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One Cheeky Headline Gets ESPN Management Fired Up

 
 
maxdancona
 
  4  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 05:45 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:

Who the **** gave you the right to try to goose step the rest of us into your egalitarian utopia? If you want to get all prissy with your language I will think less of you but that is your right. However I own my own mouth, and it will produce the words I want it to.


I have no problem with that. I believe in free speech.You can go around saying any word you want.

Of course free speech works because it works both ways. You can go around saying any word you want. But, of course, if you want to go around calling people "nigger" and "fag" I have the right to point out how uncivil and bigoted you are being. I won't be able to put you in jail, in fact I don't think you should be put in jail and because I strongly believe in free speech I would fight very hard to defend your right to be as uncivil and bigoted as you want.

However, I also have the right to free speech. I can condemn you for using bigoted and racist words. And, if you are a business using words like "nigger" and "fag" I can suggest that people stop using your services. Most people don't want to shop at racist businesses and that is their right.

Of course business owners have the right to make sure that the employees whose job it is to speak for them don't use offensive terms on company time.

As a private citizen you can use the word "Chink" all you want. I might use my free speech to express my opinion that you are being uncivil and bigoted, but I don't have the power to stop you from being uncivil and bigoted and I don't even want it.

But if you someone who is working for me uses the word "Chink" on the job in a way that threatens my business, I will fire their ass pretty quickly (as is my right). And that is all that happened here.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 06:43 am
@maxdancona,
i would never advocate hate speech (although i think it's definition can be too broadly applied at times, but the same can be said for many laws), and i try to be as considerate of peoples situations as i can, that being said, i like talk radio and edgy talk radio at that, the special interest groups (who often have no other interest in a show but to censor them) dictate too much the language shows can use

thank god for satellite radio where for the most part you can discuss a topic with some honesty and not have to worry that every little remark you make is going to result in a firing or suspension followed by the fake apology

i must admit, there is one group of people i find completely reprehensible and have advocated long and loud for some kind of final solution to be applied, the human being
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 09:45 am
@djjd62,
I have no problem with edgy talk radio. If you want to hear offensive loudmouthed idiots than you know where to go. I support this as much as I support any other type of free speech.

The only problem I have with what you are saying is your use of the term "special interest groups".

You are the special interest group here; objecting to a private network's decision to manage their own employees.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 10:02 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
You are the special interest group here; objecting to a private network's decision to manage their own employees.


Given that American Journalism is in the ICU ward, and is not expected to live, this is what it boils down to. Champions of free speech and the free exchange of ideas are few and far between. The corporate class is not interested in such things....it gets in the way of making money.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 11:27 pm
@hawkeye10,
George Takei's take on the racial slur.


The rest of the entry is worth a read, too.

Quote:
...

We are at a tipping point in our society, when an African American can become President and an Asian American man can become a basketball superstar. It is an exciting time, but it brings out the stupid in many. When you see or hear it happen, don’t stand idly by. Say something, challenge them, make a difference.

Trust me, it feels Linsational.

–GHT
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 22 Feb, 2012 01:54 am
@DrewDad,
Go ahead, say something. You will not like my response though, but that is OK.
djjd62
 
  0  
Reply Wed 22 Feb, 2012 05:54 am
U.S. Rep. Judy Chu slams ESPN for racist Jeremy Lin headline

“I think that the use of the term is appalling and offensive,” said Ms. Chu in an appearance on MSNBC Monday. “The ‘c’ word is for Asian Americans like the ‘n’ word is for African Americans.”

http://www.thestatecolumn.com/articles/2012/02/20/u-s-rep-judy-chu-slams-espn-for-racist-jeremy-lin-headline/

so only asian americans can call people cunts?, now we have two "C" words, lets do a way with words all together and just use letters

w a w w i w b
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Wed 22 Feb, 2012 07:59 am
@hawkeye10,
Using racial slurs to make a supposedly cute headline is not promoting the "free exchange of ideas" but you are correct that the corporate class is not interested in defending the right to offend people - it does get in the way of making money and that is the purpose of a corporation. The headline writer has one job - come up with clever headlines without crossing any boundaries. It isn't his free speech platform, it is ESPN's platform. He can go out and speak all he wants on his own time but his job at ESPN was to make headlines to their standards. He failed. The concept that you can use your employer's resources to spread your beliefs (any sort of beliefs) and not expect to be reprimanded doesn't make much sense to me. I would expect if you used the office printer to burn off 1000 color copies of a brochure for your religion, political campaign, etc you would hear about it pretty quickly. It may be your free speech but your boss doesn't have to support it for you. If you want to show some sympathy, show it to the poor announcer who got reamed for essentially reading the script in front of him.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Feb, 2012 08:18 am
@hawkeye10,
I won't care about your response; you've proven yourself to be completely irrelevant.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Feb, 2012 02:19 am
Quote:
Perhaps it was inevitable that a Jeremy Lin pun would eventually breach the boundaries of good taste. Last Friday, after the Lin-fueled New York Knicks had their seven-game winning streak stopped by the lowly New Orleans Hornets, ESPN.com’s mobile site posted a game recap and Lin photo alongside the headline “Chink in the Armor.” The phrasing was only up for around 30 minutes, but that was plenty of time to aggrieve a rainbow coalition of fans and commentators, who declared it a bad choice of words at best and a smirky, passive aggressive racist dig at worst. ESPN quickly apologized and fired the contrite headline writer. The network also handed out a 30-day suspension to anchor Max Bretos, who had used the same phrase on air earlier in the week.
ESPN’s efforts are commendable, but these incidents suggest that it’s time to retire chink in the armor from the lexicon for good. Yes, I know that phrase has no racial connotations, but it uses the same exact word as the racial slur, for God’s sake. Having been called a chink a few times in my life—an Asian-American rite of passage that usually coincides with puberty—I don’t like hearing it, regardless of context, any more than a homosexual might like hearing the word for a bundle of kindling.
I cringed during the last presidential campaign when the Huffington Post wrote about “the chink in Obama’s armor.” (We presumably already knew about the chink in Hillary Clinton’s armor: disgraced fundraiser Norman Hsu, no relation.) I cringed when ESPN posted the same headline during the Beijing Olympics on a story about the U.S. men’s basketball team. And I shook my head when my ****-stirring former editor at the Seattle Weekly headlined a 2008 blog entry about the city’s resident baseball star “A Chink in Ichiro’s Defensive Armor.”
And I cringed last week when ESPN’s Bretos asked Knicks great Clyde Frazier if Lin had any “chinks in his armor.” I think most people, including me, chalked it up to an unfortunate and ill-timed turn of phrase, one that’s as much a cliché in the sports world as overcoming adversity. I didn’t think he needed to be suspended. And the fact that Bretos’ wife is Asian does help his defense. But doesn’t Bretos’ suspension suggest that we’re better off not using the word at all?
Chink dates back half a millennium to Middle English, a delightfully onomatopoeic word for a narrow opening or fissure. It’s also an agreed-upon slur, although those origins aren’t as clear. One theory is that it refers to the phenotype of Asiatic eyes. Or it might stem from the sound created by Chinese workers as they hammered railroad ties during America’s westward expansion. Or it’s a derivation of China or the Qing dynasty that reigned when the country first opened itself to the West.
Chink’s long history shouldn’t protect it from obsolescence. There’s a precedent for retiring offensive-sounding words from everyday usage. A quick search reveals that there has been but a single use of fagot in the New York Times since 1981 (compared with hundreds before). Dyke has quietly morphed to dike when describing the hydrological feature common in lowland countries. There’s also a rumor that the Dallas Morning News banned niggardly after negative reactions to its appearance in a food review in the 1990s, though Editor-in-chief Bob Mong tells me that it’s not true. Nothing in the Morning News’ style guide would prevent its use, but, because “it’s not really in the vernacular” and has acquired “explosive qualities,” Mong says, most editors would shy away from it. “You’d have to have an awfully good reason to use it,” he explains.
In 1999, David Howard, a white Washington, D.C., agency director, famously resigned amid the outcry following his use of the word niggardly in reference to a budget matter. For all the moaning about political correctness run amok in the reaction to Howard, who was later rehired, it pretty much took niggardly out of the public lexicon. Except when quoting sources or in stories referring to the Howard incident, the Washington Post has used niggardly only once since 1999; the term appeared dozens of times from 1990 to 1999. And for all the arguments that it’s a perfectly good word, I’m still waiting for the editor who dares to pen a headline describing one of President Obama’s policies as niggardly.
And yet the Post has printed chink more than 20 times since April 15, 2008, when it ran a story about the controversy surrounding a Philadelphia restaurant named “Chink’s Steaks.” The founder, not Asian, was given the nickname as a child for “his slanty eyes.” The story explained that “the problem is that the term ‘chink’ is every bit as racist and hurtful to Asian Americans as ‘the n-word’ is to African Americans.” So if mere homophones can be editorially quarantined, why not a certain homonym, too? (Same goes, I’d argue, for spic-and-span and gobbledygook.)
As a writer, my sensitivity to chink causes no small amount of cognitive dissonance. But this isn’t an argument against free speech. It’s not shrinking the language—it’s evolving it. Sadly, there is no analogous slur for white people to help explain what it feels like to be subjected to one, nothing that succinctly and pejoratively diminishes you just for the color of your skin. But I bet if such a word did exist, you wouldn’t see it in headlines.
It should be pointed out that when Jeremy Lin was 15 years old, his Xanga handle was “ChinkBalla88.” I still don’t like it, but it’s different when he uses it, just as it’s different when African Americans use the N-word. Chinese-pop superstar Wang Lee Hom has tried to make chink edgy and cool, referring to his music as “chinked out” and encouraging the use of chink in place of nigga.* A few years ago, Chinese-American rapper Jin put out a track called “Still a Chink.” But thankfully as far as I’m concerned, these attempts to reclaim the word haven’t taken off. And if headline writers would oblige, we just might be able to wipe away the word completely

http://www.slate.com/articles/sports/the_good_word/2012/02/chink_in_the_armor_jeremy_lin_why_it_s_time_to_retire_the_phrase_for_good_.html?wpisrc=slate_river
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