21
   

The United Kingdom's bye bye to Europe

 
 
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Tue 28 Jun, 2016 05:19 pm
@saab,
I suspect the reasons may include;
=> Concerns among the Major EU nations that the contaigon may spread. This may induce them to demonstrate that nations leaving the union may have a bad time of it.
=> By virtue of its economic power and self-interest in preserving the Eurozone, Germany has a particularly strong voice in EU governance and and equally strong vested self interst in preserving it.
=> Both Italy and France have minority political movements that are restive with respect to the ever growing reach of the EU bureaucracy in Brussels. I suspect Merkel is particularly anxious to keep them close right now.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 28 Jun, 2016 10:39 pm
@georgeob1,
Certainly you are correct here.
And perhaps additionally there's another one: we got used to the EU.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 07:24 am
I found this on facebook, so, it has to be true.
https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-0/s480x480/13557846_10209003105468833_1256608662356284242_n.jpg?oh=39fc7e75fa05e308bc13979ea7091425&oe=580A723A
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 07:32 am
@edgarblythe,
Generally, and not just in the UK but in any EU-member state: if something doesn't work out well or isn't liked by the population: it's always the EU Very Happy
georgeob1
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:40 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I suspect the EU functionaries blame the national governments with about the same frequency as to the national governments blame them.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:45 am
@georgeob1,
Rarely.
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 12:18 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I am very skeptical of that.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 12:19 pm
@georgeob1,
Perhaps it isn't published a lot here, when one of the other countries is blamed.(Since the "EU functionaries" (which are the Commissioners, I suppose) are from each country, that really might be so.)
georgeob1
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 06:11 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Bureaucracies are more or less the same all over the world. The less they are held to account in a democratic process the more self-serving they tend to become. To whom are the bureaucrats of the EU accountable? My admittedly distant impression is that the EU bureaucracy is large, very well-paid, and not very accountabe to anyone.

Based on what I read here and in the press, this perception was indeed a factor in the UK vote.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 10:47 pm
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:
To whom are the bureaucrats of the EU accountable? My admittedly distant impression is that the EU bureaucracy is large, very well-paid, and not very accountabe to anyone.

Based on what I read here and in the press, this perception was indeed a factor in the UK vote.
It has always been criticsed that the EU-civil servants and employees get better paid than identical positions in their home-countries - that's why many change the employer.
The wikipedia entry European Civil Service has some answers.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 10:54 pm
What will happen to the English language now?
Anybody can speak what they wants to, but will it disappear as one of the official languages in EU?
The Irish choose Irish as their official language and Malta Maltesian and not English.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:08 pm
@saab,
I am quite sure that at any time everybody can speak the language they want to speak.
The official language are regulated in the "Regulation No 1 determining the languages to be used by the European Economic Community of 1958" .

"Consolidated version of Regulation No 1 determining the languages to be used by the European Economic Community" (PDF)

Official langages in the EU
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:16 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I know that there are 24 officeal languages in EU and I know that they are regulated by laws and orders and whatever. What will happen to the official language when the country which has choosen a certain language leaves?
Does the language remain as one of the offical languages or not?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:39 pm
@saab,
saab wrote:
Does the language remain as one of the offical languages or not?
I'm no fortune-teller.
And I think that those who will decide such in a period after the two years when the UK might have left the EU, don't know it momentarily either.
Certainly it will remain a working language and co-official language.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2016 05:09 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The New York Times has today a very good article, which explains a lot for those not so familiar with the EU:

The E.U. Is Democratic. It Just Doesn’t Feel That Way.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Jul, 2016 09:14 pm
@saab,
Quote:
Recent reports from around the world are increasingly showing that English is spreading as the language of business success. Spoken by 1.75 billion people worldwide, English is now spoken by 1 in 4 people globally. See the below links to various news stories in which English is cited as a language of global commerce.May 4, 2012
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 01:44 am
@cicerone imposter,
The question is not about English world wide - only in Brussels in the EU.
There are 24 official languages representing the 28 countries - now 27. English was for England, but not for Ireland nor Malta. So the question was if EU now need papers translated into English if there is no official English language in EU?
The delegates often speak English together or make speaches in English, but the English spoken within EU has a range from being really bad to being very good spoken English.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 02:37 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
There are 24 official languages representing the 28 countries - now 27. English was for England, but not for Ireland nor Malta. So the question was if EU now need papers translated into English if there is no official English language in EU?
You repeat that quite often without giving a source, neglecting the rules about the EU-officially languages and what has been officially said (= references to the rules) to those who said this wrong idea like you still do.

Ireland and Malta didn't choose English as [their] official language, because it was already one.
Do you really think that these two countries would agree to kick English out of the list of of official languages? (And I have serious doubts, any other country would do it - it only could be done if all would agree. This hasn't happened - but you say that there only 27 official language now.)
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 03:03 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The languages of the European Union are languages used by people within the member states of the European Union (EU). They include the twenty-four official languages of the EU along with a range of others. The EU asserts that it is in favour of linguistic diversity. This principle is enshrined in the EU Charter (art. 22) and in the Treaty on European Union (art. 3(3) TEU).

In the European Union, language policy is the responsibility of member states and EU does not have a common language policy; European Union institutions play a supporting role in this field, based on the principle of "subsidiarity", they promote a European dimension in the member states' language policies. The EU encourages all its citizens to be multilingual; specifically, it encourages them to be able to speak two languages in addition to their native language.[4] Though the EU has very limited influence in this area as the content of educational systems is the responsibility of individual member states, a number of EU funding programmes actively promote language learning and linguistic diversity.[5]

The most widely spoken language in the EU is English, which is understood by 51% of all adults, while German is the most widely used mother tongue, spoken by 18%. All 24 official languages of the EU are accepted as working languages, but in practice only two – English and French – are in wide general use and of these English is the more commonly used. French is an official language in all three of the cities that are political centres of the Union: Brussels (Belgium), Strasbourg (France) and Luxembourg City (Luxembourg).
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2016 03:05 am
@saab,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_European_Union

I said 24 languages representing 28 countries now 27.
Jean-Claude Juncker is the one who behaves as if there are 27 countries in EU now. He even screamed at one of the British representatives to get out as he had nothing to do in EU any more. It is the official attitude of Juncker to behave as real anti British person.

 

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