Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 07:23 pm
@talk72000,
Quote:
So it was greed that led Washington to join the war of Independence as a general.
He certainly was greedy . He was offered a wage for his services, but declined in favour of expenses only . Isnt that lovely ? Except that his expenses turned out to be many times more than what they had offered as a wage .
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 07:39 pm
@Ionus,
Quote:
So it was greed that led Washington to join the war of Independence as a general.
Ionus wrote:
He certainly was greedy. He was offered a wage for his services, but declined in favour of expenses only. Isnt that lovely ?
Except that his expenses turned out to be many times more than what they had offered as a wage.
The Father of Our Country was a man of Wisdom!





David
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 03:46 am
@OmSigDAVID,
You do know that that member just makes it up as he goes along, don't you? Once again, the two best sources on Washington are Douglas Southall Freeman and Thomas Flexner. Just about anyone else, and especially our friend here, is peddling bullshit.
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 03:56 am
@Setanta,
Good ole **** for brains..if he doesn't know about it, then it doesn't exist and someone MUST have made it up or else he would have known all about it and told us first .

Quote:
the two best sources on Washington
Look at the stupidity inherent in this.... everything about Washington's life must be in these sources.. no other source exists, even if it includes confirmable detail on Washington's life .

Tell me dickhead, how was Washington paid and how much was it ?
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 05:15 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
You do know that that member just makes it up as he goes along, don't you?
Once again, the two best sources on Washington are Douglas Southall Freeman and Thomas Flexner.
Just about anyone else, and especially our friend here, is peddling bullshit.
However that may be: The Father of Our Country was STILL a man of Wisdom, anyway !





David

Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 05:40 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I agree. The silliest part of such a claim, though, is the sheer ignorance of American history. There was a constitutional convention and a reformation of the government precisely because the Continental Congress could not pay its bills. I don't recall from either Freeman or Flexner that Washington made any great money from his service, and certainly a constant (and what ought to have been a needless) worry of his was to find ways to feed, clothe and equip his army. The army mutinied in 1780, 1781 and 1783 because they hadn't been paid, and the continental scrip they had managed to save was almost worthless. Even if Washington had been paid by the Continental Congress for his expenses (which i doubt), the payment would have been nearly worthless. It got so bad, that the Continental Congress no longer paid soldiers in scrip, but gave them bonds issued against the (non-existant) credit of the Continental Congress.

The entire notion that Washington enriched himself through the war, by any means, is an absurdity.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 11:45 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
The Father of Our Country was STILL a man of Wisdom


He was certainly wise as he attacked the British on Christmas Day near Princeton.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 11:52 am
@talk72000,
As usual, you're ill-informed. That attack was at Trenton. The attack near Princeton was several days later.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:08 pm
@Setanta,
I worked in Trenton and it is twenty minutes drive from Princeton. I visited Princeton University.

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&q=map+of+trenton+new+jersey&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&biw=772&bih=435&wrapid=tlif130897090693711&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x89c143482d3dbbb9:0xcf16567f895cd7bc,Trenton,+NJ,+USA&gl=ca&ei=KlH2TaayDOXniAKR0oHyBg&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=1&ved=0CCkQ8gEwAA
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:14 pm
@talk72000,
Which has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that Washington fought the Germans at Trenton on December 26, 1776, and then fought the British at Princeton on January 3, 1777--a week later. Washington's army wasn't "driving" anywhere.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:25 pm
@Setanta,
I said it was near Princeton which is 10 miles from Trenton. You are a bogus "historian" You have no credebtials as an academic historian.

Quote:
British Governor Robert Dinwiddie had received word that the French had come down from Canada and built a fort in the western territory near the Ohio River. The Governor sent Washington and a small force to carry a message to the French to leave English territory


Quote:
GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER


There was no America before the War of Independence so Washinton was a British Officer.

http://www.suite101.com/pages/article_old.cfm/presidents_and_first_ladies/27515



Quote:
Washington's Christmas Campaign
General Washington led the patriots through two motivational victories in a campaign described by historians as the "Christmas Campaign." Washington attacked the British first at Trenton and then at Princeton in order to seize the offensive after losing his hold on New York in the previous year.

Using shrewd judgement, Washington decided to attack the Hessians camped in Trenton on Christmas Day, 1776. He ordered his troops to cross the Delaware River in three columns and take the enemy by surprise. Upon his discovery that the crossing had wet their gunpowder, he ordered the patriots to fix bayonets and they took Trenton at bayonet point. The Americans captured Trenton in little more than an hour of battle, with only minor casualties.


http://www.wpi.edu/academics/Depts/MilSci/Resources/abswash.html
Walter Hinteler
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:29 pm
@talk72000,
Robert Dinwiddie (1693 – 27 July 1770)

.... and Washington was the Commander of the American Continental Army in 1775.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:34 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
After working as a merchant, Dinwiddie entered British government service in 1727 as collector of the customs for Bermuda. In 1738 he was appointed surveyor general (of revenues) for the southern part of America. In 1741 he became a member of the Governor's Council of Virginia.


http://www.biography.com/articles/Robert-Dinwiddie-9275074

Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:35 pm
@talk72000,
Oh yeah, what are your "credebtials?" I haven't claimed to an historian of any description, and one doesn't need to be an historian to point out when you're peddling bullshit.

Washington was not a British officer. At the time Dinwiddie sent him to confront the French in what is now Ohio, he was Major in the Virginia militia. When he marched a force into the west in 1754, he was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Virginia militia, the same rank he held when he volunteered to accompany Braddock's column to what is now Pittsburgh. In large measure, his decision to resign and return to Mount Vernon in December, 1758, was a result of the fact that he was never given a commission in the British Army.

You can make all the snide remarks you want about my "credebtials," it won't change the fact that you routinely peddle bullshit.

The battle of Trenton took place on December 26, 1776, and that's close to Christmas day. The battle of Princeton took place on the subsequent January 3, and it took place 20 miles away. You can backpeddle as furiously as you like, twenty miles in 1777 was not "near Princeton." January 3rd is not Christmas.
Walter Hinteler
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:40 pm
@talk72000,
No problem, but the battles at Princeton and Trenton happened years after Washington resigned from the provincial militia and became a plantation owner.

You should educate yourself about how to get a commission in the British Army and thus become a British officer before accusing others.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:42 pm
@Setanta,
The source for your information is none other than Worcestor Polytechnic Institute Miltary Science, Army ROTC.


Quote:
Using shrewd judgement, Washington decided to attack the Hessians camped in Trenton on Christmas Day, 1776. He ordered his troops to cross the Delaware River in three columns and take the enemy by surprise


I pick their's over your's any day. You should avail yourself with your local library on accuracy.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:46 pm
@talk72000,
I see you've hurried to edit your post. I didn't say that Washington was an American officer, i've said, correctly, that he was an officer of the Virginia militia. You clearly show that you don't know a goddamned thing about this period in history, or the distinction which the British made between an officer of the militia and an officer of the British army. At Fort Necessity, Captain MacKay refused to take orders from Washington because he, MacKay, was an officer of the regular army and Washington was only an officer of the militia.

Washington was never a British officer.

Quote:
The Battle of Trenton took place on December 26, 1776[/u], during the American Revolutionary War, after General George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River north of Trenton, New Jersey. (emphasis added)


Source at Wikipedia

A second battle took place near Trenton on January 2, 1777. You can read about the battle of Assunpink Creek by clicking here.

The battle at Princeton took placed the next day. Your apparently inability to distinguish between those two battles, and sneers about how far apart the two towns are are on a par with your inability to distinguish an officer of the British army and a militia officer.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:48 pm
@talk72000,
No, that's not the source for my information. For the link, i relied on Wikipedia. For my knowledge of Washington, i rely on the biographies of Douglas Southall Freeman and Thomas Flexner.

If anyone needs a trip to the library, it's you.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:48 pm
@Setanta,
It was Britsh. There was no America in 1775. After 1776, yes there was an America NOT before.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 12:49 pm
@talk72000,
I don't think that anyone has problems that Washington decided on Christmas Day to attack the Hessians decided.

Which he did, on December 26.
0 Replies
 
 

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