52
   

WikiLeaks about to hit the fan

 
 
JPB
 
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 05:02 pm
Quote:
LONDON — U.S. allies around the world have been briefed by American diplomats about an expected release of classified U.S. files by the WikiLeaks website that is likely to cause international embarrassment and could damage some nations' relations with the United States. The next release is expected to include thousands of diplomatic cables reporting corruption allegations against politicians in Russia, Afghanistan and other Central Asian nations, sources familiar with the State Department cables held by WikiLeaks told Reuters on Wednesday.

According to the London-based daily al-Hayat, the WikiLeaks release includes documents that show Turkey has helped al-Qaida in Iraq — and that the United States has supported the PKK, a Kurdish rebel organization that has been waging a separatist war against Turkey since 1984, the Washington Post reported.

The U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv warned the Israeli foreign ministry that some of the cables could concern U.S.-Israel relations, the Israeli daily newspaper Haaretz reported, citing a senior Israeli official.

'Hurt Italy's image'
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's government in Italy vowed on Friday to defend the country's reputation and interests from what it said was a scheme designed "to hurt Italy's image on the international stage."

A government statement cited global media coverage of a number of high profile stories in recent days as "symptoms of a strategy" to damage Italy's international standing.

They included a probe involving defense group Finmeccanica, pictures of heaps of uncollected garbage in Naples and crumbling archaeological ruins in the ancient city of Pompeii but also the planned release of U.S. classified files by WikiLeaks.

...

'Harmful to the U.S.'
The Obama administration said earlier this week that it had alerted Congress and begun notifying foreign governments that the whistle-blowing website is preparing to release a huge cache of diplomatic cables whose publication could give a behind-the-scenes look at American diplomacy around the world.

"These revelations are harmful to the United States and our interests," U.S. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said.

"They are going to create tension in relationships between our diplomats and our friends around the world," he added.Source


I can only imagine...
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Type: Discussion • Score: 52 • Views: 156,781 • Replies: 4,074

 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 05:07 pm
@JPB,
- and the truth shall set you free.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 05:50 pm
@JPB,
We need a wikileaks in ALL countries.
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 06:10 pm
Oops. This could get ugly. I don't think I agree with Wikileaks. There should be candor amongst technocrats in various countries, believing that their conversations won't be taken, perhaps, out of context. But...
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 08:28 pm
@realjohnboy,
I don't know what I think about it, rjb. I didn't pay enough attention to the recent press to form an opinion. Sounds like it could get ugly, indeed. But, then, I'm not convinced that's a bad thing. Dunno -- waiting to see what unfolds.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 08:42 pm
How come there's never any mention of those American heroes/patriots that are attempting to expose the scum. Tear down that tarnished, blood stained old Vietnam wall and put up statutes to these brave young fellas.
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 09:05 pm
@JTT,
I'm sure this bit shocks you, JTT. The more things change...

Quote:
According to the London-based daily al-Hayat, the WikiLeaks release includes documents that show Turkey has helped al-Qaida in Iraq — and that the United States has supported the PKK, a Kurdish rebel organization that has been waging a separatist war against Turkey since 1984, the Washington Post reported.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2010 10:26 pm
@JPB,
There's really nothing that shocks me anymore, JPB. I'm long past the stage of thinking that the USA does anything for altruistic reasons.

But that would be fair enough in and of itself if it wasn't for the tremendous brutality, the absolute disregard for life and the welfare and happiness of others.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 12:26 pm
Quote:
WASHINGTON — The online website WikiLeaks says it will go ahead with the release of hundreds of thousands of classified State Department documents in defiance of U.S. demands not to publish the files.

The WikiLeaks website appeared to be inaccessible, and WikiLeaks said in its Twitter feed that it was experiencing a denial of service attack. Nevertheless, WikiLeaks said that publications in the U.S. and Europe would print the leaked diplomatic cables even if it could not. Source


a denial of service attack?
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 12:50 pm
@JPB,
I don't know what the "Denial of Service" thing is about. Some 5 newspapers around the world have the stuff from WikiLeaks.
I got an email from the NY Times a half an hour ago with this sentence:
"A cache of a quarter-million confidential American diplomatic cables, most of them from the past three years, provides an unprecedented look at backroom bargaining by embassies around the world, brutally candid views of foreign leaders and frank assessments of nuclear and terrorist threats."
The "candid views of foreign leaders" could prove to be the most troublesome for the U.S.
Again, I am not a fan of stuff like this being made public. I love sausage but don't want to see it being produced.
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 12:54 pm
@JPB,
the early spin on it here is a real grit and grimace

JPB wrote:

Quote:
LONDON — U.S. allies around the world have been briefed by American diplomats about an expected release of classified U.S. files by the WikiLeaks website that is likely to cause international embarrassment and could damage some nations' relations with the United States.




I think the U.S. relationships are the ones about to be damaged from what I'm hearing.

I suspect it's gonna be ugly. Hard to imagine any good coming out of it.

JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 12:58 pm
@realjohnboy,
The NYT has released some summaries.
Quote:
The 251,287 cables, first acquired by WikiLeaks, were provided to The Times by an intermediary on the condition of anonymity. Many are unclassified, and none are marked “top secret,” the government’s most secure communications status. But some 11,000 are classified “secret,” 9,000 are labeled “noforn,” shorthand for material considered too delicate to be shared with any foreign government, and 4,000 are designated both secret and noforn.

Many more cables name diplomats’ confidential sources, from foreign legislators and military officers to human rights activists and journalists, often with a warning to Washington: “Please protect” or “Strictly protect.”

The Times has withheld from articles and removed from documents it is posting online the names of some people who spoke privately to diplomats and might be at risk if they were publicly identified. The Times is also withholding some passages or entire cables whose disclosure could compromise American intelligence efforts.
More
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 01:00 pm
@ehBeth,
Yeah, that's my impression too. Interesting in a voyeur kind of way, telling in some regards, not too many surprises from what I've seen so far (link at the previous post).

edit: one snippet from the link...

Quote:
Even when they recount events that are already known, the cables offer remarkable details.

For instance, it has been previously reported that the Yemeni government has sought to cover up the American role in missile strikes against the local branch of Al Qaeda. But a cable’s fly-on-the-wall account of a January meeting between the Yemeni president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, and Gen. David H. Petraeus, then the American commander in the Middle East, is nonetheless breathtaking.

“We’ll continue saying the bombs are ours, not yours,” Mr. Saleh said, according to the cable sent by the American ambassador, prompting Yemen’s deputy prime minister to “joke that he had just ‘lied’ by telling Parliament” that Yemeni forces had carried out the strikes.

Mr. Saleh, who at other times resisted American counterterrorism requests, was in a lighthearted mood. The authoritarian ruler of a conservative Muslim country, Mr. Saleh complains of smuggling from nearby Djibouti, but tells General Petraeus that his concerns are drugs and weapons, not whiskey, “provided it’s good whiskey.”
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 01:07 pm
The article agrees with my "voyeuristic" appeal of the cache.

Quote:
The voluminous traffic of more recent years — well over half of the quarter-million cables date from 2007 or later — show American officials struggling with events whose outcomes are far from sure. To read through them is to become a global voyeur, immersed in the jawboning, inducements and penalties the United States wields in trying to have its way with a recalcitrant world.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 01:37 pm
@realjohnboy,
Quote:
Again, I am not a fan of stuff like this being made public. I love sausage but don't want to see it being produced.


Nothing like showing us the real realjohnboy. The innocents of the world are just so much sausage, there to be ground into nothingness to feed the rapacious greed of the USA.

Exactly what is it that you would find disturbing about exposing felons and war criminals and their terrible misdeeds?
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 01:44 pm
The Guardian (UK) reports that the WikiLeaks information paints a poor portrait of current Prime Minister David Cameron and former PM Gordon Brown, describing them as "not very highly regarded" by folks in Washington.
I am not sure what "not very highly regarded" means. It could be as extreme as (an expression we use here in the South): "Dumb as dog-****."
We will see.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 01:48 pm
@realjohnboy,
Quote:
I am not sure what "not very highly regarded" means.


That's Washington talk for "won't do exactly as we say".
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 01:57 pm
I'm following all this, at least somewhat. I started out rather liking wikileaks and Assange; now am sorry about the potential harm to people who have worked with the US, the naming of names. I understand RJB's qualm re the effects on candor too. But I'm still more for Assange than against him.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 02:01 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
now am sorry about the potential harm to people who have worked with the US, the naming of names. I understand RJB's qualm re the effects on candor too.


If you mix it up with war criminals/felons you just gotta take the consequences, Osso. Why on earth would you think it should be any other way?
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 02:04 pm
@JTT,
I don't mix it up with war criminals.
 

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