6
   

Is there scientific evidence of the effect of different alcohols on the brain?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 12:20 am
@cicerone imposter,
It's an old speciality of a certain region (around the town of Celle/Lower Saxony). The originally distillery has now been sold to a larger company (close to where I live), but its still produced. (Long ago, Ratzeputz was sold in a very higher percentage only.)
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 03:10 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
Do you know why some say you shouldn't mix beer with wine or the hard stuff with wine?


No, CI--i know that people claim that's a bad idea, but i know of no objective reason why this should be so.

Every form of potable alcohol produced by traditional methods (i.e., not produced commercially for industrial use) has naturally occuring denaturants which are by-products of the process, or residues of the original sources of the alcohol. Beers and ales have malted, fermented barley as the sugar source for the alcohol; wine, of course, has fermented grapes; more potent forms are distilled from the original form, such as brandy from wine--or they are distilled from an essentially unpalatable form, such as bourbon whiskey distilled from corn mash.

These naturally occuring denaturants are what are thought to give the effect of each type of alcoholic beverage its individual effect (and hangover). I suspect that mixing them simply dumps a lot more and different kinds of those potent chemicals--the denaturants--into your belly, with predictable results.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:23 am
@Setanta,
I was watching an NPR thing about moonshining and how the moonshiner ( a Little Guy nameof "Popcorn") would proof his load. He3d cut it from 180% alcohol (ethanol and propanol which are effectively the solubility limits of alcohol in air or else it merely sucks water out of the air and requires drying agents to get a higher proof "Shine").

They would cut the proof by adding spring water until the bubbles resulting from shaking, dont disappear so quickly (Apparently 100 proof is the desired alcohol level for shine). However, the 2 propanol (isopropyl alcohol) that is produced and transferred into the liquor is a function of high proof shine. SO were your alcohol made from a distillation process that was a high proof (like vodka or tequila) then you ould have a measurable amount of isopropyl alcohol in your likker.

Isopropyl is commercially produced by a bucket method with sulfuric acid and propene but it also is poroduced as a late end distillate from the production of ethanol. ASO, were I a drinkin man, Id stay away from anything with a really high proof or a likker that is naturally proofed at a reading of near 100 or higher.

Isopropyl acohol , while not deadly as methanol, is much more easily metabolized into acetone than is ethanol, and acetone has some severe liver reactions should one try an excly=usive diet of high proof alcohols.

0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 11:20 am
@Setanta,
Thanks, Set. That's what I believed, but with so many repeating those mixing prohibitions, it has become somewhat of a folklore for some drinkers. I, personally, never had such problems.
0 Replies
 
ibstubro
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Sep, 2010 09:09 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I think a switch to tequila for a minute will bring you appreciation of vodka or not?
0 Replies
 
 

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