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Was Arizona's immigration law prompted by private prisons?

 
 
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:38 am
I always thought the owners of the private prisons were behind Arizona's new immigration law. Arizona's governor and state Sen. Russell Pearce got behind the financial goals of Corrections Corporation of America, which operates private prisons in 19 states. I think the private prisons are one of the worst actions taken by the justice system. ---BBB

November 18, 2010
Commentary: Was Arizona's immigration law prompted by private prisons?
By Fred Grimm | The Miami Herald

Arizona's get-tough immigration law was couched as a burst of desert populism, as if the frustrations of local citizens over so many illegals crossing the Mexican border had been translated, word for word, into Senate Bill 1070.

The notion of requiring state and local policemen to lock up suspects who have no proof they entered the country legally also fit nicely with the tea party insurgency erupting across the country.

Politicians in at least a dozen other states, including Florida's Gov.-elect Rick Scott and U.S. Sen.-elect Marco Rubio, have talked of emulating Arizona's rebellion. ``Let's get to work, and bring the Arizona law to Florida now,'' Scott said during his gubernatorial campaign.

Something else lurks behind this spontaneous desert populism. Something not so very spontaneous.

A National Public Radio investigation has traced the origins of SB 1070 to a template contrived at a December meeting in Washington, D.C., by the American Legislative Exchange Council, a corporate-sponsored ``information'' gathering that most of us would mistake as a plush junket for state lawmakers, financed by corporate lobbyists.

NPR found that one of ALEC's corporate sponsors, Corrections Corporation of America, which operates private prisons in 19 states, was particularly interested in pushing the get-tough immigration legislation.

CCA, according to the company's own reports, projects ``a significant portion of our revenues'' coming from locking up illegal immigrants. With national crime rates down and prison populations shrinking, illegal immigration has become a crucial segment for the private prison industry.

By the way, Arizona , anti-immigration folk hero and chief sponsor of SB 1070, attended the December meeting of ALEC and went home with model legislation for an immigration crackdown.

The private prison industry already has plenty of lobbying muscle in Florida. In 2008, House Speaker Ray Sansom (since disgraced, arrested and ousted) inserted $113 million into the budget for a 2,000-bed private prison along the Blackwater River in Milton, despite the state's financial crisis.

Except when the Blackwater River prison was finished the Department of Corrections didn't have the excess prisoners to fill it up. The new prison sat empty.

Lobbyists went to work. Legislation passed last spring required the Department of Corrections to move 2,224 inmates into the 2,000-bed facility (making it even more profitable) and to guarantee GEO Group of Boca Raton that Blackwater would stay at least 90 percent full.

Private prisons, our legislators claim (even as GEO poured $236,000 into state political campaigns this year) save taxpayers money. But a study by the Florida Center for Fiscal and Economic Policy released in April discovered ``simply no data to suggest that's true,'' study author John Hall told me Monday.

Private prisons, he said, can claim lower per-prisoner costs because they supervise a less-dangerous, less-troublesome, less-expensive class of prisoners.

Hall also raised doubts about rehabilitation efforts in private prisons.

``The private prison industry has no incentive to reduce crime. Only to lock up more prisoners,'' he said.

Under that business plan, Florida's considerable population of undocumented immigrants, no rehab required, must look like a mighty cash crop -- ready for harvest.


Read more: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/11/18/103803/commentary-was-arizonas-immigration.html?storylink=MI_emailed#ixzz15ejnndlF
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 987 • Replies: 17
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BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:42 am
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Should private prisons be banded? If not, should they be more regulated?

BBB
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:44 am
I don't care if they are private, but they should be non-profit companies instead of the monstrosities we see today.

Cycloptichorn
Francis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:57 am
BBB wrote:
Should private prisons be banded?

Depends on the injury..
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 12:21 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Back during the last great depression, the state loaded up train loads of Mexican miners and sent to Mexico... Too bad so many of them were U.S. citizens... Consider the place and the sort of people they have sent to represent them in government... It was a woman on the Supreme Court from Arizona who gave the election to G.W.Bush... What was their say in the matter??? Was it not a state issue???
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 12:25 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

I don't care if they are private, but they should be non-profit companies instead of the monstrosities we see today.

Cycloptichorn

Profit can be turned into non profit in such a way that the cost is just as high, or higher... No one should profit from human misery, or human misery will never end...
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 12:58 pm
Private prison automatically says Jim Crow to me.

I'm glad you posted this as it contradicts all those things the right is saying about freedom.

Will we as a nation recover from the damage the right is doing?
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 01:34 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Private prison automatically says Jim Crow to me.

I'm glad you posted this as it contradicts all those things the right is saying about freedom.

Will we as a nation recover from the damage the right is doing?

You do not make one part of the population free by throwing the rest in prison... The ones ourside looking in are as much prisoners as the ones inside and looking out...
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 02:02 pm
I've been wondering if the private prisons are partially responsible for the blocking of changes to some of our laws that would reduce the numbers of inmates---and their profits? Ending drug Prohibition? Ending the war on drugs, for example? Allowing weed to be legal? Prostitution? Selling drugs? Cartel wars and the murders?

BBB
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 03:26 pm
@Fido,
Wow! What a non sequitur.
Fido
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:09 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Wow! What a non sequitur.
You may not be following, but I think most people take long sentences, and the ease at which people are tossed into prison as a real threat to their freedom... And, I think that is the object... They punish the guilty far beyond the damage of the crime... What point would that injustice serve, but to keep the honest honest, thinking to avoid a similar injustice against themselves... It is coercive...
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:12 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
BumbleBeeBoogie wrote:

I've been wondering if the private prisons are partially responsible for the blocking of changes to some of our laws that would reduce the numbers of inmates---and their profits? Ending drug Prohibition? Ending the war on drugs, for example? Allowing weed to be legal? Prostitution? Selling drugs? Cartel wars and the murders?

BBB
You might remember that profit prisons played a large part in our history, particularly that period T. Roosevelt called Muckraking... The abuses were extreme...
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 11:14 pm
@Fido,
You obviously know nothing about American history to give me the rubbish you have about long sentences. Read Douglas Blackmon's book, Slavery By Another Name, then respond to my post.
Fido
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Nov, 2010 03:59 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

You obviously know nothing about American history to give me the rubbish you have about long sentences. Read Douglas Blackmon's book, Slavery By Another Name, then respond to my post.


I have got a library you would not believe, and if you count the books in the upstairs john, I have about seven books going right now in various stages of completion... I would not mind reading your book; and far from it... I love learning, and reading; but you can do me a favor, and give a synopsis, or at least draw some comclusions from the book as you take them... Use his argument, but don't try to use the excuse that I have not read that book as an argument... I have read other books, and better on the subject of law... And I have one kid who is an attorney...

I will be happy to explain my position, and this simple statement: That law does not add to peace, or lead to justice; and the willingness we show to use long sentences to teach by example is unjust, does not work, and taxes us most severely... It works to deny the honorable their rights to the just conclusion of their thoughts, that only violence and revolution will change their condition... For those who actually engage in crime; extreme sentences make them more violent, and less willing to give up to the authorities... Why should any free person submit to brutality and fear with any sort of power to resist... Trust me on this, that violence and law has often been used against working people in the pursuit of their rights, and this fact is not lost on any one in organized labor... They feel constrained in the free exercise of their rights, as we all must...
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Nov, 2010 06:09 pm
@Fido,
You position makes sense to you only and your wasting your breath. You really do not understand the concept of non sequitur.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Nov, 2010 07:12 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

You position makes sense to you only and your wasting your breath. You really do not understand the concept of non sequitur.
As certain as law follows justice as justice never follows law, I know what Non Sequitur means, though it is hardly a concept you fool... The notion of logic is a concept, but one that is only as good as the knowledge one brings, or the mind one processes it with... Good luck.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Nov, 2010 09:43 pm
@Fido,
Since I can't tell you to shut up, I will tell you to take your fingers off the keys. Your comments never matched a single thing I posted and you probably derailed this thread.
Fido
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Nov, 2010 10:09 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Since I can't tell you to shut up, I will tell you to take your fingers off the keys. Your comments never matched a single thing I posted and you probably derailed this thread.

What on earth about private prisons might prompt an immigration law??? If the people are finally beginning to discover the true cost of illegal immigration, which they have never really supported except against their will, why would they wish to add to that cost with prison??? Sure; some people in Arizona live in constant fear of the immigrants, and they know they cannot leave home without a lock on every single thing of value; but wanting people gone is not the same as wanting to bear a great additional burden of cost to house and feed such people..
0 Replies
 
 

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