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Should we do what we want?

 
 
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2011 01:38 pm
Consider the following argument.

If you don't have what you want, you either will continue to want it forever, will stop wanting it, or will get it.

The first possibility is bothersome. You would be committing yourself to a life full of false dreams and hopes. Your life would be full of suffering.

The second possibility may not even happen. You have no way of knowing the future, and so you don't know if you will ever stop wanting what you desire. Simply waiting until you stop wanting it therefore is pointless because we don't know if you ever will stop wanting it.

Therefore by process of elimination, the best course of action seems to be to go get what you want.

You should therefore do what you want, all the time.

What do you think of this argument? Is this right? If not, what is wrong with the above reasoning?
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thack45
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2011 02:22 pm
@browser32,
If you don't have what you want, you will either decide to continue to want it, or decide to stop wanting it by deciding whether or not to get it. Either you stop wanting it or you don't.
Everything else is decisions which would be based on what it is that you want. Your logic doesn't take the possibility of negative consequence in to account.
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JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2011 02:29 pm
The best way to rid oneself of temptation is to give in to it.
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wayne
 
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Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2011 02:34 pm
This doesn't take into account that our wants are many, and often conflicting.
There is no way to avoid choices.
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blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Jun, 2011 08:41 am
If no one is harmed do as thou wilst. Go for it.
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G H
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Jun, 2011 12:35 pm
@browser32,
Quote:
Therefore by process of elimination, the best course of action seems to be to go get what you want.

It wouldn't be so much the best option as the actual first consideration or attempt to remedy a desire/need. One wouldn't be bothering to philosophize away such desire/need to begin with, if it could be satisfied. "You can't judge a book by its cover" wasn't sap invented for people who had access to being rid of a bad or misleading appearance.
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Jun, 2011 10:28 pm
@G H,
Moreover, you shouldn't judge a cover by its book.
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