6
   

The human brain is not part of of the natural organism

 
 
Alrenous
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Sep, 2010 10:16 pm
@Setanta,
I choose not to read, because I'm not going to respond.
I stand by my decision to end the flame war.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 08:50 am
@Arjuna,
Your answers are like religious people. You can make statements, but fail to provide the evidence needed to back up what you say.
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 09:01 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

Your answers are like religious people. You can make statements, but fail to provide the evidence needed to back up what you say.
I have to agree.
0 Replies
 
Arjuna
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 09:35 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

Your answers are like religious people. You can make statements, but fail to provide the evidence needed to back up what you say.
I'm not sure what you're talking about little dude.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 09:58 am
@Arjuna,
For one, I'm not "dude." For another, you make claims from reading one book, and think you're an expert on the subject. Lastly, we expect contemporary scientists who have studied the earth's climate to support what you claim. Haven't seen any. Your saying something is garbage in and of itself. You need to provide evidence. It's as simple as that, dude.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:11 am
@cicerone imposter,
@Setanta,
I wonder how the females lived through birthing with such larger brains?


CI, I asked my question to Setanta because I wondered if large brains could have participated in the demise of the Neanderthals and Cro Magnons? If the mothers and their babies died at birth, the number of females to procreate would be widely dimished. Could this have led to the end of those large-headed humans?

BBB
0 Replies
 
Arjuna
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 10:31 am
@cicerone imposter,
My friend, what I told you about the earth's climate has been understood for at least 20 years. It's called historical geography. You could have easily followed my advice and read the wikipedia article on ice ages. It's obvious that you didn't read it and that you know next to nothing about climatology. Yet you insult other people. That's just not cool.

There are plenty of good books that explain climatology in simple terms. At this point I think the one I mentioned would be too advanced for you. I have no doubt that you could begin to understand the topic if you really wanted to. Until then... do yourself a favor and withhold condemning statements.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 11:13 am
@Arjuna,
This is from Wiki. None of this info confirms your claims.
From your post two pages ago on this thread:
Quote:
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:


We also know that this planet has gone through two ice ages, and that this planet is some 4.5 billion years old.

If you're talking about great ice ages, there've been three in the last 500 million years. We're in one now.

What he said was pretty much true, though. It's difficult at this point to study a biosphere that hasn't been affected by humans.


Quote:
Physical evidence for climatic change

Evidence for climatic change is taken from a variety of sources that can be used to reconstruct past climates. Reasonably complete global records of surface temperature are available beginning from the mid-late 1800s. For earlier periods, most of the evidence is indirect—climatic changes are inferred from changes in proxies, indicators that reflect climate, such as vegetation, ice cores,[29] dendrochronology, sea level change, and glacial geology.
Historical and archaeological evidence
Main article: Historical impacts of climate change

Climate change in the recent past may be detected by corresponding changes in settlement and agricultural patterns.[30] Archaeological evidence, oral history and historical documents can offer insights into past changes in the climate. Climate change effects have been linked to the collapse of various civilisations.[30]
Glaciers
Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 450,000 years
Decline in thickness of glaciers worldwide

Glaciers are considered among the most sensitive indicators of climate change,[31] advancing when climate cools and retreating when climate warms. Glaciers grow and shrink, both contributing to natural variability and amplifying externally forced changes. A world glacier inventory has been compiled since the 1970s, initially based mainly on aerial photographs and maps but now relying more on satellites. This compilation tracks more than 100,000 glaciers covering a total area of approximately 240,000 km2, and preliminary estimates indicate that the remaining ice cover is around 445,000 km2. The World Glacier Monitoring Service collects data annually on glacier retreat and glacier mass balance From this data, glaciers worldwide have been found to be shrinking significantly, with strong glacier retreats in the 1940s, stable or growing conditions during the 1920s and 1970s, and again retreating from the mid 1980s to present.[32]

The most significant climate processes since the middle to late Pliocene (approximately 3 million years ago) are the glacial and interglacial cycles. The present interglacial period (the Holocene) has lasted about 11,700 years.[33] Shaped by orbital variations, responses such as the rise and fall of continental ice sheets and significant sea-level changes helped create the climate. Other changes, including Heinrich events, Dansgaard–Oeschger events and the Younger Dryas, however, illustrate how glacial variations may also influence climate without the orbital forcing.

Glaciers leave behind moraines that contain a wealth of material—including organic matter, quartz, and potassium that may be dated—recording the periods in which a glacier advanced and retreated. Similarly, by tephrochronological techniques, the lack of glacier cover can be identified by the presence of soil or volcanic tephra horizons whose date of deposit may also be ascertained.
Vegetation

A change in the type, distribution and coverage of vegetation may occur given a change in the climate; this much is obvious. In any given scenario, a mild change in climate may result in increased precipitation and warmth, resulting in improved plant growth and the subsequent sequestration of airborne CO2. Larger, faster or more radical changes, however, may well[weasel words] result in vegetation stress, rapid plant loss and desertification in certain circumstances.[34]
Ice cores

Analysis of ice in a core drilled from a ice sheet such as the Antarctic ice sheet, can be used to show a link between temperature and global sea level variations. The air trapped in bubbles in the ice can also reveal the CO2 variations of the atmosphere from the distant past, well before modern environmental influences. The study of these ice cores has been a significant indicator of the changes in CO2 over many millennia, and continues to provide valuable information about the differences between ancient and modern atmospheric conditions.
Dendroclimatology

Dendroclimatology is the analysis of tree ring growth patterns to determine past climate variations. Wide and thick rings indicate a fertile, well-watered growing period, whilst thin, narrow rings indicate a time of lower rainfall and less-than-ideal growing conditions.
Pollen analysis

Palynology is the study of contemporary and fossil palynomorphs, including pollen. Palynology is used to infer the geographical distribution of plant species, which vary under different climate conditions. Different groups of plants have pollen with distinctive shapes and surface textures, and since the outer surface of pollen is composed of a very resilient material, they resist decay. Changes in the type of pollen found in different layers of sediment in lakes, bogs, or river deltas indicate changes in plant communities. These changes are often a sign of a changing climate.[35][36] As an example, palynological studies have been used to track changing vegetation patterns throughout the Quaternary glaciations[37] and especially since the last glacial maximum.[38]
Insects

Remains of beetles are common in freshwater and land sediments. Different species of beetles tend to be found under different climatic conditions. Given the extensive lineage of beetles whose genetic makeup has not altered significantly over the millennia, knowledge of the present climatic range of the different species, and the age of the sediments in which remains are found, past climatic conditions may be inferred.[39]
Sea level change
Main articles: Sea level and Current sea level rise

Global sea level change for much of the last century has generally been estimated using tide gauge measurements collated over long periods of time to give a long-term average. More recently, altimeter measurements — in combination with accurately determined satellite orbits — have provided an improved measurement of global sea level change.[40] To measure sea levels prior to instrumental measurements, scientists have dated coral reefs that grow near the surface of the ocean, coastal sediments, and nearshore archaeological remains.
Arjuna
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Sep, 2010 11:15 am
@cicerone imposter,
Which claim?
0 Replies
 
manono
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 02:24 am
@cicerone imposter,
I know about all that ( 'human' migration, ice ages).

With the extensive trails of elephants I mean something completely different.

Imagine that cities en roads would be build in the Serengeti. The migration of gnoes, zebra's, antilopes would be disturbed. I'm shure that these animals would change their behaviour in one way or another. Also the predators would change. The disturbed balance caused by humans can then result in een population boom of one of the species involved. That's the only thing I want to say in response to the elephant population boom mentioned above by Arjuena.

Massai and other tribes were chased from their territory because it became a natural park gestured by 'whites'. They were going to protect nature. How can they protect nature better than those tribes whose way of living is completely in balance with that nature. Those tribes have lived there for thousands of years without disturbing anything. The intellectual white arrives and suddenly the nomadic tribes have to move.
Fortunately some 'wisdom' has dawned on some of these natural gamekeepers: in some natural parks the locals are permitted to live within the natural park and to hunt (quota's are set). These locals also prevent in a significant way poaching. If you ask me, what a long way to come to that insight.
To me, this is one of so many facts that indicate that the modern man with his GSM, pc, and magnetron meals is not part of nature and doesn't understand anything of it. To me the human brain is an anomaly in nature.

I said already that I'm not academically schooled. Perhaps that is not such a great loss. If I would be, I would probably have adopted the universal way of thinking of scholars (methodology). But I admit, it is also a weak point.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 03:08 am
@Alrenous,
Apparently, your definition of "flame war" is someone disagreeing with you.
0 Replies
 
manono
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2010 11:38 am
@cicerone imposter,
I'm late , I'm sorry.

'Cannibalistic' and 'suicidal'... are terms applicable on homo sapiens. When we become cannibalistic or commit suicide, we don't procreate and on top of it, we do have a very sensitive nervous system. In our case it only means that circumstances of living are very bad.
Spiders don't have a sensitive nervous system, they don't feel pain and can't even think about it. The eaten male is probably food for the female to lay eggs of excellent quality.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2010 12:19 pm
@manono,
man, I agree with your observation, because you include all of what is natural in nature.
0 Replies
 
manono
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jan, 2012 09:32 am
@rosborne979,
We only know a LOT about what we want to know and in function of what is already known. What we want to know mostly stays within a boundary of thinking systems that are influenced by local culture, local religion, local politics, local economy systems or ideologies.. . And with 'local' I don't mean the shop around the corner, but nations like the USA, continents like Europe, Africa, Asia.
From the point of view of nature these continents and sub divisions within these continents are 'local'.

Don't worry about me, I'm rethinking many perspectives on many things all the time.
0 Replies
 
 

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