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Jimmy Carter sent on A Hostage Run

 
 
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 02:43 am
Quote:
CNN) -- Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter arrived in North Korea Wednesday to negotiate the release of an American held there.

Carter was greeted at the airport by the country's vice minister for foreign affairs, the communist nation's official news agency said.

The trip is intended to secure the release of Aijalon Mahli Gomes, a 31-year-old Boston, Massachusetts, resident.

Gomes was sentenced in April to eight years at a hard labor camp for illegally crossing North Korea's border with China and for an unspecified "hostile act."

Carter travelled in his capacity as a private citizen, senior administration officials told CNN earlier. They added Carter had contacted the administration of President Barack Obama about the mission.

One of the senior officials said Carter "will not be carrying any message on behalf of the United States government."

Thaleia Schlesinger, a spokesman for Gomes' family, offered no comment on Carter's trip to North Korea.

"We are grateful to the government of North Korea for the medical care Aijalon Mahli Gomes has received," she said. "We are requesting the government of North Korea grant him amnesty and allow him to return home on humanitarian grounds."

KCNA reported in July that Gomes had tried to commit suicide and was hospitalized.

Two American journalists -- Laura Ling and Euna Lee, who had crossed the border into North Korea in March 2009 and were arrested and sentenced to 12 years hard labor -- were released in August after an intervention by former U.S. President Bill Clinton.
http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/08/25/north.korea.carter.trip/index.html?hpt=C1 A Bush is next up, wonder which one?? The North Koreans are pretty cunning though, they have to know that Carter is a joke in America. I half expect them to stiff him, this after they had made the customary promise that all he had to do was show up to collect the American. They love to toy with us.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 9 • Views: 8,209 • Replies: 120

 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 05:46 am
@hawkeye10,
Jimmy Carter is far from a joke in America except for conservative idiots who ironically are a joke for the rest of us.

Many of us have a deep respect for the man.
CoastalRat
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 09:03 am
@maxdancona,
As a conservative, and I'm sure to some around here an idiot as well, I respect former president Carter for all his work with Habitat for Humanity. I just wish he would stay the hell away from the political arena where he is quite frankly a joke, regardless of how that may make me appear to the non-conservatives on here.
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 09:36 am
@CoastalRat,
Jimmy Carter was one of the few people who actually lived up to what he believed. He was a professing Christian in every aspect of his life and he lived the most positive parts of his faith in his life.

His work with Habitat for Humanity is one example of living according to the best parts of faith, taking care of the poor and needy.

His political advocacy is another-- in every aspect of his political life he has stood for compassion, forgiveness and love for enemies. His politics are right out of the Sermon on the Mount. I respect his integrity. Very few people live lives that match their professed faith.

Blessed are the Peacemakers.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 09:45 am
@CoastalRat,
Let me say this another way CostalRat. It is fine to disagree with the man-- but to discount him as "quite frankly a joke" is ridiculous.

Are you so disparaging to everyone you disagree with?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 10:17 am
@CoastalRat,
Quote:
I just wish he would stay the hell away from the political arena where he is quite frankly a joke,


Why might that be, CR? Because he tells the truth [mostly] about what America is. Example: the stingiest country on the planet; he corrected that lying piece of scum, Bolton who accused Cuba of terrorist activities. That's gotta be the joke of the century eh, Bolton accusing others of terrorism.

Maybe it would be better to send little George.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 10:22 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Jimmy Carter sent on A Hostage Run


Your reading skills need some work, Hawk.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 01:13 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Your reading skills need some work, Hawk.
I dont go by just what I read, I for instance also know something of history. The procedure has become SOP....Arrest Americans, sentence them to harsh penalties in a kangaroo court, and then tell the Americans if they will send an approved person of importance to ask for their release said person of importance can collect them and take them home. We do it because we are too much afflicted with the "if it saves just one life" malady, and they do it because the get to advertise that America is so weak that they can be made to grovel. Each time we Americans do this we encourage the next taking of an American, so it is not in our interest to play this game, but we do it anyways.

I think we have done this game not only with North Korea, but also with Iran and libya....and there are probably others that I dont remember.
realjohnboy
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 01:18 pm
This is a prearranged done deal. Very similar to Bill Clinton collecting the two journalists a few months ago. They like this guy illegally entered North Korea.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 01:28 pm
@realjohnboy,
Quote:
This is a prearranged done deal
Please.........how many times have we seen the North Koreans do a deal, and then rip it up? It happens ALL THE TIME. Carter is the perfect person to stiff. Or to at least refuse to hand over the hostage at the agreed time and make Carter cool his heals in North Korea for a few days just to drive home who is in charge. Carter is a softy with no sense, he would wait like a good boy.

This story is better than TV for entertainment value.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 01:48 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Carter was expected to return to the U.S. on Thursday with Gomes, the senior U.S. official in Washington said.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100825/ap_on_re_as/as_nkorea_carter

This was a bad move for Team Obama, because having advertised the promised schedule there is now no way to play down the North Koreans humiliating Carter, should they choose to do it.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 02:03 pm
@CoastalRat,
Exactly. I consider Jimmy Carter to be the finest ex - president we've ever had. I hope the 'ex' was adequately emphasized.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 02:10 pm
It is 5am in Pyongyang, the show should start in a few hours. Now all I need is to figure out how to get one of those popcorn eating Emoticons.....
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  3  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 02:25 pm
@roger,
Carter was the most decent human being ever to be president. This is support for my theory someone with integrity and decency shouldn't be allowed anywhere near the White House.


ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 02:28 pm
@realjohnboy,
realjohnboy wrote:

This is a prearranged done deal. Very similar to Bill Clinton collecting the two journalists a few months ago. They like this guy illegally entered North Korea.


yup, worked like a charm that time round
I'm sure hoping this does as well
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 03:03 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
yup, worked like a charm that time round
The North Koreans pulling this stunt so soon after the last time proves the opposite.....there is a good reason why one should never negotiate with terrorists and bullies. How one responds to such people and nations separates the wise from the not wise.
maxdancona
 
  3  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 03:37 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
there is a good reason why one should never negotiate with terrorists and bullies. How one responds to such people and nations separates the wise from the not wise.


Give me an example of a country that has a "never negotiate with terrorists and bullies" policy that isn't stuck in a very long, very costly and unwinnable military morass.

Such simplistic he-man thinking might make you feel good, but in real life it doesn't have a very good track record.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 04:03 pm
@maxdancona,
I concede the possibility that you might be right. Horrible thought, isn't it?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:43 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
I dont go by just what I read, I for instance also know something of history.


You don't expect anyone to believe that that bullshit you're fed constitutes history, do you? The propaganda reels off your tongue like it was original source.

Actually, there are a group of Cubans, five, I believe who were "tried" and convicted in one of them there kangaroo courts you talk about. And you talk of "harsh penalties". How does 3 life sentences and 30 years and 19 years sound for doing the job that your own law enforcement fails to do?

Quote:

Media Disinformation: The Cuban Five and the Assassination of Fabio di Celmo: Washington’s Double Standards

by Arnold August


The five Cubans were sent to south Florida in the 1990s in order to infiltrate terrorist organisations operating for decades with impunity against Cuba from that area in the USA. Over 3,000 Cubans were killed and 2,000 seriously maimed by terrorists activities in Cuba since the revolution of January 1, 1959. The Cuban authorities have continuously pressed upon Washington to stop this action emanating from their territory, but to no avail. The only choice open to Cuba was to gather the information and provide it to the US authorities so that action is taken against those responsible. This is what the five Cuban citizens did. However, when all the evidence was presented to the FBI representatives in Havana, instead of arresting the perpetrators of these crimes, they arrested the five Cubans.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=18635



If a North Korean illegally entered the US there would be kangaroos sitting on the bench and making up the jury.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:54 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
If a North Korean illegally entered the US there would be kangaroos sitting on the bench and making up the jury
How about we stick a little more closer to the primary subject?

Quote:

White House jitters?
Mr. Carter is in Pyongyang seeking the release of American Aijalon Mahli Gomes, a one-time English teacher in South Korea who was sentenced to eight years in prison for entering the country illegally. The case is reminiscent of that of two US journalists, Euna Lee and Laura Ling, whose release Mr. Clinton secured last year.

Before his mission, Clinton was asked by the Obama administration to stick to the two journalists’ plight and avoid straying into broader US-North Korea issues. By all accounts he did just that – influenced in part, some observers speculated, by the fact that his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, is secretary of State.

But he also might have undertaken his mission with still-vivid memories of how, in 1994, Carter went beyond his mandate when the Clinton administration sent him to North Korea, say some foreign-policy experts who served under Clinton.

Clinton sent Carter to North Korea at the height of a tense standoff over the North’s nuclear developments. Carter ended up negotiating the terms of a settlement with North Korea, but in the process he burned bridges with the Clinton White House, officials later said, and solidified a reputation for acting as an independent peacemaker.

It’s that reputation that is causing a few jitters in the White House, according to some reports, as Carter negotiates in Pyongyang.

North Korea's high hopes
The North Koreans appeared to be making it clear they hope to use Carter’s visit for more than an eventual goodwill gesture, having sent their negotiator for the six-party talks, Kim Gye-Gwan, to greet Carter at the airport.

“Even if [Carter] doesn’t go off track, there’s still the danger it will be interpreted or used to undermine the current US policy,” says Mr. Klingner.

The Obama administration is expected to announce new sanctions against North Korea in the coming weeks, hoping to pressure Pyongyang to look at nuclear talks within an international framework, and not as a purely US-North Korea issue.

While it’s hard to argue with any effort to release US citizens facing harsh sentences under questionable circumstances, Klingner says, the US also has to consider the impact such high-profile missions have on North Korea’s behavior.

“It tends to indicate to the North Koreans that they can bypass normal diplomatic channels” and dominate the limelight by drawing in “high-profile Americans,” he says. “They end up thinking it’s a sure way to further their objectives.”
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Foreign-Policy/2010/0825/Jimmy-Carter-Can-Obama-trust-him-in-North-Korea-talks

Given the history of both North Korean and Jimmy Carter behaviour the White House Damn well should be jittery.
 

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