8
   

Who's arming Mexican cartels? Maybe your NRA neighbor

 
 
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 09:53 am
I've always believed that the NRA's phony reason for protecting constitutional gun rights is a cover for their gun sale profits. ---BBB

November 18, 2010
Who's arming Mexican cartels? Maybe your neighbor
By Tim Johnson | McClatchy Newspapers

MEXICO CITY — When a former Oklahoma Narcotics Bureau agent, Frank Reyes, pleaded guilty not long ago to running guns, it opened a window on the way Mexican drug cartels fill their arsenals.

The Americans buying guns for Mexican gangsters as part of Reyes' ring are a gamut of college students, jobless men, gun show employees, city workers — in short, the guy next door.

The "iron river of guns," as the flow of assault rifles into Mexico has been called, is an irritant in U.S.-Mexican relations.

In Mexico, it's illegal to buy most types of weapons. Drug cartels, with their long tentacles into the United States, use their U.S. networks to snap up assault rifles and other weapons from gun shops and shows and bring them back over the border.

What to do about it is a source of friction within the U.S. government. Earlier this month, the inspector general's office within the Justice Department issued a report that was critical of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives for failing to slow the flow of illegal weapons to Mexico.

"We found that ATF does not systematically and consistently exchange intelligence with its Mexican and some U.S. partner agencies," the Nov. 9 report says.

While the ATF clearly has shortcomings, it chalked up a success in breaking apart a ring led by Reyes, a stocky 5-foot-8 former state narcotics agent living in a high-rise apartment building in Oklahoma City near the memorial to the 1995 terrorist bombing of the Murrah Federal Building, which killed 168 people.

Earlier in the year, ATF agents in Texas had intercepted vehicles carrying 28 assault rifles bound for Mexico, and as they traced the serial numbers and purchase sites of the rifles the paper trail led to Oklahoma City and 29-year-old Reyes.

According to an affidavit by ATF agent Michael D. Randall, federal officers began interviewing the "straw buyers" — or front-end buyers — of the weapons, who were listed on the Firearms Transaction Record, which gun shop owners are required to obtain upon sale.

The purchaser of some of the weapons was a 25-year-old student, Jorge Blanco, who lived in Stillwater, home of Oklahoma State University. Blanco was a joint owner with Reyes of Kiko's Hookah Lounge, a local bar. Blanco told ATF agents that Reyes sent him out four times in April to buy AK-47s and Chinese-made SKS assault rifles.

Other buyers for Reyes included a man he met at a coin laundry, a Stillwater city employee, a police officer of the Absentee Shawnee tribe and numerous others.

"Reyes is always looking for assault rifles and even .50-caliber rifles," the police officer, Josh Bufford, who later collaborated with the investigation, told the ATF.

One morning in June, ATF agents watched as Reyes spent $11,000 to buy a Barrett .50-caliber sniper rifle and a Century semi-automatic assault rifle. Unbeknown to Reyes, the gun shop owner was cooperating with the feds, and an electronic tracking device was inserted in the package.

Reyes lifted the gun case into his 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe and headed south down Interstate 35 into Texas, eventually transferring the weapons to a driver in a black BMW convertible. Reyes headed home, but the weapons went south.

Six days later, the ATF alerted Texas law enforcement to stop a two-vehicle caravan near the Eagle Pass border crossing. One of the vehicles, a Ford Explorer, contained the Barrett sniper rifle and 13 assault rifles. An accompanying Saturn contained 30 assault rifles.

On Sept. 29, Reyes pleaded guilt to one count of conspiracy and one count of transferring firearms. He's to be sentenced in December or January.

It isn't publicly known for whom Reyes worked in Mexico. It is known that smuggled guns are used in horrendous crimes. Federal agents seized 336 firearms from a Houston smuggling ring in 2006-07, and tracked the weapons to 57 deaths, including those of 18 Mexican law enforcement officers, the Nov. 9 inspector general's report says.

Prosecuting weapons smuggling rings isn't easy. While prosecutors can apply any of 75 statutes, such as conspiracy, against gun smugglers, there's no single law against firearms trafficking, the report says.

Moreover, U.S. gun shops aren't required to report to the ATF when they sell several assault weapons of the sort cartels prefer in a single purchase, it says, recommending that the bureau redress that issue.

Arturo Sarukhan, the Mexican ambassador to Washington, appealed Nov. 10 to the National Rifle Association to recognize how current laws "pose a significant threat to Mexico's security." He urged the powerful gun lobby to help legislators enact tougher regulations.

"This would be a win-win for the NRA," Sarukhan said in New York. "They ensure they are not being criticized for . . . either complicity, overtly or covertly allowing guns to go into the hands of drug traffickers who then cross them over the border into Mexico."

The NRA dismissed any need for tougher gun laws, and said U.S. gun shops and shows weren't used to stock cartel arsenals.

"These are multi-billion-dollar business operations. They are not getting their guns one piece at a time at gun shows in the United States," spokesman Andrew Arulanandam said.

He said U.S. legislators should take no role "to combat this tragic problem. Simply, this is a Mexican problem."


Read more: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/11/18/104009/whos-arming-mexican-cartels-maybe.html#ixzz15kCDOv6F
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:04 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Yet another reason to legalize drugs.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:19 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
BumbleBeeBoogie wrote:
I've always believed that the NRA's phony reason for protecting constitutional gun rights
is a cover for their gun sale profits. ---BBB

O, yeah!

I 've made Trillion$ and Trillion$ of $$$$$ on my gun sales.

Personal survival of predatory violence has NO value; only money has value.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:34 pm

Selling guns is not different in principle
from selling carpenters' tools

except that CARPENTERS have NO Constitutional right to possess their tools
without government interference, protected by the Bill of Rights.



David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:38 pm

The IMPORTANT thing
is that BBB's side LOST the jurisprudential war against the right to survive predatory violence.

MY side, the pro-FREEDOM side, won!

Liberalism was defeated.





David
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:39 pm
It does not matter who is selling to the cartels, they have plenty of money to spend, if they wants guns someone will sell guns to them.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:41 pm
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:
Yet another reason to legalize drugs.
YES! Very good point. The war on drugs is deeply unAmerican.





David
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:45 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
It does not matter who is selling to the cartels,
they have plenty of money to spend, if they wants guns someone will sell guns to them.
OF COURSE; u 'd think that everyone, even BBB woud be able to see that clearly.

Maybe BBB thinks that if the US stopped any American gun sales
to the Mexicans, then gun runners of other nationalities
woud BOYCOTT the Mexicans.





David
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:50 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
YES! Very good point. The war on drugs is deeply unAmerican.

Exactly...we used to pride ourselves on coming up with practical solutions to real problems that worked....what ever happened to that?
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 02:58 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
Maybe BBB thinks that if the US stopped any American gun sales
to the Mexicans, then gun runners of other nationalities
woud BOYCOTT the Mexicans.


Like that has worked so well in the past when America has tried it...The Drug lord armies would be no less dangerous if they were sporting AK-47 knock-off, or even perhaps the real thing.
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 03:06 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
Quote:
YES! Very good point. The war on drugs is deeply unAmerican.

Exactly...we used to pride ourselves on coming up with practical solutions to real problems that worked....what ever happened to that?
I can go into my backyard and pick up a handfull of America and swallow it, if I wanna, because its mine.

I don't because its effects 'd be deleterious.

Its a question of KNOWLEDGE.

The MOST fundamental consideration is that:
government has NO jurisdiction to stop us from SELF-destructive conduct.

Governments simply ASSUME that thay have such jurisdiction
and proceed by USURPATION.


I very intensely wish that the Founders had the presence of mind
to install very, very severe and harsh penalities for any officer of government
who interferes with a citizen who is harming himself
(except that he can speak freely).

The right to self-destructive conduct shoud be Constitutionally defended
(as long as no one else is harmed in the act; e.g., use of dynamite).




David
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 03:09 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
Maybe BBB thinks that if the US stopped any American gun sales
to the Mexicans, then gun runners of other nationalities
woud BOYCOTT the Mexicans.


Like that has worked so well in the past when America has tried it...The Drug lord armies would be no less dangerous if they were sporting AK-47 knock-off, or even perhaps the real thing.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 03:10 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
government has NO jurisdiction to stop us from SELF-destructive conduct.

It has jurisdiction to encourage behaviour that is desired by the majority re vices, but should tread very softly on criminalizing vices, it part because the law is poorly suited for the task or regulating vices, and in part because America was set up to be the land of the free, not the well behaved.
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 03:14 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
government has NO jurisdiction to stop us from SELF-destructive conduct.

It has jurisdiction to encourage behaviour that is desired by the majority re vices,
I challenge u and dispute u.
Please quote me where this jd is CONFERRED ?????

WHERE is jd conferred to encourage behavior ????????





David
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 03:23 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
I challenge u and dispute u.
Please quote me where this jd is CONFERRED ?????
Because even after widespread use of the power to levy taxes was used by England to promote behavior it liked we Americans did not see fit to write into the Constitution regulations on where our government could tax us.
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:37 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
I challenge u and dispute u.
Please quote me where this jd is CONFERRED ?????
hawkeye10 wrote:
Because even after widespread use of the power to levy taxes was used by England to promote behavior it liked we Americans did not see fit to write into the Constitution regulations on where our government could tax us.
9th n 10th Amendments
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:45 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
9th n 10th Amendments
I am not a Constitutional scholar, but I don't believe either Amendment limits the ability of government to tax vices.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:54 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Quote:
I've always believed that the NRA's phony reason for protecting constitutional gun rights is a cover for their gun sale profits.
that's just as stupid as saying
Quote:
the Teamsters Union is financing the communists over-throw of the US government
InfraBlue
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:01 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

hawkeye10 wrote:
It does not matter who is selling to the cartels,
they have plenty of money to spend, if they wants guns someone will sell guns to them.
OF COURSE; u 'd think that everyone, even BBB woud be able to see that clearly.

Maybe BBB thinks that if the US stopped any American gun sales
to the Mexicans, then gun runners of other nationalities
woud BOYCOTT the Mexicans.



David

So let the cartels get their weapons from some other place, unless you two support the arming of the cartels by the US which is fighting a proxy war against them.
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:14 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Americans have a constitutional right to buy weapons and sell them to criminals?

Who knew?
 

Related Topics

The Ultimate Crack Down: We Know Not What We Do - Discussion by BumbleBeeBoogie
Y The War on Drugs is UnAmerican - Discussion by OmSigDAVID
Piracy - Discussion by JLO1988
Why We Need Heroin[e] - Discussion by JLO1988
War on Drugs will change course in 2013 - Discussion by BumbleBeeBoogie
The War Against Drugs Marches On . . . . - Discussion by OmSigDAVID
The war on drugs is increasing drug use and crime - Discussion by BumbleBeeBoogie
The Drug War vs the Bill of Rights - Discussion by gungasnake
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Who's arming Mexican cartels? Maybe your NRA neighbor
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 06/16/2021 at 05:29:04