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Sex predator due for release despite expert opinion that he will re-offend.

 
 
Builder
 
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 03:09 am
By Melinda Howells and Jason Rawlins

Updated Fri May 20, 2011 12:09pm AEST


Corrective Services Minister Neil Roberts says one of Queensland's most notorious sex offenders, Robert John Fardon, would face strict conditions if he was released from prison.

The Supreme Court yesterday agreed to release 62-year-old Fardon but Queensland Attorney-General Paul Lucas is appealing against the decision.

Mr Lucas said yesterday community safety was paramount.

Fardon has spent more than 30 years in jails for offences against children and women.

He was released under a sexual offender's supervision order but was returned to custody for alleged breaches.

Acting Justice Julie Dick granted Fardon's release under a new supervision order, despite expert evidence that because of Fardon's psychopathic personality and attitude towards authority, it is highly likely he will contravene the order.

Justice Dick had agreed to release Fardon with restrictions on his movements in public, but during a hearing yesterday morning, she made an order suspending Fardon's bid for freedom until May 27.

Fardon will remain in custody pending the outcome of the Attorney-General's appeal against the decision to release him.

It is likely the appeal will be heard next week.

Mr Roberts says dangerous sex offenders are often subject to more than 50 conditions on their release.

"There's regular random and ongoing surveillance, curfews, restrictions on movements - for instance [he] can't go near schools, parks, anywhere where children congregate," he said.

"[There is a] requirement to attend counselling sessions and other sessions, electronic monitoring and the list goes on."

Mr Roberts says locals are notified if a dangerous sex offender moves into their neighbourhood, but he does not support calls for an online register of convicted sex offenders.

"However Queensland Corrective Services will do targeted release of information, particularly if an offender is to be released into the community," he said.

"They will talk to neighbours, they will talk to relatives etc and those in the immediate vicinity."

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/05/20/3222165.htm


Unbelievable. This psychopathic parasite abducted a twelve year old girl from her front yard in daylight, after assaulting her elder sister with the butt of his rifle. He took the child to a hotel room, and brutally raped her.

After serving eight years of his sentence for that crime, he lasted less than twenty days before raping and sodomising another victim.

He has spent almost 30 years in Townsville and Brisbane jails for serious sex offences against children and women, and was the first prisoner to be detained indefinitely under the state's controversial Dangerous Prisoners (Sexual Offenders) Act introduced in 2003.

What really pisses me off about the possibility of his release back into the community is, there are no current photos of him available, and it is unlikely any will be released. Why release this scum to reoffend? The cost of monitoring this parasite while released would be many times the cost of incarceration. What could possibly be behind the decision to release him? He will re-offend.
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msolga
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 03:38 am
@Builder,
Quote:
Fardon has spent more than 30 years in jails for offences against children and women.

He was released under a sexual offender's supervision order but was returned to custody for alleged breaches.

Acting Justice Julie Dick granted Fardon's release under a new supervision order, despite expert evidence that because of Fardon's psychopathic personality and attitude towards authority, it is highly likely he will contravene the order.


I am truly at a loss as to how to respond to this situation, Builder.

Why is he being released now? Because he has seen out his required term of imprisonment?

What would be the alternative (if any) , do you think, to releasing him after a 30 year imprisonment?

What would you consider adequate protection for the community on his release?

I can't really see him having anything resembling a "normal" life, if his neighbours are aware of his identity. They would most likely be appalled & extremely angry that he has been released into their community.


Builder
 
  0  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 07:16 am
@msolga,
He is simply an animal, Msolga. An "acting" Justice deems him to be no risk?She says? Then places over forty provisos on his release, allowing him access to public parks, because she thinks it will help his rehabilitation into society. I can't understand why educated experts are asked for (and paid for) their expert opinions, and then magistrates and judges ignore those opinions.

Why then does the Attorney- General have to waste more time and money to overturn a "decision" because, let's face it, how could any Judge reach that conclusion with the evidence before them?

I am gobsmacked that our Westminster law system could become so convoluted and arse-about-face, that this clearly institutionalised animal could be considered for release.

He has shown no remorse, and there are no indications that he has reformed in the slightest.

So angry about this injustice to his living victims.

The provisos are listed in the later pages of the following link, Msolga.

http://archive.sclqld.org.au/qjudgment/2011/QSC11-128.pdf

I have a personal interest in this case. This animal should be caged for life. Not just because of what he has done, but for what he is going to do upon release.
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 07:46 am
@msolga,
Oh, and I missed a couple of your questions. He is being considered for release now, because his last conviction has been overturned. Seems he has a team of lawyers working for him, though how that could be possible after thirty years of incarceration is beyond my comprehension.

The alternative to releasing him would be to recognise the evidence of psychological experts, and understand that releasing him is a danger to society, and young children and vulnerable young women in particular. The obvious conclusion being, don't release him. Ever.

These two drawings are the only clear images available of him.

http://resources3.news.com.au/images/2006/12/05/va1237224474454/Court-frees-rapist-5323968.jpg

http://sgp1.paddington.ninemsn.com.au/sunday/images/cover/sexcriminals2.jpg
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 07:51 am
@Builder,
Phew.
That's quite a list of offenses, the first at 18 years of age. Quite a history.
The incredible thing to me is that he has spent so long in prison without (apparently) completing the sexual offender program & is described as "institutionalized" by his time in prison.
If he is released into the community he is going to keep Corrective Services very busy!
Frankly, I'm stumped.
What do you do with a person with such a violent criminal history when they've "done their time"?
Arella Mae
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:09 am
@Builder,
Builder wrote:

Oh, and I missed a couple of your questions. He is being considered for release now, because his last conviction has been overturned. Seems he has a team of lawyers working for him, though how that could be possible after thirty years of incarceration is beyond my comprehension.

The alternative to releasing him would be to recognise the evidence of psychological experts, and understand that releasing him is a danger to society, and young children and vulnerable young women in particular. The obvious conclusion being, don't release him. Ever.

These two drawings are the only clear images available of him.

http://resources3.news.com.au/images/2006/12/05/va1237224474454/Court-frees-rapist-5323968.jpg

http://sgp1.paddington.ninemsn.com.au/sunday/images/cover/sexcriminals2.jpg
Awful situation! In that bottom drawing especially, I think he looks like that guy that kidnapped Elizabeth Smart. I am assuming they don't have a registered sex offender's program?
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:18 am
@msolga,
What to do with them? Spend a small fortune each week watching them like hawks.

I'm kinda hoping that the plan within the plan is to watch him catch some flying hot lead. And I'm not a violent person at all, Msolga. I am humane, but we're not dealing with a human here.

I'm feeling for those he has attempted to destroy, and those yet to experience his madness.
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:22 am
@Arella Mae,
It's likely he's only been convicted for a small percentage of his crimes.

Does QLD have a register for sex offenders? The state was actually ostracised by the fed gov for it's harsh treatment of such offenders.

Fardon was the first to be detained indefinitely after his sentence was completed, under QLD's sex offender legislation at that time.

0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:29 am
@Builder,
Quote:
Spend a small fortune each week watching them like hawks.

Yes, that's certainly what it's sounding like.

I know you're not a violent person, Builder.
Not asking for any details at all, understand, but it sounds to me like you feel so strongly about this case because you personally know someone whose life has been severely affected by this man.
If so, I can understand your feelings about the strong possibility of him being set free into the community again.
eurocelticyankee
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:31 am
@Builder,
I'll tell you what it is builder, it's PC, (political correctness) gone mad and the social and
penal systems trying to abdicate their responsibilities.
We have the same here in Ireland and Europe, the policy of trying to release
these kind of criminals and people with serious mental problems and a history of violence in to community care.
It all looks great on paper but well i don't know what it's like in Australia, but
over here they promise you there will be follow through and that they will be monitored,
but the reality is here in Ireland and in a lot of countries the social
services are under funded and under staffed and cant possibly keep a tab on all these parolees.
Only a fortnight ago in Spain a lunatic that had many previous convictions for violence
beheaded an innocent British lady in a supermarket in the middle of the day.
There are many examples of similar incidents.
The funny thing is a lot of these people commit these awful crimes to actually get put back into care.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/6215183/Anger-over-the-mental-patient-who-was-set-free-to-kill-a-stranger.html

Throw away the key.
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:15 am
@msolga,
Fardon came from my home town, Msolga.

I've been made aware of this situation by a close friend.

What really pisses me off, is that if he does get released, he will get better treatment and psychological care, than any of his targets ever did.
Builder
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:20 am
@eurocelticyankee,
Quote:
The funny thing is a lot of these people commit these awful crimes to actually get put back into care.


It's clear that he isn't reformed. His expert psyche assessment team agree that he is likely to re-offend. What is going on here is PC, you say?

Then PC must stand for Practised Craziness.

Viva La Revolution.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:52 pm
@Builder,
Quote:
Fardon came from my home town

Oh I see, Builder.
It is no doubt be a terribly upsetting thing for his victims to hear that he might soon be back in the community.
Thank heavens it won't be to their community!
Quote:
What really pisses me off, is that if he does get released, he will get better treatment and psychological care, than any of his targets ever did.

Yes.
I wholeheartedly agree with you.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:41 pm
@Arella Mae,
Australia has a registered sex offender program but the rules are different from those generally pertaining in the US
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 May, 2011 11:26 am
@dlowan,
Yes Deb. Westminster law is such a convoluted classist mess that I wonder why it still stands, and why vermin such as Fardon even rate a mention.

His hearing has been put forward to Monday 30th May, giving breathing space, at least for this weekend, to those who dread the thought of him walking the streets.

Fingers crossed that justice will somehow prevail amidst the chaos and ego-driven upper echelon of our clearly decrepit "legal" system.

Has this same system been effective in its place of origin??

I don't think so. What say you?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 May, 2011 09:20 pm
@Builder,
Law re sex offenders is made in every system and is a damned difficult thing to deal with in all

I have a deep distrust of newspaper reporting in this area and would like an informed explanation of why he is being considered for release

One possibility is that he HAS to be released and that they are trying to have a bit more control over that release than they would have if he simply served his sentence and went his way without any supervision at all....

If the law does not allow incarceration forever for this man then frankly I think releasing him is a greater good than the government ignoring its laws and incarcerating him without authority

I understand the frustration because I am intimately aware that most sex offenders in australia get off scot free, becuause of the inherent difficulties of prosecuting a crime that, by definition, almost never has witnesses and, contrary to the stupid forensic shows currently infesting television, almost never leaves forensic evidence worth a damn

And I also know that the younger your targets if you are a sexual offender, the more chance you have of getting off

Without really knowing the circumstances of this case I don't have much to say, except that I dont think the westminster system has anything to do with it

Most states have, I think, a law allowing lengthy incarceration of people too dangerous to release? But it seems that an important conviction in this mans case was overturned?

I have no problem with lifelong humane imprisonment under the law for those whose record shows them to be truly dangerous and incorrigible....though it is a hell's brew trying to make such decisions, but i think governmental observance of the rule of law is essential, and I am not sure what the law allows in this situation

I am certainly not prepared to condemn the authorities without knowing what their options are

Perhaps Queensland needs to review its law on this area?




Builder
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 12:05 am
@dlowan,
Well said Deb. Without going into detail, Fardon was released on parole, with conditions, several of which he breached. He was convicted of raping and sodomising an intellectually disabled woman that he had know for a long time. But due to inconsistencies in the verbal evidence of the intellectually disabled woman, his conviction was overturned.

But, he did breach several of his release conditions in the one night, and continued to breach those conditions after the alleged rape, so he clearly has no respect for the law, and the possiblility of him re-offending is very high, according to expert assessment by Dept. of Corrections psychologists.

Here's something that just hit the news-stands this morning.


GPS tracking for sex fiends refused due to funding contraints by Bligh Government

* From: The Courier-Mail
* May 28, 2011 12:00AM


QUEENSLAND Corrective Services repeatedly has been knocked back for funding to introduce GPS tracking devices for the state's most dangerous sex offenders.

Premier Anna Bligh blamed a lack of money for not making improvements to the system for monitoring sex predators.

The Courier-Mail has learnt at least three submissions have been made to Treasury by Corrective Services for funding of the technology, which would give authorities real-time information about the location of sex predators.

However each time the State Government has rejected the requests.

Corrective Services is understood to be keen to fit the state's 72 dangerous sex offenders with GPS tracking devices after the successful introduction of the technology in NSW.

The Premier yesterday blamed budget constraints for sticking with out-of-date monitoring bracelets using radio frequencies despite the availability of superior satellite technology.

================================================

There seems to be plenty of money for speed cameras, et al, but keeping our children safe from sex predators seems to be on the bottom of the wish list for spending.

A sad reflection on the value system of our current crop of politicians.
Builder
 
  0  
Reply Tue 31 May, 2011 05:06 pm
@Builder,
FORMER police minister Tony McGrady is calling on the public to support tougher measures for pedophiles, as one of the worst inches closer to freedom.

The Courier-Mail has launched its petition to have those released in the community tracked by GPS.

Mr McGrady, who introduced the Dangerous Prisoners and Sexual Offenders legislation, which allows the government to appeal the release of those considered a "high risk" of reoffending, pledged his support for the campaign and said the community also had to send a strong message to the judiciary.

"It appears to me the judges or judiciary are not taking heed of that legislation and therefore I think campaigns like the one been orchestrated by The Courier-Mail is welcome," he said.

"People have got to make their voices heard."

Convicted pedophile Robert John Fardon was released under a strict supervision order in 2006, but returned to jail when charged with rape in 2008. Recent freedom granted in the Supreme Court is now with the Court of Appeal with a decision due at the end of the week.

"We're talking about young kids both male and female whose lives have been ruined by the actions of these people," Mr McGrady said.

Link here. Please sign the petition here if you care for the safety of children.
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Jun, 2011 04:01 am
@Builder,

Pedophile Robert Fardon to stay in jail for three more weeks

* Mark Oberhardt
* From: The Courier-Mail
* June 03, 2011 10:14AM



A JUDGE has ordered notorious rapist Robert John Fardon remain in jail for at least the next three weeks until court hearings to determine his future in the community are determined.


In the Court of Appeal today, Justice Richard Chesterman agreed to extend a stay on a order which would have immediately freed Fardon.
Read the full judgment here

A full Court of Appeal will now hear an application by the Attorney General, Paul Lucas, to keep Fardon behind bars on June 23.

It is highly unlikely that a judgment would be delivered on that day and it would probably be up to further month before a decision is made.

================================================

Another collective sigh of relief.
Builder
 
  0  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 04:09 am
@Builder,
Link here

Fardon in suspense over his release

* Mark Oberhardt
* From: The Courier-Mail
* June 04, 2011 12:00AM

NOTORIOUS rapist Robert John Fardon could remain in jail for two months before he finally knows whether he can return to the community.

In the Court of Appeal yesterday, Justice Richard Chesterman agreed to extend a stay on an order that would have immediately freed Fardon back into the community but under a supervision order.

His decision came after community outrage that Fardon, a serial offender with a shocking record of callous sex offences, might be released. Those who spoke out against his release included a woman he brutally raped.

A full Court of Appeal will now hear an application by the Attorney-General, Paul Lucas, to keep Fardon behind bars on June 23.

However it will likely be another month before a decision is made.

In his written reasons, Justice Chesterman said lawyers for Fardon had made some powerful arguments and if there were "no more" in the case he would have refused the application.

Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.

End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

"They indicate that the risk that the respondent might commit a serious sexual offence before the appeal can be heard is not unacceptably high," he wrote.

"But, in the end, I am persuaded that the order of the primary judge should not take effect until the determination of the appeal."

Justice Chesterman said since the matter could be heard on June 23 Fardon would only be detained for a brief period.

He also said the primary judgment did not deal with concerns a supervision order would effectively reduce the risk of him offending to "acceptable limits".

"For that reason there may not have been a proper assessment of whether the supervision order will adequately protect the community," he said.

In the past week the State Government has come under fire for not committing money to GPS tracking for dangerous pedophiles like Fardon despite its relatively low cost.

In the Supreme Court on May 20, Justice Julie Dick ordered Fardon be released under a 50-point supervision regime, but the order was stayed until yesterday to allow Mr Lucas to appeal.

Mr Lucas had applied to keep Fardon in jail indefinitely, alleging he had contravened a supervision order.

Dan O'Gorman, SC, for Fardon, argued the breaches were trivial and should not prevent Fardon's return to the community and that he should not lose his freedom for another three weeks.

In a separate case yesterday, a man who raped a female taxi driver at knife point and forced a prisoner to perform oral sex on him had his strict community supervision order rescinded.

Mr Lucas went to the Supreme Court seeking to cancel the supervised release order for Anthony James Donovan.

Justice David Boddice agreed and Donovan was returned to serving an indefinite sentence yesterday.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ah, so there is some justice left in this system of ours. Thankyou Attorney-General Lucas. Keep up the good work.

 

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