10
   

What techniques or tricks do you use to remember forgotten names, titles, words, and concepts?

 
 
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 10:10 am
This morning I was trying to remember a particular word so I could praise Chai's wedding as an act of ... not austerity or frugalness ... something in the vein of those concepts on my McWedding thread. An a word similar to these concepts but more a positive line with conservation. Looking in a dictionary didn't help.

So what techniques do you use to force yourself to remember forgotten concepts, exact words, names, or titles to movies and books, etc...?

Unfortunately, I just remembered the word (mere seconds ago as it popped into my noggin) ... or at least the title of the documentary, Affluenza, [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0475060/combined], and thankfully I didn't use it because though the documentary was about the positive aspects of curbing rampant consumerism as well as the reasons for conservation and recycling, the title itself holds a completely opposite meaning that intended in the original post reply.

Quote:
affluenza (ˌæflʊˈɛnzə)

— n
Also called: sudden-wealth syndrome the guilt or lack of motivation experienced by people who have made or inherited large amounts of money

[C20: from aff ( luent ) + ( in ) fluenza ]



Anyway? Do you have any memory recall techniques to jog these forgotten words to the front of your verbal awareness?
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 10:37 am
i sing the name game song


luckily i don't know anyone named chuck Embarrassed
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 01:06 pm
@djjd62,
What is the game song?

I start going through the alphabet.

The older I get, the more slowly do words pop into my brain when I'm trying to remember a word. I can describe the word but not the word itself. I also find that my spelling is getting worse. I wonder why that happens.

BBB
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 01:18 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Name_Game
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 02:17 pm
@djjd62,
Thanks.

Fifty years ago, for some reason I never understood, I never could remember the last name of two of my friends when I introduced them. Their last name was Foldarola. I finally found a way to recall their name by saying to my self, Foldaroller stroller, a famous child's stroller at that time.

As I was typing this, it took about five minutes for the Foldaroller stroller to pop into my brain and I could still recall my friend's last name.

BBB
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 02:20 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Association games helps with names but since one can't create these associations with every new word and concept it can only work with the names of people you feel you need to memorize just after you meet them and make that kind of connection with.
0 Replies
 
MonaLeeza
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 03:17 pm
@tsarstepan,
I've started writing things down in notebooks. Just the act of writing it down helps me remember.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 03:18 pm
@tsarstepan,
I go thru the Alphabeth.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 03:33 pm
@MonaLeeza,
MonaLeeza wrote:

I've started writing things down in notebooks. Just the act of writing it down helps me remember.

I guess I'm going to have to do that. Writing stuff down helps me remember stuff later on. Had to do that with my own phone number when I got my last new cell phone.
MonaLeeza
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 05:06 pm
@tsarstepan,
Quote:

I guess I'm going to have to do that. Writing stuff down helps me remember stuff later on. Had to do that with my own phone number when I got my last new cell phone.


Of course it doesn't help at all when I'm in the shower and I can't remember whether I've already shampooed my hair or not....
PUNKEY
 
  3  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 05:36 pm
Forgetfulness - Billy Collins

The name of the author is the first to go
followed obediently by the title, the plot,
the heartbreaking conclusion, the entire novel
which suddenly becomes one you have never read,
never even heard of,

as if, one by one, the memories you used to harbor
decided to retire to the southern hemisphere of the brain,
to a little fishing village where there are no phones.

Long ago you kissed the names of the nine Muses goodbye
and watched the quadratic equation pack its bag,
and even now as you memorize the order of the planets,

something else is slipping away, a state flower perhaps,
the address of an uncle, the capital of Paraguay.

Whatever it is you are struggling to remember,
it is not poised on the tip of your tongue,
not even lurking in some obscure corner of your spleen.

It has floated away down a dark mythological river
whose name begins with an L as far as you can recall,
well on your own way to oblivion where you will join those
who have even forgotten how to swim and how to ride a bicycle.

No wonder you rise in the middle of the night
to look up the date of a famous battle in a book on war.
No wonder the moon in the window seems to have drifted
out of a love poem that you used to know by heart.



0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2010 08:16 pm
@MonaLeeza,
Here might be an idea to fix that from happening again. When you enter the shower, have the shampoo bottle face one way (front of the bottle towards the wall). If and when you shampoo, then turn the bottle facing the other way around.

So if you then realize in the fog of waking up in the morning the you just might realize whether you have or have not shampooed your hair by how the bottle is positioned.

Besides one shouldn't wash one's hair every day anyhow. Takes too much of ones natural oils out of one's hair and scalp. That's a bad thing. Skip washing your hair to every other day.
0 Replies
 
NoOne phil
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 11:40 am
@tsarstepan,
I simply forget. My wallet gets a lot of usage, it has my id so that I know what to call myself. If I went by what others called me, well, . . . . I would probably never get to cash my check.
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 03:44 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
BumbleBeeBoogie wrote:
... The older I get, the more slowly do words pop into my brain when I'm trying to remember a word. ...

Actually, this thread comes at a good time for me.

My mother is 84 and I've found that over the past year, she seems to be increasingly struggling to find the "right words" to say something, gets confused easier, and also remembering things seems to be tougher.

She frequently fills in "non-words", like saying 'this and that', in a sentence, and, in the end, I sometimes find that I don't have a lot of idea what she's talking about.

I've stressed for her to keep a pad of paper and pen handy on her kitchen table, to aid in remembering. I'm also wondering if a personal recording device would help.

Does anyone have any ideas that I could share with my mom?
MonaLeeza
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 04:17 pm
@Reyn,
Has she been put on any new medication in the past year? My uncle was in a nursing home supposedly suffering quite severe dementia. Someone reviewed and changed his medication and now he's mentally fine again and living semi-independently with hs son's family. I don't know how often that happens but it's scary to think that it happens at all.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 04:51 pm
@MonaLeeza,
I was going to suggest this too. Something similar happened with BBB. Her memory loss and difficulty recalling words for things in her everyday speech got worse while on all the various medications for her blood clots and joint pains. As soon as she was taken off of most of them it improved. She is also getting better, more restorative sleep that has helped to heal her memory difficulties.

Some of the memory loss and word difficulty is still there but it has improved quite a bit. Her regular efforts to try to post here on A2K are helping to exercise her brain and keep her brain active.

A book you may want to get is The 36-Hour Day. It was recommended to me by BBB's doctor and has helped me a great deal with tips to help her help herself as well as coping mechanisms for me as the caregiver. On Amazon, it has 110 reviews, 98 of which are 5 stars.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 05:22 pm
@Butrflynet,
I typed out a few notable excerpts from the book that may help:

Quote:
Other things also affect behavior [dementia patient]. When a person is not feeling well, he will be less able to think...illness, pain, and medication can make a person's thinking -- and behavior -- worse.

When you speak to a person, he must hear you: the first step in the process of communication is sensory input. The ability to repeat immediately what is heard may be retained but the next step, to remember what was said, at least temporarily, is often lost in people with dementia. If the person cannot temporarily recall what you said, he cannot respond. Often a person can recall only part of what was said and will act on only that part...As well as retaining what was heard, the person must comprehend what the words mean and evaluate what was daid. Many things go wrong in this process and may result in a reply that seems inappropriate to you. The person will act on what he thinks he heard. But he can act on only what his ears heard, his brain registered, his mental dictionary understood, and his mind processed. If his brain scrambles the message, he will respond in a way that is appropriate to what he understood...

The final step in communication is the person's answer. Things can go wrong here too. What comes out may not be what the confused person intended. This can sound like an intentional evasion, insult or foolish answer...

When people with dementia say or do things that don't make sense or that seem nasty or deliberate, it is almost certainly the brain damage at work. The person you are caring for is also often miserable and doing the best he can. In the rest of this book we show you how many ways you can help.

...

The success of memory aids depends on the severity of the dementia. A person with a mild dementia may devise reminders for himself, while a severely impaired person will only become more frustrated by his inability to use the aid. Written noted and reminders may help people who have a mild dementia. It is often helpful to put a simple list of the day's activities where the person can easily see it. A regular daily routine is much less confusing than frequent changes.

Leave familiar objects (pictures, magazines, television, radio) in their usual places where the person can see them easily. Some families have found that putting labels on things helps. Labeling drawers, "Mary's socks, Mary's nightgowns" may help.

...

Most individuals with mild cognitive impairment are aware of their difficulties. Many find it beneficial to express their frustrations, but continued focus on their memory problems can make it even harder for them to remember. Encouraging the use of a memory pad as well as avoidance of situations in which pressure to remember is high can help the person function better. The person may try using "to do" lists or making a list of reminder notes. Keeping the person's living area neat helps to avoid losing things. Routines help some people.

Make sure that medical problems are treated as well as possible and that medications that can impair memory are eliminated or minimized. Keeping medications in a weekly pill container reduces the risk of forgetting them or taking a dose twice.
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 08:36 pm
@MonaLeeza,
Thanks ML and BFN for your ideas.

I was actually thinking of going to our family doctor as well, and asking if perhaps my mother should be tested / reviewed by a gerontologist to see how she really is, and if there are any problems that should dealt with.
margo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 08:42 pm
@Reyn,
Reyn wrote:

I was actually thinking of going to our family doctor as well, and asking if perhaps my mother should be tested / reviewed by a gerontologist to see how she really is, and if there are any problems that should dealt with.


That's a sensible thing to do, in any case.
0 Replies
 
Chumly
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2010 09:23 pm
The amount of stress I'm under has a definitive effect on how well I remember, as does the amount of sleep I've had.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Which is more important, memory or brain? - Question by Rickoshay75
Music and Memory - Question by Roberta
what is memory? - Discussion by Icemana5
Tape Recorder Head - Discussion by Joeblow
Reverse deja vu?? - Question by kirasarahhx
Anyone here remember Rosemary? - Discussion by izzythepush
Have I been discriminated against? - Question by duffy1807
 
  1. Forums
  2. » What techniques or tricks do you use to remember forgotten names, titles, words, and concepts?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/19/2021 at 04:14:59