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Sci-Fi nerd rage

 
 
DrewDad
 
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 09:30 am
George RR Martin wrote:
What if I f*ck it up at the end? What if I do a Lost?


Damon Lindelof wrote:
I’ve just been informed George is working on his feud response. I’ll have it in FIVE YEARS!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 4 • Views: 1,052 • Replies: 16
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Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 09:33 am
@DrewDad,
He's already fucked it up, that guy is a total douchebag

Cycloptichorn
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 10:36 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Damon Lindelof wrote:
Winter IS coming, bitch
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 10:39 am
@DrewDad,
haha!

Man, I can't tell you how much disdain I have for that guy. Not only does his series suck to begin with, his whole attitude towards the fact that it takes him over 5 years now to **** out crappy sequels is a huge disservice to his fan base, deluded as they are.

Other great writers manage 1-2 books a year... lazy bastard

Cycloptichorn
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 10:42 am
@Cycloptichorn,
I've really enjoyed this series, but I'm not a fan of Martin as a person. He shows great disdain for his fans.
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 10:42 am
apropos of nothing in this thread but it's sci-fi theme, here's todays savage chicken cartoon
http://www.savagechickens.com/wp-content/uploads/chickenprocrastinator.jpg
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 10:43 am
@djjd62,
"Come with me if you want to live!!!"

0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 12:03 pm
@djjd62,
"Did you plan this?"

"No, I'm just winging it."

0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 12:14 pm
Neil Gaiman to a fan who complained that Martin might be slacking...

"George R.R. Martin is not your bitch."

Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 12:34 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

Neil Gaiman to a fan who complained that Martin might be slacking...

"George R.R. Martin is not your bitch."


No, but he is a dick, and I can't believe people give him money.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 12:37 pm
@Irishk,
Martin's made several promises that he hasn't kept. His publication date is between him and his publisher; I have no say in the matter. But you also don't dangle treats in front of people, and then snatch them away.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 12:46 pm
@DrewDad,
I think Gaiman's reply to the frustrated Martin fan was just author defending author. Here's more of his opinion from his journal entry of a couple years ago...

Quote:
George R.R. Martin is not your bitch.

This is a useful thing to know, perhaps a useful thing to point out when you find yourself thinking that possibly George is, indeed, your bitch, and should be out there typing what you want to read right now.

People are not machines. Writers and artists aren't machines.

You're complaining about George doing other things than writing the books you want to read as if your buying the first book in the series was a contract with him: that you would pay over your ten dollars, and George for his part would spend every waking hour until the series was done, writing the rest of the books for you.

No such contract existed. You were paying your ten dollars for the book you were reading, and I assume that you enjoyed it because you want to know what happens next.

It seems to me that the biggest problem with series books is that either readers complain that the books used to be good but that somewhere in the effort to get out a book every year the quality has fallen off, or they complain that the books, although maintaining quality, aren't coming out on time.

Both of these things make me glad that I am not currently writing a series, and make me even gladder that the decade that I did write series things, in Sandman, I was young, driven, a borderline workaholic, and very fortunate. (and even then, towards the end, I was taking five weeks to write a monthly comic, with all the knock-on problems in deadlines that you would expect from that).

For me, I would rather read a good book, from a contented author. I don't really care what it takes to produce that.

Some writers need a while to charge their batteries, and then write their books very rapidly. Some writers write a page or so every day, rain or shine. Some writers run out of steam, and need to do whatever it is they happen to do until they're ready to write again. Sometimes writers haven't quite got the next book in a series ready in their heads, but they have something else all ready instead, so they write the thing that's ready to go, prompting cries of outrage from people who want to know why the author could possibly write Book X while the fans were waiting for Book Y.

I remember hearing an upset comics editor telling a roomful of other editors about a comics artist who had taken a few weeks off to paint his house. The editor pointed out, repeatedly, that for the money the artist would have been paid for those weeks' work he could easily have afforded to hire someone to paint his house, and made money too. And I thought, but did not say, “But what if he wanted to paint his house?”

I blew a deadline recently. Terminally blew it. First time in 25 years I've sighed and said, “I can't do this, and you won't get your story.” It was already late, I was under a bunch of deadline pressure, my father died, and suddenly the story, too, was dead on the page. I liked the voice it was in, but it wasn't working, and eventually, rather than drive the editors and publishers mad waiting for a story that wasn't going to come, I gave up on it and apologised, worried that I could no longer write fiction.

I turned my attention to the next deadline waiting – a script. It flowed easily and delightfully, was the most fun I've had writing anything in ages, all the characters did exactly what I had hoped they would do, and the story was better than I had dared to hope.

Sometimes it happens like that. You don't choose what will work. You simply do the best you can each time. And you try to do what you can to increase the likelihood that good art will be created.

And sometimes, and it's as true of authors as it is of readers, you have a life. People in your world get sick or die. You fall in love, or out of love. You move house. Your aunt comes to stay. You agreed to give a talk half-way around the world five years ago, and suddenly you realise that that talk is due now. Your last book comes out and the critics vociferously hated it and now you simply don't feel like writing another. Your cat learns to levitate and the matter must be properly documented and investigated. There are deer in the apple orchard. A thunderstorm fries your hard disk and fries the backup drive as well...

And life is a good thing for a writer. It's where we get our raw material, for a start. We quite like to stop and watch it.

The economics of scale for a writer mean that very few of us can afford to write 5,000 page books and then break them up and publish them annually once they are done. So writers with huge stories, or ones that, as Sandman did, grow in the telling, are going to write them and have them published as they go along.

And if you are waiting for a new book in a long ongoing series, whether from George or from Pat Rothfuss or from someone else...

Wait. Read the original book again. Read something else. Get on with your life. Hope that the author is writing the book you want to read, and not dying, or something equally as dramatic. And if he paints the house, that's fine.

And Gareth, in the future, when you see other people complaining that George R.R. Martin has been spotted doing something other than writing the book they are waiting for, explain to them, more politely than I did the first time, the simple and unanswerable truth: George R. R. Martin is not working for you.

Hope that helps.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 01:54 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

I think Gaiman's reply to the frustrated Martin fan was just author defending author.

No, I get that. Artists, including writers and musicians, work for themselves. Sometimes they do it well enough that people will pay them for the privilege of reading, viewing, or listening to their work.

But don't make promise after promise that you don't keep....
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 03:37 pm
@DrewDad,
I have no idea who this guy is.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 04:09 pm
@littlek,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_R._R._Martin

Quote:
Martin has been criticized by many fans for the long delay between books in the A Song of Ice and Fire series, most recently the many-year gap before the next volume, A Dance with Dragons, which has led the author to respond, accusing angry fans of unfairly demanding he devote all his time to the series.[20][21] Many of these fans have become concerned that Martin will leave the series unfinished by the author's possible death in the same fashion of Deceased author Robert Jordan and the Wheel of Time series.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 04:32 pm
@DrewDad,
Yeah, I wiki'd him. Never hoid of him.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Apr, 2011 04:40 pm
he wrote one of my favourite stories in Omni magazine, Sandkings
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandkings_(novelette)

beyond that i've not read him much, i did read the story he had in the legends anthology
0 Replies
 
 

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