Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 04:33 pm
How long does it take to create a nutrino and when does the speed of light apply during the process?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,899 • Replies: 12
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 04:40 pm
@Bracewell,
Are you asking how it happens inside a star?
Bracewell
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 05:12 pm
@rosborne979,
Perhaps but more particularly at Cern before it goes on holiday to Italy.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 06:05 pm
@Bracewell,
If you're wondering what caused the neutrino mystery with regard to special relativity, that's been solved already. There are a couple of other threads on it.

Or did you have something else in mind with your question?

Bracewell
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 12:04 pm
@rosborne979,
No, but it would be helpful if you gave the thread reference.
igm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 01:06 pm
@Bracewell,
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b016bys2/Faster_Than_the_Speed_of_Light/
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 01:15 pm
@Bracewell,
Bracewell wrote:

No, but it would be helpful if you gave the thread reference.

Here, I found it...

http://able2know.org/topic/177781-1

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Bracewell
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 05:40 pm
OK. my mistake, I had no idea that the forum had already chewed this subject. However, I didn't see any difinitive conclusion so I can't agree that the subject is closed.
I had an idea that what might be involved is two speeds. The first speed being an inflationary-like speed before the nutrino is fully formed and then followed by a more sedate sub-light speed.
As I understand it only mass is forbidden to exceed light speed and therefore before a particle is formed it might have no mass at all and may be able to travel much faster than light as nothing more than field information (say).
It might be interesting to see how results change with the detector at various distances starting from perhaps a few metres.



rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Oct, 2011 12:45 pm
@Bracewell,
Bracewell wrote:
OK. my mistake, I had no idea that the forum had already chewed this subject. However, I didn't see any difinitive conclusion so I can't agree that the subject is closed.
If I remember correctly, one of the news articles reported that the group who did the initial testing failed to take Special Relativity into account for the time intervals on the GPS satellites they were using. Once the SR offsets were applied, the numbers for neutrino speed came right into line.
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Bracewell
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Oct, 2011 02:41 pm
The New Scientist must be out of date at this weeks issue (21st Oct 11) because it states the puzzle still exists.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Oct, 2011 03:01 pm
@Bracewell,
The problem seems to be that there are many possible solutions and none have them have been completely proven, yet.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Oct, 2011 06:42 pm
@Bracewell,
Bracewell wrote:

The New Scientist must be out of date at this weeks issue (21st Oct 11) because it states the puzzle still exists.

Can you provide a link to the article, or is it subscription only?
0 Replies
 
Bracewell
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Oct, 2011 05:03 pm
I tried but I cannot crack The New Scientist site and give you a reference ( I am pretty hopeless at such things). However, the article is there under Maths and Physics articles.
0 Replies
 
 

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