7
   

Why are mosquitoes so darn MEAN?

 
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2011 04:15 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Sure...but I remain unconvinced that the saliva could remain localised enough to be sucked back up by a mosquito left to browse contentedly.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2011 04:16 pm
@dlowan,
Perhaps the saliva could be applied topically. Not necessarily injected but added to the top of the skin.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2011 04:18 pm
@tsarstepan,
By the mosquito? I think it goes in allright.

Or are you suggesting mosquito saliva as an anti-irritant?

Who will milk the mosquito?
0 Replies
 
wayne
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2011 01:39 pm
It must make some difference where the mosquito bites you. Once in awhile I will get a bite that is far worse than others. Last summer I had one bite my finger, it must have been right on the vein, I could feel the burning itch travel all the way up to my elbow. That was the worst one I ever had, my arm itched on the inside, it was maddening.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2011 11:15 pm
@wayne,
Fingers are the WORST!!! And the closer to the bones of the finger that are the worster it gets.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2011 11:44 pm
mosquitos have all kinds of nasty nasty bacterial agents. Those not carrying things like malaria typhoid and Rross River/ Murray Valley encephalitis carry other less dangerouse bacteria and viruses.

I suspect that the bites that have a more marked effect have a more irritating bacterial agent.
Mouth parts are decidedly disgusting when it comes to bacteria and not just on mosquitos.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2011 11:49 pm
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:

mosquitos have all kinds of nasty nasty bacterial agents. Those not carrying things like malaria typhoid and Rross River/ Murray Valley encephalitis carry other less dangerouse bacteria and viruses.

I suspect that the bites that have a more marked effect have a more irritating bacterial agent.
Mouth parts are decidedly disgusting when it comes to bacteria and not just on mosquitos.




You speaking to the woman who has twice had cellulitis from spiders' filthy little choppers!
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2011 11:53 pm
You know of course to remove water from pot plant saucers around your home?
Any idea where the blighters are breeding?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2011 11:58 pm
@dadpad,
Probably in the plant saucers on my balcony...but the pots are too heavy to remove to empty the saucers.

I try not to have water in them...but sometimes there just IS water there.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2011 12:11 am
@dlowan,
A few drops of kerosene in each saucer will fix them. It spreads a light oily film over the water surface which the wrigglers are unable to breathe through.
the oil stays on the water surface so it doesnt get sucked up by the plant and when it dries out the oily film sticks to the sides of the pot and saucer.
We used to use a couple of teaspoonfula in our water tank way back when it was the only water supply we had.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2011 02:39 am
@dadpad,
Been wondering if that would work.

I'll try it, thank you.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2011 04:03 am
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:
I am really allergic to mosquitoes, and they either especially like to bite me,
or I notice bites that others don't because of the intensity of my reaction.

Anyway....I just killed the little smegger
that has been biting me in my study this morning.
a racial slur, after a revenge-based killing
0 Replies
 
Clarentino
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 09:18 am
@dlowan,
If they don't find a vein to give them a meal on their first attempt they will keep making new holes until they do, then feed until they're full.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 09:28 am
Posting months later here.. but, re the water accumulating in planting pot saucers, I wonder if a good basting syringe (one of those with a steel needle-like attachment) would work. Or, failing that, a regular syringe/needle, just for that purpose, syringe and needle varying in size relative to the amount of water.

So handy for the home, old lab tools and flasks.. too bad I never absconded with any.
0 Replies
 
coluber2001
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2011 01:11 pm
Ordinarily the female mosquito will only bite once--assuming she gets her fill. When her belly is full it cuts off a nerve, so she is unable to feed again until her eggs develop and she lays a clutch. Mosquitoes can and do lay multiple clutches, but it takes a couple of days for her eggs to develop after a meal.

The mosquito that repeately bites is having difficulty drawing up enough blood at the first source. Male mosquitoes don't and can't drink blood; they subsist on plant nectars.

Any reaction from a mosquito bite is an allergic reaction, but, obviously some people have more severe reactions. Supposedlly, after enough bites, one becomes immune.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2011 04:36 pm
@coluber2001,
Actually, with allergies, repeated exposure can make it worse. That's what's happening with mosquitoes and me, and what happened with bees and me.

It can also, as you say, help the allergy to settle.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2011 04:38 pm
@coluber2001,
coluber2001 wrote:
...Supposedlly, after enough bites, one becomes immune.


HA! "Supposedly" is right! Believe me, if that were possible, I'd have been immune for decades now! I'm a veritable mosquito magnet.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2011 05:26 pm
@Eva,
Fer sure.

I used to be super-allergic (like, major swelling -- a bite near my eye made the eye swell shut for a while), after many years as a human pincushion (Minnesota state bird = mosquito) I now just get small red bumps. But I get 'em, and man they're itchy. <reaches down to scratch ankle>
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2011 10:21 pm
@sozobe,
Try Benadryl spray, soz. (OTC, available at most drugstores.) It works better than anything else I've found. Spray it on & rub it in.

I keep two spray bottles in the house and one in my purse. The mosquitos are out in force here from May 'til November.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jul, 2017 11:27 am
@dlowan,
To Shrink Mosquito Population, Scientists Are Releasing 20 Million Mosquitoes
0 Replies
 
 

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