43
   

I just don’t understand drinking and driving

 
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 05:17 pm
@MMarciano,
MMarciano wrote:

Thom isn't getting out of this, he will do time. Question is how much.


No one has disagreed with that statement, the current discussion revolves around the question of whether the time he does in jail is likely to represent a just penalty for what he did. He is up for 6-30 years, my guess is that he will end up at 13 years.

What did Thom do for work? Any chance he can do it 13 years from now as a felon?
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 05:26 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
What did Thom do for work? Any chance he can do it 13 years from now as a felon?

I suspect that's the least of Thom's worries right now.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 05:30 pm
@firefly,
firefly wrote:

Quote:
What did Thom do for work? Any chance he can do it 13 years from now as a felon?

I suspect that's the least of Thom's worries right now.


Prob not, but there is a realestate company registered at his home address, might be old or it might be a BF, or maybe his career is over no matter how sweet a deal he gets....I am not clear on where Florida is on professional licenses for felons.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 07:03 pm
Lindsay, I've been thinking about getting some life insurance. You wouldn't, by chance, know anyone who could help, would you?
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  9  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 07:27 pm
This whole incident was a wake up call for quite a few. A lot of friends I know didn’t go out for New Years Eve. Most stayed home or took a taxi or walked.

Thom killed another human being and has to live with that for the rest of his life, in prison or not!

My friend Jonathan has known him for over ten years and said Thom is severely depressed over this and not just because he is facing prison but also because he took someone’s life and I can understand that.

The only good to come of this is the wake up call to so many who think they can have a few cocktails and drive home.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 08:11 pm
@jcboy,
Quote:
Thom killed another human being and has to live with that for the rest of his life, in prison or not!


Wait, you found someone who thinks that he might not go to prison?

Quote:
The only good to come of this is the wake up call to so many who think they can have a few cocktails and drive home


Actually, most guys can do exactly that...a person of 180 pounds can have three drinks and be fine, which is a "few cocktails".

I understand that this is an emotional event for you, but let's please try to stay factually correct MKay?
MMarciano
 
  3  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 08:29 pm
@hawkeye10,
Factually correct?

He drove home drunk and killed someone in the process.

I sure wouldn't want to live with that for the rest of my life.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 08:36 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
the 5 amendment is a shield.
firefly wrote:
Only against self-incrimination--meaning you have something to hide.
OR that u don't trust government to tinker with information
that u give it and u 'd rather not take chances

SELF-INCRIMINATION:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8z7NC5sgik

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08fZQWjDVKE







David
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 08:38 pm
@MMarciano,
Quote:
I sure wouldn't want to live with that for the rest of my life.


Nobody would, and we knew that because Thom is the kind of guy who would report himself when he had a chance of maybe avoiding the law that he is the kind of guy who would take this hard. But the "factually correct" comment was about the false claim that we can not have a few cocktails and drive home.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 08:42 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Thom killed another human being and has to live with that for the rest of his life, in prison or not!
hawkeye10 wrote:
Wait, you found someone who thinks that he might not go to prison?
ME. I think its an open question.
The results of litigation r never predictable, including criminal litigation.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 08:50 pm
@MMarciano,
MMarciano wrote:
Factually correct?

He drove home drunk and killed someone in the process.

I sure wouldn't want to live with that for the rest of my life.
The question is whether government
will make it more severe and less tolerable
than the burden on Thom 's conscience.

( Do we pronounce that like "Tom" or like Thread?? )
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 09:06 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
What did Thom do for work? Any chance he can do it 13 years from now as a felon?
firefly wrote:
I suspect that's the least of Thom's worries right now.
hawkeye10 wrote:
Prob not, but there is a realestate company registered at his home address, might be old or it might be a BF, or maybe his career is over no matter how sweet a deal he gets....I am not clear on where Florida is on professional licenses for felons.
He shoud be OK,
if he is only a high school graduate, or a drop out,
but if he ever made anything of himself, dentist, medical doctor,
surgeon, podiatrist, lawyer, engineer, psychologist, real estate broker,
electrician. . . whatever the Florida laws decree, then conviction of a felony
might end his career and demote him to street bum or shoe salesman.
Among the professionals that I know, a loss of professional licensure
woud be considered much more severe than prison.





David
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 09:09 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
Among the professionals that I know, a loss of professional licensure
woud be considered much more severe than prison.


A point that we all missed in the 1st class pedophile thread, so that guy now not only can not teach but he can not do his engineering work after he does his time either if they do this in Utah.
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 09:32 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
Actually, most guys can do exactly that...a person of 180 pounds can have three drinks and be fine, which is a "few cocktails".

Most guys have have three drinks and not be over the legal limit... it does not mean that three cocktails does not affect their driving ability.

IMO, the legal limit is a level at which society says, "WTF is wrong with you? GTF off the road."
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 09:34 pm
@firefly,
DAVID wrote:
Arguably, defendant lived at the scene of the ax
and he used available equipment (his fone at home) to summon help.
firefly wrote:
Oh, please, David, the defendant didn't live at the scene of the accident.
The accident happened on a public street.
Well, if there r houses there, fronting on the road,
then their inhabitants live at the scene of ax.
It is an ez argument that their nabors also live at the scene.

It will be a matter of judicial interpretation; as I see it,
the result can go either way.



firefly wrote:
You're being absurd.
We 'll see what happens.
When u were in law school,
did u see many judicial opinions
that u deemed to be absurd??
I did; some of them were overturned.




firefly wrote:
The law required him to immediately pull over and stop his car after hitting the cyclist.
He didn't do that.
Maybe he hit the brake; (a lot of drivers 'd do that reflexively),
subsequent to which he went to use his home fone, as fast as possible,
to summon assistance in a fervent effort to save bicyclist's life.
He then possibly ingested alcohol, to steady his nerves, after an alarming event.





firefly wrote:
He hit the man and kept on driving.
He's in a great deal of trouble for leaving the scene of an accident/crime.
It looks like he 's in trouble, but a decent defense attorney
will probably find that he has some opportunities to bring this
to a satisfactory conclusion. Thom needs an experienced guy with some talent.
I 've seen some hopeless cases; this is not among them.





David
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 09:40 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
He then possibly ingested alcohol, to steady his nerves, after an alarming event.


The quintessential US movie move.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 10:20 pm
@DrewDad,
.08 is too low of a limit in my mind the older 1.0 make more sense but we do not make law by common sense in the US but by emotions.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 10:28 pm
@hawkeye10,
I had this amusing if sad picture of some poor guy bleeding out under Firefly car front wheels begging her to go get him help.

Sorry but I can not walk away and find a working phone as the law state clearly that I must stay here at the scene of my running over your soon to be dead body.

I really must remember to keep the old cell phone charge in the future.

OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2012 11:51 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
I had this amusing if sad picture of some poor guy bleeding out under Firefly car front wheels begging her to go get him help.

Sorry but I can not walk away and find a working phone as the law state clearly that I must stay here at the scene of my running over your soon to be dead body.

I really must remember to keep the old cell phone charge in the future.
I thawt u put that well.
Sometimes u come up with some good arguments
(but remember: if u decide to become a lawyer,
u 'll need to clean up your language).

The death penalty applies (to the victim)
for tortfeasor's compliance with the law.





David
0 Replies
 
stpetefriend22
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Jan, 2012 12:13 am
@MMarciano,
You obviously don't know Thom. This not accurate information.
0 Replies
 
 

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