3
   

Martian Brain Remains Fell To Morocco?

 
 
bewildered
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 04:36 am
@farmerman,
The particles marked in this photo:
Edit [Moderator]: Link removed

resemble the neurons shown here:
http://www.vetmed.vt.edu/education/Curriculum/VM8054/Labs/Lab9/IMAGES/GRAY%20AND%20WHITE%20A.jpg

If moderator deletes my photo, just identify the black star-shaped particles in here:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/LvMS-Lvm.jpg

Remember to provide a micrograph to substantiate your claim for minerals when you take apart the micrograph mineral by mineral.


farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 04:55 am
@bewildered,
why must I provide a thin section when Im discussing yours?
Its obvious that the specimen youve included has several things going
1The circular white forms in photo A are air bubbles on the balsam or the clear mounting media. You can see in the second foto, WHICH is under cross nichols, that these "round areas go to extinction and have "shiny cruciform rays consistent with round air bubbles". The other dark and light shards (including the star shaped items) are leucocratic and melanocratic minerals consistent with the melt.
Id say that these were a series of pyroxene minerals that Id need to see go full cycle on the stage to define their extinction angle. The whites are probably feldpathoids like Bytownite or Anorthite. The temperature of this melt was probably quartz poor and therefore at a temp of over 1500 C. Depending on the grain size its either a diabase or a basaltic melt or even a serpentinite.


Your problem is that you dont have the necessary skills to determine what it is your actually looking at, so you are coming up with these wild conjectures.
Youre not being very convincing when you actually look at your stuff. Any kid who just finished micro petrolgy 201 could argue what youve seen better than you.

Trust me, its nothing alien, it merely a series of rocks with the crystal components therein.
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 08:44 am
@farmerman,
If I was Bewildered I would accuse you of not being a biologist and not knowing what a neuron looks like. And if a biologist showed up, I would accuse him of not being a geologist and not knowing what a fossil looks like.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 08:55 am
@rosborne979,
He keeps avoiding the issue that I rose. "Can you please show us from the SCIENTIFIC literature, where a fossil of an organism is included within an igneous rock?
Outside of that rhino CAST that I spoke of, I have no information that such fossils even exist. Even if they did, what bewildered is showing us are beautiful examples of cryatals in the actual mix of igneous rocks.
The logic of implacement seems to escape him .
Its obvious he wants stuff like this to enhance his status among his asian peers. I dont think we are the ultimate "customers" of his ****
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 09:12 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Its obvious he wants stuff like this to enhance his status among his asian peers. I dont think we are the ultimate "customers" of his ****
I don't know what his game is. Assuming he's not just plain nuts.
0 Replies
 
bewildered
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 09:45 am
@farmerman,
Coward, read my words again:
"Remember to provide a micrograph to substantiate your claim for minerals"
If you think the black-star-shaped particles are pyroxene or any other mineral, then show me a micrograph of that mineral evidencing the same morphology of the black-star shaped particles. I have seen many micrographs showing pyroxene. Those micrographs do contain particles with star shapes. However, the star-shaped particles in the pyroxene micrograph are not a part of pyroxene.
That is the problem, because a mineral must have a definitive chemical formula, repetitive structure (with crystals repeating themselves continuously unless stopped by other minerals). Those black star shaped particles simply do NOT repeat themselves, period. No mineral crystals develop the shape and size of neurons. If you find such a mineral, you will revolutionize geology, because the "new mineral" have short dendrite and long axon and connected to each other for communication. Look at one neuron from google.
0 Replies
 
bewildered
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 09:53 am
@rosborne979,
It never occurred to any student that he/she can apply his/her biology knowledge to micrographs of rocks. That is the source of all problems in geology.
bewildered
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 09:56 am
@farmerman,
"Trust me, its nothing alien, it merely a series of rocks with the crystal components therein."
I cannot trust anyone who cannot give a link to a micrograph of pyroxene mineral to substantiate his claim when there are numerous micrograph of pyroxene in Google images.
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 10:08 am
@bewildered,
bewildered wrote:
It never occurred to any student that he/she can apply his/her biology knowledge to micrographs of rocks. That is the source of all problems in geology.
And it never occurred to any student that he/she can apply his/her geology knowledge to cloud formations. That is the source of all problems in meteorology.
High Seas
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 10:57 am
@rosborne979,
Fluid dynamics equations work with air, water, and gooey stuff like magma in volcanoes, so I'm not sure that analogy is correct. But as to Martian brains falling in Morocco or anywhere else..... Smile
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 11:25 am
@bewildered,
Your own thin sections are examples of pyroxenes you idiot. Dont beg the real issue that you have no idea of what you speak.
(Unless youre some doofus wiseass from Sandia labs whose tryin to pull my chain). I will get you for that D. G. if this is you.
Youve just given me a clue that this is a total joke and Ive been suckered in like getting all excited at some POS that gungasnake posts.
OhH Man youre =gonna get it .
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 01:27 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

Fluid dynamics equations work with air, water, and gooey stuff like magma in volcanoes, so I'm not sure that analogy is correct. But as to Martian brains falling in Morocco or anywhere else..... Smile
I was referring to the fact that you can see anything in a cloud if you work your imagination hard enough. That's all Bewildered is doing is imagining things that he recognizes. Micrographs are just ink blots to him, he sees what he wants to see. And for some really strange reason, what fills his every thought is neurons and blood vessels and blood cells and even epididymis's.
0 Replies
 
bewildered
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 07:57 pm
@farmerman,
Scientific: fossil bones found in igneous rocks in Tinguiririca fauna. Just search for Tinguiririca Fauna in Google.
Here is a news report:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_n15_v144/ai_14488702/

Big mouth, do you know something called "control"? That is for comparison with mineral you claim for. Big mouth is never responsible. He never gives a link to a micrograph to substantiate his bluff. That link is needed for COMPARISON WITH HIS CLAIM/BLUFF.
bewildered
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 08:14 pm
@farmerman,
"Your own thin sections are examples of pyroxenes you idiot."
1. That is not my own thin section.
2. That is a micrograph in Wikipedia article on basalt.
3. Your own words above: "example of pyroxenes" can be changed into "example of olivine, zircon, in fact any mineral" by any person.
4. Do not talk to me again without evidencing/substantiating your claim/identification by presenting a micrograph of pyroxene such as this one:
http://www-odp.tamu.edu/publications/174A_SR/chap_07/c7_af17.htm

Repeat: there are numerous micrographs on the internet showing pyroxene. You just need to choose one that match the black star shaped particles with same size and shape (including the dendrite and axons)
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 08:46 pm
@bewildered,
bewildered wrote:

Scientific: fossil bones found in igneous rocks in Tinguiririca fauna. Just search for Tinguiririca Fauna in Google.
Here is a news report:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_n15_v144/ai_14488702/
The article doesn't say igneous rock. Its talking about sedimentary layers containing the fossils. So it's talking about sedimentary rock, not igneous.
bewildered
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 Jan, 2012 10:29 pm
@bewildered,
The black star-shaped particles are marked in this figure Edit [Moderator]: Link removed
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jan, 2012 05:25 am
@bewildered,
They're just black star-shaped particles. They're not neurons.
0 Replies
 
bewildered
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jan, 2012 05:25 am
@rosborne979,
Non-detection does not mean non-existence. Am I the first to find neuron remains in basalt, moon rocks, Mars rocks, meteorites?
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Jan, 2012 05:31 am
@bewildered,
First of all, you haven't found anything. You're just claiming that a speck that looks like a neuron "is" a neuron. And yes, as far as I know, you're the only one saying this.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jan, 2012 06:22 am
@bewildered,
Quote:
Non-detection does not mean non-existence.
Actually, yes it does. Its a fairy tale till its detected. By setting up conditions that are totally alien to fossilization, youre gonna be working for the rest of your life and wont find anything that is real.
You are the only one doing this and, if youre not DG at a Nat Lab screwing around, then youre wating an educational experience with junk science
0 Replies
 
 

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