheaper) it was rarely eaten by the great unwashed. It became a favourite on this side of the pond because it was now affordable, a treat - believe it or not.
 

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