panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 09:16 am
Don't forget to drop by Chamberlain S Dakota to visit the St Joseph's Indian School.
Here the Lakota tribes are taught to say "May God Bless"

Wakan Tanka Kici Un, by the way.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 09:16 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
The Judges assumed power
What is the source of their power?
For what reason does anyone need to comply
with their judgments ?



izzythepush wrote:
after the last President of the United States was deemed corrupt,
Deemed by whom ?
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 09:21 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Deemed by whom ?

David, do you sometimes have trouble discerning fact from fiction?

Just asking.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 09:38 am
@panzade,
panzade wrote:
Deemed by whom ?

David, do you sometimes have trouble discerning fact from fiction?
Well, he said that it's a good comic strip.
A judge 's judgments r void
unless his court has the power to enforce them.

Jurisdiction is based in power.





David
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 09:45 am
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

Quote:
Today we went to Mt. Rushmore. It was underwhelming. I mean, it's fine and everything, but to me, nothing compared to the natural wonders.


Most over-hyped attraction in America if you ask me.


For me it was Niagara Falls.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 09:48 am
@Mame,
Mame wrote:

panzade wrote:

Quote:
Today we went to Mt. Rushmore. It was underwhelming. I mean, it's fine and everything, but to me, nothing compared to the natural wonders.


Most over-hyped attraction in America if you ask me.


For me it was Niagara Falls.
Thay r not at full force; restrained, to save erosion of the rock.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 10:18 pm
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

Quote:
Today we went to Mt. Rushmore. It was underwhelming. I mean, it's fine and everything, but to me, nothing compared to the natural wonders.


Most over-hyped attraction in America if you ask me.


IMO it's the Riverwalk in San Antonio.

As far as man made things, I find the thousands and thousands of miles of highways, interstates, etc. infinitely more impressive. You're driving for hours and start thinking about all the ground you're covering, and how crews of men had to work to build those roads mile by mile. That's truly amazing.

Oh, the best thing about Mt. Rushmore? There's a big stone wall with the names of all the people who worked on the project etched into it.
Of course (just like looking in the phone book for your own name) I looked to see if my last name was listed there. It was, and the first name was Roland, same as one of my cats.
Look Wally! Roland Crane, Roland Crane!!!

We joked about that off and on for the rest of the trip, making up stories about rolands part in the project.

Re gambling, no, we didn't do any of that. We walked in one casino, and I looked at the slot machines, but now they're all electronic, and frankly, just glancing at them, I couldn't be bothered with figuring out how they worked. Anyway, I think if I was going to gamble, it would have been black jack. Just didn't seem interesting at the time.

Pictures?

To be honest, we didn't even bring a camera. I don't know, the few times I've taken pictures when I've gone somewhere, I never look at them afterwards. Also, it seems like a disruption (to me) of enjoying the moment. I figure people have been traveling for thousands of years, and didn't have a camera with them. I have my memories in my head.

Mame, we went to Niagara Falls about a year and a half ago. I have to say I really enjoyed it. I had gone back when I was a little girl, maybe 7 or 8, so I think I enjoyed seeing it from the perspective of an adult. Plus, for 2 of the nights we were there, we splurged on a suite in a hotel which was the closest one overlooking the Falls, up on a high floor. It was directly out our window. It was very romantic, and I loved how you could hear it roaring when the windows were opened even a crack.

I think the same thing interested me about the Falls, as about the Black Hills and Badlands....the geology.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 10:20 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

Does the salloon where Wild Bill spent his last human minutes remain intact ?



pffft.

You know what?

It's now a t-shirt shop.
I think the furniture is set up as a reinactment down in their basement.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 10:37 pm
@chai2,
panzade wrote:

Quote:
Today we went to Mt. Rushmore. It was underwhelming. I mean, it's fine and everything, but to me, nothing compared to the natural wonders.


Most over-hyped attraction in America if you ask me.
chai2 wrote:


IMO it's the Riverwalk in San Antonio.

As far as man made things, I find the thousands and thousands of miles of highways, interstates, etc. infinitely more impressive. You're driving for hours and start thinking about all the ground you're covering, and how crews of men had to work to build those roads mile by mile. That's truly amazing.

Oh, the best thing about Mt. Rushmore? There's a big stone wall with the names of all the people who worked on the project etched into it.
Of course (just like looking in the phone book for your own name) I looked to see if my last name was listed there. It was, and the first name was Roland, same as one of my cats.
Look Wally! Roland Crane, Roland Crane!!!

We joked about that off and on for the rest of the trip, making up stories about rolands part in the project.

Re gambling, no, we didn't do any of that. We walked in one casino, and I looked at the slot machines, but now they're all electronic, and frankly, just glancing at them, I couldn't be bothered with figuring out how they worked. Anyway, I think if I was going to gamble, it would have been black jack. Just didn't seem interesting at the time.

Pictures?

To be honest, we didn't even bring a camera. I don't know, the few times I've taken pictures when I've gone somewhere, I never look at them afterwards. Also, it seems like a disruption (to me) of enjoying the moment. I figure people have been traveling for thousands of years, and didn't have a camera with them. I have my memories in my head.

Mame, we went to Niagara Falls about a year and a half ago. I have to say I really enjoyed it. I had gone back when I was a little girl, maybe 7 or 8, so I think I enjoyed seeing it from the perspective of an adult. Plus, for 2 of the nights we were there, we splurged on a suite in a hotel which was the closest one overlooking the Falls, up on a high floor. It was directly out our window. It was very romantic, and I loved how you could hear it roaring when the windows were opened even a crack.

I think the same thing interested me about the Falls, as about the Black Hills and Badlands....the geology.
I had court in Buffalo some years ago.
I took a cab to Niagara Falls and the Maid of the Mist boat ride
and the walk on the wooden scaffolding.
I leaned over and washed my hands in Niagara Falls to be able to remember that I 'd done it.
Its lit up in colored lite at nite.




David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 10:41 pm
@chai2,

OmSigDAVID wrote:

Does the salloon where Wild Bill spent his last human minutes remain intact ?

chai2 wrote:
pffft.

You know what?

It's now a t-shirt shop.
I think the furniture is set up as a reinactment down in their basement.
How disappointing!! Its a travesty!

I don 't think he was shot in a basement.





David
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 11:07 pm
@chai2,
I could not agree more about taking pictures while traveling.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2011 11:39 pm
@roger,
Its good to keep a journal
to help u remember the best parts of your trip; your whole life.





David
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 01:24 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Maybe. Maybe not. I've found stacks of photos around, and wondered just what I was thinking of when I took them. And like chai, taking them does seem to distract from the experience.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 01:29 am
@roger,
I was recommending a textual journal
setting forth what the author believes worthy of recording.

It is held in some mental health care communities
that this is about as good as visiting a psychologist
and it saves commuting time and hunting for parking space.

Catharsis





David
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 06:19 am
@OmSigDAVID,
You're reading way too much into this David. Judge Dredd is a sci-fi comic strip inspired mainly by the Dirty Harry films. That's all it is. I don't think anyone would suggest the system of jurisprudence in Mega-City One is a suitable model for any society. The Judges did defeat the robot rebellion lead by Call-Me-Kenneth. They also saved Mega-City One from Judge Death, and the dark Judges from the negative dimension. I don't think any American president has ever done anything like that.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 09:13 am
@roger,
roger wrote:

Maybe. Maybe not. I've found stacks of photos around, and wondered just what I was thinking of when I took them. And like chai, taking them does seem to distract from the experience.


This guy I work with got married a couple of years ago, and went on his honeymoon to Italy.

Afterwards, when he came to the next group meeting, he brought a stack of photos. I was looking forward to seeing them.

EVERY single picture was the same. Siena, the colossium in Rome, etc. etc. showed a thin border of the location, with his new bride taking up 85% of the photo, front and center.
He might as well have taken 50 pictures with her standing in front of their garage door.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 09:15 am
@chai2,
Very Happy
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  3  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 09:39 am
It is funny about tourist attractions. All of my cousins live in Germany. In order to visit every one of them, I traveled to 14 different towns in Germany. In each town some cousin would point out a centuries-old tower where they once burned witches. In the last town, I simply said to a cousin, "Hey! I bet this is a tower where they used to burn witches!"
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 09:56 am
@wandeljw,
What a shame that they didn't show you the beer halls, wandel Wink

0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 May, 2011 12:16 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

izzythepush wrote:
The Judges assumed power
What is the source of their power?
For what reason does anyone need to comply
with their judgments ?




The main reason anyone would comply with a Judge is the lawgiver.



Justice Dept. Lawgiver MK II

The Lawgiver is a fictional weapon used by the Judges in Judge Dredd and related series that appear in the UK comic books 2000 AD and the Judge Dredd Megazine.

The Lawgiver is a handgun featuring semi- and fully-automatic fire, manual and automatic focusing and targeting, plus an in-built computer capable of controlling its operation. It fires a range of speciality ammunition. An in-line gunsight shows the view directly down the barrel. A Lawgiver can only be operated by its designated Judge owner, whose palm print is programmed into the gun's memory.


An earlier weapon appeared in the Origins storyline. Though little was known about the gun itself, it was capable of firing standard and armour piercing rounds.

Security

Should an attempt be made by an unauthorised person to use the Lawgiver, it will explode in that person's hand. Recognising that this generally practical safeguard can sometimes impede Judges in the execution of their duties, the Justice Department computers contain instructions on bypassing Lawgiver palm-recognition systems. These instructions can be accessed by senior Judges, but are generally employed only in severe emergencies. Judge Dredd demonstrates this process in the story "Goodnight Kiss" after his partner is killed by Jonni Kiss.

In the story "The Narcos Connection", criminal Nero Narcos sabotaged a new batch of upgraded lawgivers by programming them to self-destruct when used by their authorised users (once they received a radio signal, so the rogue command took effect in all weapons simultaneously). This resulted in large numbers of judges being crippled or killed at the precise moment they were attacked by Narcos's "Assassinator" robots at the beginning of the Second Robot War in 2121.

Ammunition

The gun has a maximum range of up to three miles and has six distinct settings:

Standard execution - A standard bullet, with identical effects to normal kinetic energy projectile weapons.
Heat Seeker or Hot Shot - A standard bullet propelled by the unstable element, 'Argon 886'. Heatseeker rounds lock onto the target's heat source, enabling the Judge to target fleeing perps, accurately fire in low-light situations and so forth.
Ricochet - A metal bullet coated with rubber. Ricochet rounds can bounce off solid surfaces while retaining enough kinetic energy to penetrate flesh. This enables the Judge to, for example, kill a perp that is using a human shield, bouncing their shot off a back wall and hitting the target from behind.
Incendiary - Capable of setting its target on fire. Less widely used due to practicalities of incinerating targets in built-up city areas, although useful against unconventional adversaries such as Judge Death.
Armour Piercing - Armour piercing rounds are extremely dense and contain a more powerful charge for higher muzzle velocity. Useful against cybernetic criminals and armoured opponents. When used against human targets, it can travel through multiple targets.
High-Explosive (Hi-Ex) - A round containing an amount of extremely concentrated high explosive. Judges must employ caution when using this extremely dangerous round; the blast caused by the exploding bullets can just as easily harm those firing as well as the target. Generally used rarely; against crowding attackers or large/dangerous foes.
Some stories by Judge Dredd creator John Wagner have added a stun bullet, while stories by Gordon Rennie have included a stunner beam (which doesn't always work). An "exorcist" bullet for use against supernatural enemies was developed by Gordon Rennie. These and the six modes of fire listed above are canon. The Judge Dredd audio drama Wanted: Dredd Or Alive has a Tracer bullet, which allows Judges to electronically track what they've shot. One story had a judge fire a marker shell, a round which tags its target with green paint.

Some publications replace the standard bullet with the Grenade setting. In addition, the novelisations of David Bishop replaced the Incendiary round with a Gas round, which released a cloud of Stumm gas, the Mega City equivalent of CS or tear gas. Other issues have shown the new Lawgiver to have a limited number of close-range electrical stun attacks capable of incapacitating large numbers of opponents at close range.

0 Replies
 
 

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