PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 07:30 am
Great Quote from Liz:

"It's not the having, it's the getting."
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 08:43 am
@Phoenix32890,
Phoenix32890 wrote:

Did anyone mention, "Suddenly, Last Summer"? She played with Katherine Hepburn and Montgomery Clift. I loved her in that film.

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3005651968/tt0053318


Montgomery Clift was also gay, but as far as I know he didn't die of AIDS. I think he was a suicide victim.
0 Replies
 
IknowIknow
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 10:43 am
@dlowan,
So Sad
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 10:44 am
@Ragman,
Quote:

Anyone would be happy to look that good at any age, much less any over-40.

She seems to have let herself age naturally, without resorting to plastic surgery or a lot of Botox, and she still remained quite beautiful .
This photo is from 2007
http://media.kansascity.com/smedia/2011/03/04/10/People_Elizabeth_Taylor_LA501.standalone.prod_affiliate.81.jpg

Taylor was also a successful businesswoman. She was the first celebrity to launch her own perfume line. I wore her "Passion" scent for several years.

Anyone else here like, "The Last Time I Saw Paris"? Nice, one-hanky movie.

TCM will have a 24 hour marathon of Taylor's movies on April 10th. I plan on recording several on my DVR cable box so I don't miss them.
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 01:39 pm
@firefly,
24 hours, hell, I bet they end up having to leave a few good ones out. Man oh man she was a beautiful lady.
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 03:10 pm
@jespah,
Unfortunately, jespah, they'll be leaving out many of them. But they seem to have a decent selection from varying points in her film career. I'm even looking forward to the Lassie movie.
Quote:

Elizabeth Taylor Memorial Program on 4/10
Turner Classic Movies will remember the life and career of two-time Academy Award®-winning actress and beloved humanitarian Elizabeth Taylor on Sunday, April 10. The 24-hour memorial tribute, which is set to begin at 6 a.m. (ET/PT), will include both of Taylor's Oscar®-winning performances, with Butterfield 8 (1960) at 8 p.m. (ET) and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) at 10 p.m. (ET).

TCM's tribute will also feature Taylor in such memorable films as the family classics Lassie Come Home (1943) and National Velvet (1944); the delightful comedies Father of the Bride (1950) and Father's Little Dividend (1951); the historical epic Ivanhoe (1952); and the powerful dramas Giant (1956), Raintree County (1957) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958). Also included is the spy drama Conspirator (1949), with Taylor in her first adult role.

The following is a complete schedule of TCM's April 10 memorial tribute to Elizabeth Taylor (all times Eastern):
6 a.m. - Lassie Come Home (1943), with Roddy McDowall and Edmund Gwenn; directed by Fred M. Wilcox.
7:30 a.m. - National Velvet (1944), with Mickey Rooney, Anne Revere and Angela Lansbury; directed by Clarence Brown.
10 a.m. - Conspirator (1952), with Robert Taylor and Robert Flemyng; directed by Victor Saville.
11:30 a.m. - Father of the Bride (1950), with Spencer Tracy, Billie Burke, Joan Bennett and Don Taylor; directed by Vincente Minnelli.
1:15 a.m. - Father's Little Dividend (1951), with Spencer Tracy, Billie Burke, Joan Bennett and Don Taylor; directed by Vincente Minnelli.
2:45 p.m. - Raintree County (1957), with Montgomery Clift, Eva Marie Saint, Lee Marvin, Rod Taylor and Agnes Moorehead; directed by Edward Dmytryk.
6 p.m. - Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), with Paul Newman and Burl Ives; directed by Richard Brooks.
8 p.m. - Butterfield 8 (1960), with Laurence Harvey and Eddie Fisher; directed by Daniel Mann.
10 p.m. - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), with Richard Burton, George Segal and Sandy Dennis; directed by Mike Nichols.
12:30 a.m. - Giant (1956), with James Dean and Rock Hudson; directed by George Stevens.
4 a.m. - Ivanhoe (1952), with Robert Taylor and Joan Fontaine; directed by Richard Thorpe.

In addition to TCM's on-air tribute to Taylor, the 2011 TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood will feature a special 60th anniversary screening of her brilliant performance opposite Montgomery Clift in George Stevens' A Place in the Sun (1951). The TCM Classic Film Festival takes place April 28-May 1.
http://www.tcm.com/this-month/movie-news.html?id=383788&name=Elizabeth-Taylor-Memorial-Program-on-4-10

They have a nice, but brief, bio of her film career at the above link.

Renaldo Dubois
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 08:00 pm
She was an okay actress, at times guilty of overacting, but she was gorgeous and unbearably desirable.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2011 08:07 pm
@Renaldo Dubois,
That is what makes the world go around. Opinions can and do vary all the time about who is talented actor. The vast majority of people seem to agree she was both a good and sometimes great actress as well as a gorgeous woman. She made a lot of studios very rich and won several Academy Awards.

For those that have doubts about how good she was as an actor, watch (or watch again) "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" as a starting point. If you've seen it recently and still think it was NOT a great acting job, then your criteria and mine are not in the same ballpark.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:19 am
@Ragman,
I think that the Oscars are often subjective but, at some point, when you win more than one of them (like Tom Hanks, Sally Field, Russell Crowe, Meryl Streep, Jack Nicholson, Hilary Swank, Katherine Hepburn and others have done), at some point it's not a fluke anymore -- probably, at some point in time, multiple nominations, even without wins, over a long period, have got to yield to a determination that there's some quality there.

No doubt she made some dreck (e. g. The Flintstones). But there are a lotta diamonds out there amidst the coal.

PS The photo I had found was apparently from the era of the White Diamonds perfume ad campaign, and I believe it was a part of that.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:31 am
@jespah,
Nobody won more Academy Awards than Walt Disney (24). How bout that as validation of a talent
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:35 am
@farmerman,
He had not nearly the pretty face and was as hawt as she was. He had no tatas ty speak of either! Plus his perfume smelled a lot like cheese, too.

The fact is he was ******* Goofy! Shocked
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:38 am
@jespah,
I general I think Liz was nearly untouchable from mid-to-late-'50s to about late-'60s. In the early '70s she made some career-clinkers.

The movie Cleopatra was fascinating to watch as far as celebrity pairings and as a statement of the state of epic movie-making but was a directorial nightmare of excesses - a disjointed mess, particularly the 2nd half.

If they ever restore the movie to the full 6 hrs (from 4hr) it could be make it more integral and watchable, but as it stands it failed sadly as a real art form or a classic. The movie itself was purely a visual wonder, but the lines and lines of script-writing was overly long, speechified and was stilted in its ability to rivet the viewer.

Off to the beach for me.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:42 am
@farmerman,
Actually, wasn't it Georg Solti (for scores and the like) who won the most? I could be mistaken.

There is a lot of talent -- c'mon, you know this. You may not love Disney but there is something there -- a separation, certainly, should be made between the award-winning cinema and the like versus the theme park (gag). Does Tom Hanks stop being a good actor just because he was in Bachelor Party?
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:59 am
@jespah,
BTW, It's my understanding to see it in the better version (so far), one should see the recently restored DVD version of the film, not the savagely cut older version of the film.

************

Not sure. IMHO, from my memory, I thought the music was not memorable. I'll look that up about how it faired.

I seem to recall the conductor or the musicasl score possibly winning awards. When I recall hearing it, I recall lots of grandiose movement and tons of bass and larger-than-life dynamics. Poking around. BRB.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 06:06 am
@jespah,
Alex North won the award for the Best Music, Score - Substantially Original, but IMHO it was not an AA shining hour.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 06:15 am
@jespah,
I was kidding about Disney. The effects of humor gets lost easily online - especially mine.

Disney was magnificent in quite a few of his efforts. IMHO, Fantasia was a work of art for the ages. The restored version is a collector's item.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 06:21 am
Elizabeth Taylor: An ardent Zionist

Elizabeth Taylor, convert to Judaism, Zionist, passes away at 79
Posted On March 24 , 2011 (1)Category - ShareThis
Hillel Fendel
IsraelNationalNews


ELIZABETH TAYLOR seen here with co-star and husband, RICHARD BURTON

An ardent Zionist has passed away: Actress Elizabeth Taylor, who died on Wednesday in Los Angeles from heart failure at the age of 79.


The Zionist Organization of America (ZOA) issued a statement of mourning for Taylor, announcing that she had been converted to Judaism in 1959 by a former ZOA President, Reform Rabbi Max Nussbaum.


The ZOA statement listed a series of efforts Taylor made for Israel and the Jewish community, including her purchase of $100,000 in Israel Bonds in 1959, her participation in raising $840,000 for Israel in a 1967 London gala, and her cancellation of a visit to Moscow after the Soviet Union lashed out at Israel following the 1967 Six Day War.


In addition, she was one of 60 prominent women to sign a statement in 1975 to then-UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim, condemning the General Assembly’s infamous Zionism-is-Racism resolution. Taylor offered herself as a hostage when 104 Jews aboard an Air France airbus were held hostage by PLO terrorists at Uganda’s Entebbe Airport, from which they were rescued in a spectacular Israeli commando mission on July 4, 1976, America’s 200th birthday.


Taylor frequently visited Israel and met with its leadership, including Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1983. In 1987, she signed a petition seeking the release from Soviet prison of leading refusenik Ida Nudel.


Elizabeth Taylor’s pro-Israel activism led to the banning of her films in several Arab countries. After she bought $100,000 in Israel Bonds in 1959, the United Arab Republic (now Egypt) banned all her movies. Gen. Essam Elmasri, head of the Cairo regional bureau of the Israel Boycott Office, said at the time that she would not be allowed into Egypt because she had adopted the Jewish faith and “supports Israeli causes.”

JewsFor Sarah.com
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 06:36 am
@jespah,
OK. Researched it and found the most watchable format is 4-hr DVD version by Fox whose release Date: April 03, 2001

This version restores essential portions that were excised by the idiots that brought it down to the theater 3-hr version from 1963 that bastardized it. This DVD version is alleged by cinemaphiles to make it infinitely more watchable and maintains its coninuity - particlarly for the essential Burton's and Martin Landau's characters.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 06:38 am
@Miller,
As stated before, Egypt rescinded the ban on the Cleopatra movie.
0 Replies
 
Arella Mae
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 07:28 am
@firefly,
Oh I had forgotten about Raintree County! What a scandalous movie that was for the times. I am definitely going to be watching that one again. She was marvelous in it.
0 Replies
 
 

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