OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:34 am
@Arella Mae,
Arella Mae wrote:
I lived in Rapid City, South Dakota for awhile a long, long time ago. There was still lots of condemned properties due to the flood they had. I did go see Mt. Rushmore, which was amazing. I think I lived there maybe three or four months. Seeing buffalo is a pretty common occurrence there if I remember correctly. They are amazing looking animals.
How is JJ ?
Did his mom return to him ?





David
Wally Tea
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 08:48 am
@chai2,
I was wondering where you went. Who are you with, by the way?
0 Replies
 
Arella Mae
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:07 am
@OmSigDAVID,
JJ is wonderful and his mom will be home this weekend!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:13 am
@Old Goat,
Actually, they didn't find very much gold, but enough to spark the greed and cupidity of the white boys. George Custer had taken extended leave from the army and travelled in the Dakota territory, and claimed to have found gold, although there is no evidence that he did. He then returned to active duty and took command of the 7th U.S. Cavalry for the campaign to run off the Sioux. He might be said to have made a bad career move in that case.
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:16 am
He at least got a free haircut out of it.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:17 am
@Old Goat,
Always look on the bright side of life . . .
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:19 am
Three wheels on my wagon...

Sorry, wrong tribe.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:22 am
Custer has become a villain in American culture with the fantastic growth of the American Indian Myth (TM). Everywhere, that is, except for Monroe, Michigan, his hometown, where they have a museum and the airport is the George Armstrong Custer airport.
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:25 am
I bet you out of all the various displays in that Museum, Custer's is on the last stand.

You have my permission to press the groan button.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:36 am
It is amazing (well, not that amazing) that for nearly a century, Custer's Last Stand (TM) was seen as some kind of heroic event. In fact, the Sioux and the Arapaho had administered an humiliating defeat to General Crook's column, and then destroyed half of the 7th Cavalry. But they were merely dirty red-skins, so, of course, it was an event of great white boy heroism. No, no, really . . . it was!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:38 am
By the way, they did find one large gold deposit, and that deposit is the reason for Deadwood, South Dakota.
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:42 am
I thought they built that place specifically so that they could make a musical.

0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 09:45 am
Seriously though, is it true that Custer et al greatly underestimated the number of Indians ranged against them?
Am I still allowed to say Indians?

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 11:10 am
@Old Goat,
The 7th Cavalry numbered just under 600 men. The Sioux and Arapaho numbered just under 2000. However, Custer divided his command. Roughly half were with him, about 260 men, and the rest were under the command of Major Reno, with the invalids and a guard mount with the trains of pack horses. So when Custer was attacked, he was outnumbered by about six or seven to one. What was more significant is that he didn't know the ground, and, of course, his opponents did. They were about as well armed as his men were. Additionally, there is now good evidence that his men were suffering the early stages of pernicious, acute lead poisoning from the solder in the canned goods upon which they relied. Battlefield archaeology has dug up severl of Major Reno's men (archaeologists have not been allowed to dig up those already buried), and they show the signs of acute lead poisoning.

The Sioux drove off Reno's command, and Captain Benteen joined himon a knoll where they were able to hold out for three days before the Indians eventually left them alone. Custer's chief scout had told him it was the largest Indian village he had ever seen (he was a "half-breed" Crow-Frenchman himself), but Custer ignored that. He was concerned that the Indians would get away! He drove in the Indian scouts, and sent Benteen a note saying he had the village in sight, had the hostiles on the run, and to come on with the trains. Benteen had a look at it himself, and thought better of it. He crossed the valley of the Little Big Horn and joined Reno.

Immediatelyafterward, Benteen estimated the Indian force at 3000--which was almost twice as many as were actually present. Over the years, Benteen raised his estimate, and many American histories still claim that there were 5000 or 6000 Indians. However, the entire expedition of three columns of cavalry and infantry was based on an estimate that there were no more than 800 Indians on the loose. Their numbers were based on the number of Indians the Indian Agents had estimated had left the reservations. But most of those estimates were made weeks earlier, and it took days, not weeks for the Indians to assemble a force.

The bigger the estimate of the Indian forces, the less the sting of the defeat. Custer was mad, quite apart from the likely effect of chronic lead poisoning. He thought he'd ride out, massacre yet another Indian village and then run for President in the fall.
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 01:27 pm
Fascinating. Thanks for that, Set.
I had no idea about the lead poisoning.

Poor bastards.

Between you and me, I think we've added quite a cheery note to chai's roadtrip thread.
Hope she appreciates it! (insert smiley here)
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 02:03 pm
@Old Goat,
Are you familiar with Sir John Franklin's final and disastrous arctic expedition? There is no doubt now that he and his men were all suffering chronic, pernicioius lead poisoning, again from the lead solder in canned goods.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 02:04 pm
And yes, we are a pair of little rays of sunshine, aren't we?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 02:24 pm
For contrasting views of Custer in films, watch They Died With Their Boots On and then watch Little Big Man back to back. I believe Earl Flynn played Custer in the first.
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 02:27 pm
@Old Goat,
Old Goat wrote:
Between you and me, I think we've added quite a cheery note to chai's roadtrip thread.
Hope she appreciates it! (insert smiley here)


Chai brings out the best in all of us.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 02:28 pm
I wonder if the source of lead poisoning was from Van Camp's pork and beans. I read one time that as far back as the Civil War soldiers were eating them.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Keystone pipeline leaked 16,000 gallons ..... - Discussion by bobsal u1553115
Jennifer Aniston look-a-like - Discussion by talk72000
SD bans almost all abortions - Discussion by Questioner
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/27/2022 at 09:55:38