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I'm trying to understand people who don't read for pleasure.

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 05:10 pm
@ossobuco,
One more post - I think my impetus for reading was to find out about the world (only child who moved a lot). Log time later, it still is.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 05:27 pm
So is the other 40% lies, or damn lies, Set?

It seems to me that it is an individual experience took, David, and sometimes I wonder if that might be the problem with getting Mo to read. He gets very frustrated with me when I'm doing something that doesn't include him.

Hmmmm.......

The owning of books has come up a few times and that idea leaves me scratching my head most of all. Both Mr. B and Mo grew up surrounded by books (Mo missed a bit during the first two years of his life though). I've read to Mo constantly -- I STILL do. The other day when Mo said he was bored I suggested he pick out a book that he (or we) could read and his exact words were "Schools out. I don't have to read anymore." A few days later he did ask for a book about WW2 so ..... I don't know.

That also goes to dlowan's comment about it being something that someone can "do". It drives me crazy when Mo or Mr. B interrupt my reading because I'm not really "doing" anything.

Osso, I sometimes think that computers are a boon to readers more than anyone else.
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 05:36 pm
@boomerang,
Might also relate to the type of brain you have....though with our increasing understanding of neuroplasticity and all that may be a furphy.


I know that my strengths in IQ testing are strongest in the verbal area....but is that chicken or egg?

I just know that, once I could read, I took to it as a fish to water....both as a means of finding out as much as I could about life in the scientific sense and as an intense pleasure.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 06:29 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
Interesting - my playwright husband didn't read fiction past having to for classes.
Not that I'm arguing, we all differ on stuff; sometimes biases seriously stick.

..famous to me family scene when a cousin gave him a then popular fiction book for christmas and he was so duh.
What was it again,
that u wanted me to get u from that bookstore in Portland, Oregon
when I 'm there for the Annual Gathering ?





David
tsarstepan
 
  4  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 06:38 pm
@boomerang,
I think there is something of value in your theory Boomerang. But like any theory on sociability and the willingness for escapism in reading, there are always exceptions to the rules, hence ehBeth's shy coworker who doesn't read.

Clearly, I think its a factor for some people. Also, parenting can be an important factor. My father would push me into reading especially during the summertime when I was in elementary and middle school but never forced me to read certain books.

On the other hand, I despised being forced to read those dreadfully boring classics assigned during middle school and high school with rare exceptions like To Kill a Mockingbird and Animal Farm.

I believe that the more freedom a person has as a child to pick and choose his or her books according to taste, the better the chances he or she will become a lifelong reader.

On an aside, with the presence of the daily newspaper at my house and my father's house, I read the newspaper for enjoyment purposes as well. I started my lifelong habit of reading most newspapers and many magazines from the back page forward. With newspapers, the Boston Globe and the Middlesex News, the sports and comic pages were in the last section thusly were read first.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 06:41 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
I forget..
will look it up.
msolga
 
  3  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 06:43 pm
@sozobe,
Very interesting discussion, boomerang.

Quote:
I wonder if it's a role model thing at all? That's one part I'm not sure of, how much the parents read.

Neither of my parents were readers, in fact they'd had minimal (if any) formal education at all. The was no reading matter at all in our home.
We arrived in Australia when I was one year old, as migrants/refugees.
For the first few years of our life here, we all spoke Ukrainian at home, so I couldn't speak English when I started primary school.
The thing was, from the minute I learned to read, I couldn't stop! I would almost describe it as a compulsion. I read & read & read & read! I just loved it!
My sister, who is about 6 years older than me, has shown little or no interest in reading throughout her life.
Why were we so different? I honestly don't know, though she was a lot more extroverted than me & threw herself into the social life of the community while I read (also & wrote & and drew) heaps ... at school & at home. We have very different natures.
I think, to me reading was almost a life raft, it took me completely out of the world I was living in & into other entirely different worlds ... maybe it was a form escapism? Something which completely removed me from the sometimes melancholy & difficult life we were all living through at the time?





0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 06:48 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

She was brought up in a large, poor family in a regional town that is centered around a particular industry and where there is little culture of reading. There was no money for books, except school books, and no example of reading for its own sake.


That's interesting bunny. Growing up in my suburban town, our school books were free. Bookstores and public libraries were abundant. Allowance money was freely spent on books. I wonder in that family, books are associated (especially where school books aren't freely supplied) with being financial waste and burden.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 06:55 pm
@boomerang,
I can't remember about past threads but what is Mo's position on the realm of comic books and graphic novels? I know because of his age, you would limit the intake of these types of these books but I wonder if that might light his reading steam engine into a permanent full speed ahead regarding reading for pleasure.

Comic books did indeed help my burgeoning reading addiction.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 07:39 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
So is the other 40% lies, or damn lies, Set?

It seems to me that it is an individual experience took, David,
and sometimes I wonder if that might be the problem with
getting Mo to read. He gets very frustrated with me
when I'm doing something that doesn't include him.

Hmmmm.......
WOW, boomer!
That 's quite an HONOR, better than any gold trophy that I can think of.
Its indicative of what he thinks of (and how he feels about) U!





boomerang wrote:
The owning of books has come up a few times and that idea leaves me scratching my head most of all.
Both Mr. B and Mo grew up surrounded by books (Mo missed a bit during the first two years of his life though).

I've read to Mo constantly -- I STILL do.
That is very motherly, in the BEST possible way.
In both his subconscious mind, and in his fully conscious mind,
Mo will know that n remember it for the rest of his life and be affected thereby.
It shows that u care. It is very much an UNDERstatement to say that Mo is superlucky to have U for a mother!
Your reading to him might cause Mo to do likewise with his children.

What reading material does he favor ?





boomerang wrote:
The other day when Mo said he was bored I suggested he pick out a book that he (or we) could read
and his exact words were "Schools out. I don't have to read anymore."
Maybe he was just EXULTING in his newfound freedom and in his respite from mental labor.



boomerang wrote:
A few days later he did ask for a book about WW2 so ..... I don't know.
He defaults to books for desired information; he knows.





David


0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 07:47 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
I can't remember about past threads but what is Mo's position on the realm of comic books and graphic novels? I know because of his age, you would limit the intake of these types of these books but I wonder if that might light his reading steam engine into a permanent full speed ahead regarding reading for pleasure.

Comic books did indeed help my burgeoning reading addiction.
I still have my comic book collection (for which I paid a nickel or a dime each)
from the 1940s n 50s. Last I checked, thay were worth hundred$ of $$ each now.
I took particular pride in my Superman Collection.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 07:52 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
I forget..
will look it up.
OK





David
Irishk
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 07:56 pm
The upside is that non-readers are ridiculously easy to beat at Trivial Pursuit. Anyone ever notice that? Twisted Evil
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 08:10 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:
Well I love reading too - but I know some people that get bored reading - at least that is what they tell me.
Is that related to WHAT thay r reading ?





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 08:12 pm
@CalamityJane,
CalamityJane wrote:
I don't understand it either, but I've met a few people who don't (mostly men though). My ex-husband read a lot for business, but he never touched a book for leisure - he had some ADD tendencies anyways.

My daughter, who is a people person and very extroverted, does love to read.
She reads some of my books and loves the discussion afterwards. I come from a family of readers and it was just natural for me to continue reading.
Book discussion groups can be fun.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 08:23 pm

I remember Mayor Fiorello La Guardia reading us the Sunday comics
on the radio in 1945, during a newspaper strike.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 08:24 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:
The upside is that non-readers are ridiculously easy to beat at Trivial Pursuit. Anyone ever notice that? Twisted Evil
No; I was too busy reading.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 08:29 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
You'd be a formidable opponent, David.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 10:45 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
I'm trying to understand people who don't read for pleasure.

I think it's a straightforward case of Sturgeon's Law: "Ninety percent of everything is crap." Why should human brains be any different?
laughoutlood
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Jun, 2011 01:26 am
@boomerang,
I'm trying to understand people who don't read for pleasure.

Yes, it's quite the mixed bag and hatful here.

But then I always enjoyed talking about me mostly.
 

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