21
   

The United Kingdom's bye bye to Europe

 
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 03:18 am
@saab,
“We have a regulation … where every EU country has the right to notify one official language,” Hübner said. “The Irish have notified Gaelic, and the Maltese have notified Maltese, so you have only the U.K. notifying English.”

“If we don’t have the U.K., we don’t have English,” Hübner said.

http://www.politico.eu/article/english-will-not-be-an-official-eu-language-after-brexit-senior-mep/
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 03:23 am
@saab,
Whatever you said ...
Quote:
http://i63.tinypic.com/2hfmnhg.jpg

... there are 28 member countries of the EU (and English has been chosen by the UK )
There is no official demand that the UK wants to cancell the membership.
And even afterwards, the UK still is a member country ... for two years.

Junker is the president of the Commission. The Council of the European Union decides with unanimous vote about the official languages.
lmur
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 03:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Assuming there will have to be some sort of vote to remove English, I imagine Ireland will vote to keep it on the basis that most of our members cannot speak Irish Gaelic fluently.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 03:59 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
There is no official demand that the UK wants to cancell the membership.
And even afterwards, the UK still is a member country ... for two years.

Exactly, so the good Juncker should please behave accordingly.
Junker is the president of the Commission and he is the one who made the taxlaws in Luxemburg and got lots of firms from other EU countries to have offices there. This meant that other EU countries lost taxmoney. The whistleblowers get punished - Juncker is still president.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 05:11 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
Exactly, so the good Juncker should please behave accordingly.
Junker is the president of the Commission and he is the one who made the taxlaws in Luxemburg and got lots of firms from other EU countries to have offices there. This meant that other EU countries lost taxmoney. The whistleblowers get punished - Juncker is still president.
I thought your response was about the official languages in the EU, that there are only 27 member countries now and that English isn't an official language anymore in the EU.

Well, Junkers should have behaved. And the EU-parliament should have been disciplined because they MEP's (besides those on the extreme right) applauded to his comments.

However, Luxembourg is a democratic country - no minister makes laws there.
That whistleblowers get punished in Luxembourg has to due with Luxembourg's criminal code and the ruling of the courts there.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 05:28 am
@lmur,
lmur wrote:
Assuming there will have to be some sort of vote to remove English, I imagine Ireland will vote to keep it on the basis that most of our members cannot speak Irish Gaelic fluently.
Both Ireland aas well as Malta chose "their" languages as official languages - because the UK had chosen English.
It seems more than impossible that one of these countries or both agree with 25 other countries to remove English as official language.
But eevn if all 27 countries would agree to remove English - they still needed the English translation department - not only for official, protocol reasons but to translate rules, laws, press reports etc.

(As an aside: the language department of the German Foreign Office has several hundred employees, all with a master degree.)
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 05:52 am
Jean-Claude Juncker
Juncker was Prime Minister of Luxembourg from 1995 to 2013, as well as Minister for Finances from 1989 to 2009.
For 14 years he was both Prime Minister and Minister of Finances.
Is that a good combination?
I do not think I am the only one who has doubts about his behavior and being president of EU.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/eu-commission-president-juncker-under-fire-a-1098232.html
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 06:00 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
For 14 years he was both Prime Minister and Minister of Finances.
Is that a good combination?
I have no idea if Luxembourg law allows such (I would think so).
Or are you suggesting that the elections there were corrupt?

Since you're so interested in Luxembourg and Junker - why don't you start an own thread about it?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 06:05 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
I do not think I am the only one who has doubts about his behavior and being president of EU.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/eu-commission-president-juncker-under-fire-a-1098232.html
From what details in that article did you get that there are doubts about him being president?

With 422 votes in favour, the European Parliament elected Jean-Claude Juncker in a secret ballot on 15 July 2014 as President of the new European Commission. (The minimum number of votes required was 376.)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 06:56 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
This meant that other EU countries lost taxmoney.
Those tax havens really are a big problem in the EU - see: =http://www.investopedia.com/articles/wealth-management/121515/top-10-european-tax-havens.asp][b]The Top 10 European Tax Havens[/b]
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 07:04 am
Back to the topic.

This 'bye bye' to Europe isn't the main between those who started it, it seems: 'Boris was blown up by a political psychopath but it was Mrs Gove who detonated the bomb'
Quote:
[...] Michael Gove knifed Boris Johnson in the back and in the front, pushed him under a bus, ran over him several times (thank you Piers Morgan for this image) and then declared he was running for the leadership himself. ... ... ...

Brexit means Brexit. At some point Article 50 will be invoked. And never again listen to what a politician says. Watch what he or she does.

Gove was well known to be an ideological ninja, with his posters of Che Guevara and Chairman Mao on his wall, but when it came to the top job he was an avowed cleanskin.

He had no leadership ambitions. After all, he’d said so many times: ‘If anyone wants me to sign a piece of parchment in my own blood saying I don’t want to be PM I’m happy to do that.’

‘I’m not equipped to be PM. I don’t want to be PM.’

‘I am an inconceivable choice. I don’t want to do it. I wouldn’t do it. It wouldn’t matter how many people asked me to do it,’ etc, etc…

And then, on Thursday, he executed the most egregious reverse ferret and act of treachery in modern political history since… well, let’s just say since Michael Gove backed Brexit against the wishes of his good friend David Cameron.[...]


But Gove sais patriotism and principles led him to turn on Boris Johnson and David Cameron
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 12:47 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I don't know much anout Michael Gove, but what I have seen so far leaves a very poor impression. The UK can do better.
0 Replies
 
Agent1741
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 May, 2018 11:19 pm
Having spent much of my life in England realistically for the average Joe I do not think it benefitted them so much. It costs England huge amounts of money to be in it & when you can buy a car that's built in England & go to Germany buy it & bring it back (to England) pay tax etc & its still cheaper that just buying it in England to start with that's bad!!! Personally I also think its bad for them to be governed by Brussels. Trying to abolish the pound note would also be political suicide! The only benefit (as I see it) was being able to travel simply between EU countries .
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2019 04:26 pm
@Agent1741,
Quote:
Trying to abolish the pound note would also be political suicide!
I'm not sure about the political suicide, but it would be economic suicide. It can also be political suicide after consumers learn the higher cost to live.
https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/articles/ideas-work/euro-killing-europe

Quote:
The Euro placed responsibility for monetary policy for the entire continent in the hands of the Frankfurt-based European Central Bank (ECB), stripping individual members of the ability to lower interest rates or devalue currency to spur the economy during an economic trough. With member states’ hands tied monetarily, the European Union further failed to provide structures for a fiscal response to a continental crisis. When, for instance, the Spanish economy failed, there was no built-in mechanism to provide stimulus or a bailout, no requirement that other Euro members to come to its aid, and no continent-wide social safety net, like unemployment insurance, to cushion the blow. With no procedures in place to leave the Euro, the system ensured that any economic hiccup would become a full-scale political crisis.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

THE BRITISH THREAD II - Discussion by jespah
FOLLOWING THE EUROPEAN UNION - Discussion by Mapleleaf
Amanda Knox - Discussion by ossobuco
Sinti and Roma: History repeating - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
[B]THE RED ROSE COUNTY[/B] - Discussion by Mathos
Leaving today for Europe - Discussion by cicerone imposter
So you think you know Europe? - Discussion by nimh
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/26/2019 at 10:26:58