High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jul, 2011 06:48 am
@realjohnboy,
It's the same part of the ocean floor that moved in the record Richter 9 - they had another one, Richter 6.7, on June 23rd, more aftershocks are expected.
http://www.cbc.ca/gfx/images/news/topstories/2011/07/09/li-japan-quake-map620.jpg
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  0  
Reply Sun 10 Jul, 2011 03:28 pm
From NHK:

TEPCO: Quake caused no problems at nuclear plants

Tokyo Electric Power Company says it has found no problems with its Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power plants as a result of Sunday's quake.

TEPCO says it ordered Daiichi plant workers to move away from coastal areas to higher ground after tsunami advisories were issued for the Fukushima coast. It also stopped moving low-level contaminated water from the plant to a giant steel storage barge.

The company confirms the safety of all the workers.

TEPCO says the work to inject cooling water into the reactors is proceeding as usual. It adds that no problem was found with external power supply.

As for radiation readings, the company says no changes were detected at monitoring posts around the 2 plants.

Tohoku Electric Power Company says it has found no problems with its Onagawa nuclear plant in Miyagi Prefecture and Higashidori plant in Aomori Prefecture. It says their reactors were not in operation at the time of the quake.

Sunday, July 10, 2011 12:51 +0900 (JST)


Challenges remain 4 months after March disaster


Four months have passed since the March 11th earthquake and tsunami hit northeastern Japan. A large number of people are still living in evacuation centers and removal of debris is moving ahead slowly.

More than 111,000 people are still living in shelters after losing their homes in the disaster, or having to flee the effects of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

About 37,000 units of temporary housing, out of more than 50,000 units required, have been completed. Plans have been drawn up to finish the construction, except in some municipalities, including Kesennuma City, Miyagi Prefecture.

However, some temporary homes built far from central areas, on land flooded by the tsunami, are still vacant.

People whose temporary units are far from their former homes are in need of assistance. Those living alone in temporary housing after losing family members are also in need of help.

Meanwhile, progress is slow in removing rubble--a key part of the reconstruction process.

The Environment Ministry says Iwate Prefecture has moved 52 percent of the wreckage of buildings destroyed by the tsunami to temporary storage sites.

Miyagi Prefecture has dealt with 30 percent of such debris and Fukushima Prefecture lags behind with 27 percent.

The state is working to reduce the burden on municipalities and speed up removal of debris. Last week, the Cabinet approved a bill that would allow the central government to sign contracts with firms specializing in rubble disposal.

Another challenge is job creation, a key to rebuilding the livelihoods of disaster survivors. In Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima, the 3 worst hit prefectures, more than 130,000 people are currently out of work. The number of job offers registered at job placement centers in those hard-hit areas stands at about 75,000.

Monday, July 11, 2011 05:42 +0900 (JST)
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2011 09:40 pm
Frpm NHK:

High level contamination in reactor building found

The operator of the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant says it has detected airborne radioactive materials up to 65 times above the government's standard inside the No. 2 reactor building.

Tokyo Electric Power Company has been conducting an investigation inside the 3 reactor buildings and in areas surrounding the buildings since early this month.

On Monday, the plant operator said robots have detected airborne cesium-134 inside the No.2 reactor building ranging from 40 to 65 times above the government's standard.

The buildup of the radioactive air inside reactor buildings is believed to have originated from explosions and steam leaking from the damaged reactors.

TEPCO says that it's necessary to confirm the origin and amount of radioactive materials and to reduce the density of the contamination so that work can begin to bring the reactors under control.

Monday, July 11, 2011 21:52 +0900 (JST)


TEPCO prepares for nitrogen injection

The operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant will begin fixing pipelines at the No. 3 reactor on Tuesday afternoon in preparation for injecting nitrogen into its container.

Tokyo Electric Power Company says workers confirmed last Friday that pipes could be connected to the container.

TEPCO plans to inject nitrogen into the container in an effort to avoid a hydrogen explosion. The utility has set a target of July 17th to complete the operation. Nitrogen was injected into the No. 1 reactor in April and No. 2 reactor in June.

The utility on Monday reported its plan to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency and described safety measures to limit workers' radiation exposure.

TEPCO also told the agency how the injection will impact the container.

The company says it wants to begin the injection as soon as it obtains approval from the safety agency.

TEPCO also said that 6 workers have been exposed to a level of radiation higher than the 250-millisieverts emergency limit since the accident. It said the levels ranged from 308 to 678 millisieverts.

Tuesday, July 12, 2011 03:29 +0900 (JST)
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2011 09:50 pm
@Butrflynet,
Quote:
High level contamination in reactor building found
Lets face it, they dont know where the fuel is, or what it is doing. All of this water is delaying dealing with the fuel for months. What I cant or the life of me understand is why we still dont know what is going on the the fuel pools, it seems to me that getting a robot onto there should be doable.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jul, 2011 04:50 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
High level contamination in reactor building found
Lets face it, they dont know where the fuel is, or what it is doing. All of this water is delaying dealing with the fuel for months. What I cant or the life of me understand is why we still dont know what is going on the the fuel pools, it seems to me that getting a robot onto there should be doable.

The only reason I bother to address your apparently incurable ignorance is that this thread is read by many more people than those posting:

1. Where the fuel is is unknown to you only - it has melted and sits at the bottom reactor vessel - and it's not "going" anywhere:
http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/uploadedImages/wnn/Images/Fukushima%20Daiichi%201%20-%20fuel%20melt.jpg
2. Robots have been inside all fuel pools since May; temperature measurements in all of them are close to normal - which means there are no nuclear reactions going on in there - and there's been visual inspection as well confirming this result. Try reading reliable sources - so many have been posted in these pages that you really have no excuse for any more Chicken Little posts worrying people needlessly. Here's another source - written in simple English - since the Fukushima nuclide analysis on the previous page obviously went over your head: http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/default.aspx
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jul, 2011 05:07 am
@High Seas,
Admittedly our own NRC is partly to blame for the disinformation abundance on the Fukushima plant; an investigation is underway on one commissioner:
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2011/jun/15/us-us-japan-nuclear-3rd-ld-writethru/
Quote:
....Inspector General Hubert T. Bell said Jaczko manipulated the panel's four other commissioners by selectively withholding information on a crucial safety review of the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump in Nevada. Jaczko's actions allowed him to shut down the review last year without a vote of the full commission.

Bell told the House Energy and Commerce Committee that Jaczko's conduct was not criminal but added, "It's not an upfront way to do business."

Several agency scientists and a former NRC chairman also have questioned Jaczko's actions, and at least two GOP lawmakers have called for him to resign
.

High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Jul, 2011 03:45 am
@High Seas,
P.S. This from today's news explains the malicious disinformation about Fukushima and Nevada storage spread by Jaczko; hope he's forced to resign:
Quote:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Gregory Jaczko wants his agency to decide within 90 days how to proceed with far-reaching safety changes recommended for the nuclear industry, including requiring plant owners to have greater levels of backup power and requiring possibly costly upgrades.

Up to now, a cost-protection rule has essentially barred the NRC from requiring major plant improvements without first having to prove that the human-health benefits justify the cost
.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303661904576452144090225456.html?mod=WSJ_hp_MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsSecond
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Jul, 2011 07:20 am
@High Seas,
Sorry I didn't realize the link was subscription-only; this is the rest of the article
Quote:
.... The panel also proposed essentially setting aside a 1988 rule that has protected the nuclear-power industry against costly upgrades. The industry has used the rule, which requires benefits to public safety to be balanced against industry costs, to beat back regulatory changes it didn't like.

Tony Pietrangelo, chief nuclear officer for the industry's Nuclear Energy Institute, said the proposal to set aside the cost-protection rule amounted to "sweeping change." The NRC "will have to think long and hard," he added, before embarking on such a "major policy shift.". . .

The cost-protection rule was created to shield the nuclear sector after its costs spiraled out of control because of the NRC's reaction to the 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island reactor in Pennsylvania. Billions of dollars of added costs were imposed on the nuclear-power sector, which the industry said stalled its growth for more than two decades.

The cost-protection rule adopted in 1988 has insulated the industry against major upgrades without proof that human health benefits exceeded those costs. In the calculation, a human life was valued at about $3 million. Critics say the rule undervalues human lives, noting that other federal agencies place a value on a human life of between $5 million and $9 million for the purpose of cost-benefit calculations in other areas
.

0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 18 Jul, 2011 01:07 pm
@High Seas,
Quote:
Where the fuel is is unknown to you only - it has melted and sits at the bottom reactor vessel - and it's not "going" anywhere:
that is the theory, the hope, in reality they dont know if they have fuel in the containment vessel.

Quote:
Robots have been inside all fuel pools since May;
I have seen no reports indicating this...do you have a link?
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2011 10:30 pm
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/08/12/1006409/-Nuking-Japanthe-Ugly-Truth?via=siderec

Cycloptichorn
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 03:43 pm
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/2011/fukushimareport01.html

Quote:
IAEA Fukushima Daiichi Status Report
Update of 2 November 2011

What are the recent developments at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant?

On 1 November, TEPCO detected the possible presence of xenon-133 and xenon-135 gases sampled from inside the Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2. The presence of these short-lived radionuclides indicates that some nuclear fission may have recently occurred. TEPCO reported that no increases in radiation levels have been observed. According to TEPCO "even if a fission reaction is assumed to be on-going, its scale is extremely small and the reactor is in a stable condition as a whole."

TEPCO responded to this development by injecting 10 tonnes of boric acid solution (water containing 480 kg of boric acid) into the reactor from 02:48 to 03:47 local time on 2 November. Boric acid solution is used as a countermeasure to nuclear fission for its ability to absorb neutrons.

On 31 October, 10 tons of fresh water was added to the Spent Fuel Pool at Unit 4.

On 27 October, a crack was discovered on the casing for the axle junction of the ceiling crane located in the Common Spent Fuel Pool Building. Under normal operating conditions, the ceiling crane is used to move nuclear fuel elements and other items.

On 28 October, TEPCO announced that the cover for Unit 1 is now considered fully operational and functional. (See photo: Roof Panel Installation, 14 October 2011). The cover has been placed over Unit 1 to reduce the dispersion of radionuclides to the environment.

TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant station reactors 1, 2 and 3 require circulating water to remove heat from their fuel.

Plant operators are working to bring the reactors into a "cold shutdown condition" defined by TEPCO and the Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters as:

Lowering the coolant water temperature to below 100 degrees centigrade while reducing the pressure inside the reactor vessels to the same as the outside air pressure, or 1 atmosphere (atm); and
Bringing release of radioactive materials from the primary containment vessel under control and reducing public radiation exposure by additional release (not to exceed 1 mSv/year at the site boundary as a target).

What is the latest status regarding workers at Fukushima Daiichi?

TEPCO regularly releases summaries of the radiation exposure (both internal and external) results of its workers. (The following Table contains the latest results of combined external and internal radiation exposures to workers at Fukushima Daiichi released by TEPCO on 31 October). The figures demonstrate a decrease in the level of exposure to onsite workers over time from March through September.

As of March 15, the effective radiation dose limit for radiation workers at Fukushima Daiichi was raised from 100 mSv to 250 mSv, provided that they are under emergency situations.

On 17 October, a TEPCO employee was working with water injection equipment on the second floor of the reactor building for Unit 1. When his work was completed, contamination was discovered around his mouth. However, a whole body counter measurement identified no internal contamination.

TEPCO had previously reported that 65 personnel (all sub-contractors) who worked at the Fukushima Plant during the initial response had not undergone whole body counting. Several have been identified since that time and an investigation to identify remaining personnel is on-going. At present there are 20 persons outstanding from this identification process. Nine of them have been identified as not being applicable for whole body counting, seven are still under investigation to obtain their contact details and four have been unable to be found through their provided contact information.





Additional graphs and technical details are at the link above.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 08:25 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 18 Jul, 2011 wrote:

High Seas wrote:
Where the fuel is is unknown to you only - it has melted and sits at the bottom reactor vessel - and it's not "going" anywhere:
that is the theory, the hope, in reality they dont know if they have fuel in the containment vessel.




Fears of Fission Rise at Stricken Japanese Plant

By HIROKO TABUCHI

Published: November 2, 2011

Quote:
A former nuclear engineer with three decades of experience at a major engineering firm, meanwhile, said that sustained re-criticality remained highly unlikely. But his main concern was that officials could not pinpoint the exact location of the nuclear fuel — which would greatly complicate the cleanup.

The engineer, who has worked at all three nuclear power complexes operated by Tokyo Electric, spoke on condition of anonymity because he did not want to be identified by his former employers. He said that tiny fuel pellets could have been carried to different parts of the plant, like the spaces under the reactor during attempts to vent them in the early days. That would explain several cases of lethally high radiation readings found outside the reactor cores.

If the fuel is still inside the reactor core, that’s one thing,” he said. But if the fuel has been dispersed more widely, then we are far from any stable shutdown.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/03/world/asia/bursts-of-fission-detected-at-fukushima-reactor-in-japan.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1&hp

Sometimes I just love being proven right....and here we are yet again with Hawkeye one point, critics who claim Hawkeye has no idea of what he is talking about 0 points !
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Nov, 2011 12:24 am
6.9 Mw - NORTHEAST OF TAIWAN
Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 6.9 Mw
Date-Time

8 Nov 2011 02:59:06 UTC
8 Nov 2011 11:59:06 near epicenter
7 Nov 2011 20:59:06 standard time in your timezone

Location 27.291N 125.867E
Depth 209 km
Distances

218 km (136 miles) NW (305 degrees) of Naha, Okinawa, Japan
362 km (225 miles) NNE (27 degrees) of Ishigaki-jima, Ryukyu Islands, Japan
497 km (309 miles) ENE (59 degrees) of T'AI-PEI, Taiwan
1140 km (708 miles) S (186 degrees) of SEOUL, South Korea
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Nov, 2011 11:37 am
@Cycloptichorn,
That nonsensical blog is kept by an elderly lady who clearly doesn't know microsieverts from millisieverts - read the damn comments to her nonsense! Why you and a couple of other alarmists here keep posting drivel from cartoonish sources is beyond my understanding. This at least is credible info:
http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/arxiv/27335/?ref=rss
http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/arxiv/files/76807/Fukushima.png
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 06:33 pm
@High Seas,
Quote:
The only reason I bother to address your apparently incurable ignorance is that this thread is read by many more people than those posting:

1. Where the fuel is is unknown to you only - it has melted and sits at the bottom reactor vessel - and it's not "going" anywhere


Quote:
TOKYO -- The stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant came a lot closer to a full "China Syndrome" meltdown than previous company analyses had indicated, though there is no danger of further damage now, plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said Wednesday.
The nuclear fuel rods in reactor No. 1 likely melted completely, TEPCO and the Japanese government said for the first time -- burning a hole through one surrounding vessel and eating through up to three-quarters of the concrete base at the bottom of a second containment vessel meant as a last barrier between the radioactive core and the outside world.
That brought the fuel closer than previously believed to breaching the containment vessel and continuing to burn through the ground below -- a catastrophic scenario sometimes described as the "China Syndrome," from the fanciful notion, popularized in a US film by the same name, that in a catastrophic meltdown, molten reactor fuel could sink through the earth until it reached China.
Earlier, TEPCO had said only that it thought unit No. 1's fuel was more than half melted, and that some had fallen into the containment vessel.
The findings are the latest reminder of how dangerous the mid-March accident at Fukushima Daiichi was and how much remains unknown. They result from separate TEPCO and government analyses of the latest data on radiation and temperature readings around the reactors, which has helped TEPCO get a better idea of where the fuel is at the three units whose cores partially melted down.
TEPCO said the damage in units No. 2 and No. 3 was less severe than in No. 1, although some fuel did burn through their surrounding vessels to the concrete base of their containment vessels. In all three units, the fuel has now cooled to below the critical temperature of 100 degrees Celsius (212 degrees Fahrenheit), and thus poses no further threat, officials said.


Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/international/fukushima_plant_was_close_to_full_jNzN61vNhkrtK6LLdnX12M#ixzz1fEquZsok


The blow-hard High Seas was wrong.....SHOCKING!
rosborne979
 
  3  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2011 10:01 am
@hawkeye10,
Obviously things don't "burn" through the the Earth and come out the other side... But just for fun, if you want to see what's really on the opposite side of the Earth just play with this Tunneling Tool: Smile

http://www.freemaptools.com/tunnel-to-other-side-of-the-earth.htm

Quote:
That brought the fuel closer than previously believed to breaching the containment vessel and continuing to burn through the ground below -- a catastrophic scenario sometimes described as the "China Syndrome," from the fanciful notion, popularized in a US film by the same name, that in a catastrophic meltdown, molten reactor fuel could sink through the earth until it reached China.

Back when the term "China Syndrome" came out it seems that most people expected nuclear power plants to be on the opposite side of the earth from China Smile But from a Japanese perspective it probably should have been called The Argentina Syndrome.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2011 10:09 am
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:

Obviously things don't "burn" through the the Earth and come out the other side...

Bothering to point out basic truths to congenital fools is a waste of time - though I admit having tried to do it myself a few times with that particular fool and a couple of others. I've ended up putting him on ignore, where he can safely keep blabbing about things he obviously knows nothing about - why stop him? Smile
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2011 10:18 am
@High Seas,
wow, is there a core meltdown? Into the groundwater? gonna be a lot of really dirty steam if thats the case.

I did not hear about this.

Everybody knows that the fuel melting through the core of the earth will come out in San Diego .
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2011 10:25 am
@farmerman,
You were following the isotopes all along - hey, you're the one who explained the more exotic ones to the rest of us on this thread (unless it was George OB). It's been known for months there had been a core meltdown; and also that very recently some fuel had re-ignited. It can re-ignite spontaneously, right?
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2011 10:32 am
@High Seas,
I just thought the "Tunneling" tool was kinda fun. Smile
 

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