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Aeroengines ( gas turbine) question?

 
 
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 07:50 am
Hello, guys!

I have a question about the aeroengines, because i am highly interested in them and want to study them in depth at university. In brief, my question is, whether i have to study Aerospace/Aeronautical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering at university in order to know more things about airplane engines and logically to work with them when i graduate.

This question really disturbs me....after all it affects my career and studies.

Thank you for your co-operation in advance! Wink
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 2,231 • Replies: 9
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jespah
 
  2  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 08:05 am
@Luftwaffe,
Looks like aerospace does contain some engine design, at least in the MIT curriculum: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/aeronautics-and-astronautics/ (you might want to check a few others)
Mechanical engineering contains, among other things, their robotics classes: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mechanical-engineering/

I would suggest looking at several schools, even if you think you don't want to go to some of them/can't get into them, and try to get a consensus. I happen to know that, for example, robotics engineering is all over the place (other schools put it into the EE curriculum, for example), so the same may be true for aircraft design and the like.

Best of luck with your studies.
Luftwaffe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 08:32 am
@jespah,
Ok, thank you very much man! I will bear in mind what you have told me. Perhaps it depends on the university programme a person chooses, so I will check several more and will make my decision.

Everything best!
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 08:39 am
@Luftwaffe,
I'm a woman, actually. Wink
Luftwaffe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 12:27 pm
@jespah,
Yeah, i have noticed! Beg your pardon Smile!
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 12:37 pm
@Luftwaffe,
Very likely a bright future in small aircraft for that Angel Labs engine:

www.angellabsllc.com
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 01:23 pm
@Luftwaffe,
No worries. And welcome to A2k! Smile
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georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 01:38 pm
@Luftwaffe,
Aerospace Engineering or aeronautical engineering as it was once called is usually a vaguely defined umbrella embracing fluid mechanics, gas dynamics, materials science and elasticity, and some aspects of electrical engineering and mechanical engineering. In short all of the principal scientific & engineering disciplines applied in the design of aircraft and their propulsion systems. Folks who go on past an undergraduate degree usually end up specializing in one of these aspects of the discipline.

If you do an undergratuate degree in mechanical engineering, you will likely have little trouble going on to a graduate program in a related discipline in an Aerospace greaduate program if that is your desire.
Luftwaffe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 06:25 am
@georgeob1,
Ok, i got it. Probably, i will choose Aerospace Engineering and after my BEng will start MEng/MSc in Engines/Propulsion( if i find such a programme or similar at any university). Moreover, as georgeob1 says i am quite sure that there should be an opportunity to specialize in on of the aspects of Aerospace at the end of my degree course.

Thanks again!
georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 07:20 am
@Luftwaffe,
I majored in mechanical engineering as an undergraduate; got into aviation as a Naval aviator; later went to test pilot school, and then back to graduate school for an MS in Aeronautical engineering and ended up doing a PhD at Caltech in Fluid mechanics. It's a big tent and you can move around in it as your evolving interests lead you.

Good luck !
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