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This is disturbing. A big issue which every one of us should ponder over

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 07:25 am
This is disturbing. Not long since my biggest fear was death. Death was dreadful in my mind,this dread fully occupied my mind so my life was completely driven by the aim of how to avoid or postpone death. I am in my twenties and I have no any disease to date. But I fear that I I may die 70 years later or 80 years later. I fear that day may eventually come one day. I can't help crying when I'm writing this.

However, I find that my fear is unconsciously declining over time, maybe my fear is distracted by various problems or pressure in real life. They are right before my eyes so I have to deal with them anyway. However, I gradually become insensitive to death. I am losing my instinctive fear towards death. How terrible!

When you are accepting or even anticipate death, then death will gradually become a certain event that will happen to you.

Ok. You may retort, "Is there any person who is undying in this world up to now?" No, there is no person who is undying in this world so far. But that doesn't mean being undying is impossible. Five hundred years ago we might think that flying in the sky was impossible, but we invented airplane four hundred years later. Two hundred years ago, we might think that creating "another you" was impossible, but now we know by tapping the human cloning technology, this becomes possible. So how can you say or prove that being undying is impossible within the next decades?

Only when you accept death, only when you think/believe "death is unavoidable" then death becomes unavoidable.

My fear towards death is declining when I live in this earthly world, so is my effort, my effort to prepare to avoid or postpone death. How terrible! How miserable! How pathetic! How dreadful!

What's in your mind now? Do you have any constructive ideas or cognition?
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,533 • Replies: 16
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HexHammer
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 10:14 am
@stevenya,
stevenya wrote:
What's in your mind now? Do you have any constructive ideas or cognition?
My mind is filled with thoughts about you going to therapy, you sounds very skitzo!
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 10:36 am
@stevenya,
This topic has been discussed several times on A2K.

Besides religious palliatives, there are "answers" from the study of consciousness which suggest that the concept of "self" is transitory and illusory.
IMO, a particular good (therapeutic) book on these matters is Reanny's "The Death of Forever".

In the meantime, remember that "the self" dies every night during dreamless sleep, and even in dreams it is hardly "coherent"!

NB: You are not "schizo". Dread of death is extremely common.
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GoshisDead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 11:13 am
@stevenya,
If you attempt to analyze what makes you you, you will find that either you can't, or that everything that makes you you is already ephemeral and in constant fluxuation. You aren't the same person from one moment to the next. The you who you think you are may simply be a bundle of adopted ideas and groups of adoptive people. You may find that aside from the animal urge for self preservation that it would be more fearful to lose those who have adopted you and provided the terms for your ideology to die than for you to die. Without them you cannot be the you that you are, although you may think that you could still be the the you that you think you are.
Zetherin
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 12:38 pm
stevenya wrote:
My fear towards death is declining when I live in this earthly world, so is my effort, my effort to prepare to avoid or postpone death. How terrible! How miserable! How pathetic! How dreadful!

No, no, don't fret - keep fearing death. Any anti-aging serum or otherwise preventive death measure won't see the light for quite some time, and definitely not before you're dead.
stevenya wrote:
Only when you accept death, only when you think/believe "death is unavoidable" then death becomes unavoidable.

Well that's certainly false. I don't know why you'd type that. Poor guy.
0 Replies
 
kuvasz
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 01:45 pm
@stevenya,
death is easy, its living that is hard.
Pronounce
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 02:52 pm
@GoshisDead,
I think this post could be confusing for some, but either fortunately, or unfortunately, I totally get what you're saying.
Pronounce
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 02:56 pm
@stevenya,
I know one cure for this feeling is to work with hospice. If that isn't something you're interested in then just seeking out others who are suffering will help you get out of your head and into your heart. You're much more likely to find peace there.
0 Replies
 
GoshisDead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 03:16 pm
@Pronounce,
I tend to be confusing, say some.
Zetherin
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 05:53 pm
@GoshisDead,
Yes, some of your posts tend to be confusing, but I've learned not to ignore them since I find you to be an intelligent poster.

Goshisdead wrote:
If you attempt to analyze what makes you you, you will find that either you can't, or that everything that makes you you is already ephemeral and in constant fluxuation. You aren't the same person from one moment to the next. The you who you think you are may simply be a bundle of adopted ideas and groups of adoptive people. You may find that aside from the animal urge for self preservation that it would be more fearful to lose those who have adopted you and provided the terms for your ideology to die than for you to die. Without them you cannot be the you that you are, although you may think that you could still be the the you that you think you are.

So, because everyone, whether it be mentally or physically, is in a state of flux (if only minuscule changes), you believe people can't maintain an identity? I find that to be demonstrably false. I suppose we would have to get into primary and secondary properties again, but I do believe that though we are not identical from one moment to another, we can still maintain identity.

Do you honestly believe that if you clip your toenails this evening, you will become a different person?
Sentience
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 06:04 pm
Immortality is impossible on so many levels it's not even feasible. At best we could (theoretically) postpone death by hundreds of thousands if not millions of years, and even that may be biologically and mathematically impossible. Rather than cling to false ideals, you should attempt to deal with your fear of death.
GoshisDead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 06:06 pm
@Zetherin,
Yes technically we are the sum of our experiences, it does not take a dramatic or traumatic experience to change who we are. I'm not saying you will become a communist because you took a bath, although that is not impossible. I saying that we are in constant flux because of our interaction with experience. Dipping my toes in water tonight may affect all future events concerning toes, water, cleanliness etc... those events affected may quite literally change my ideals about those issues my attitudes change so do the people with whom I associate who provide new ideas which create new ideals etc...

I'm also saying who we are is not necessarily who we think we are. an Ideology is based on ideals not practices. We practice rationalizations of ideals. In this way we avoid cognitive dissonance between our actions and our ideals. The practice of the rationalization of new ideals often starts well before comprehension of us having new ideals.
0 Replies
 
Zetherin
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 06:09 pm
@Sentience,
Sentience wrote:

Immortality is impossible on so many levels it's not even feasible. At best we could (theoretically) postpone death by hundreds of thousands if not millions of years, and even that may be biologically and mathematically impossible. Rather than cling to false ideals, you should attempt to deal with your fear of death.

Yes, well, it seems that the less biological matter in one's body, the higher the chance of the person living longer (this is yet to be proven, but I think scientists are on to something). I am very interested to see how cybernetics progresses in the coming years. Once we start installing mechanisms on a large-scale that break down at a much slower rate than biological matter, things will get interesting. Instead of going to the doctor, we'll go in for repairs Smile
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 06:58 pm
@stevenya,
Hi Stevenya!

That's a cool name, by the way!

There is no such thing as death! You are not schizophrenic (Hex thinks everyone but he is.)

Everything is immortal! Energy is eternal and cannot cease to be.

Have a glorious day!
Mark...
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 08:04 pm
@kuvasz,
I would say you are correct in the case of over 90% of the people living.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2010 09:38 pm
Twenty year olds think the world revolves around them. They usually do fear death. Maybe because life is so scary to them.
CactusHeart
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Aug, 2010 12:58 pm
@PUNKEY,
20 y.o.'s...By that you're probably referring to young adults/teenagers category, and no most don't fear death, because oftentimes it's the furthest thing from their minds. You know the old stereotype "those types act like they're invincible". Most stereotypes are around for a reason: they're self-perpetuated. But I digress.

I think that the author of this topic is a little misguided. Acceptance of mortality is very healthy, so long as it doesn't go as far as causing indifference to one's own life("oh well, who cares? I'm dying anyway."). Is that person really believing that we SHOULD be afraid of facing our own demise? And what's the reason for reinstating this fear? I don't see it doing any good to anyone, least of all things life extention (and besides, I'm much more a "quality over quantity" type anyway *lol*. What good are extra years if they're wasted on fear?). I've seen (and read about) more than my share of people not only dying despite their fear of it, but dying in the very manner their worst nightmares, phobias and imaginings illustrated. For example, a claustrophobe's body recovered from being locked in a dark, small enclosed area. A person afraid of heights falling to their death. ONE example in particular really stood out for me...you want to talk about "power of the mind"? One guy worked on freight trains and his biggest terrifying fear were the refrigerated freight cars. His fear of being locked inside and freezing to death was so strong, it bordered irrational. Everyone that knew him knew about his fear. Well, one day, it happened. He got locked inside one of the refrigerated cars as the train was leaving for an overnight trip. His body was found at the destination. Autopsy indicated that he died of freezing to death...But HERE'S the TWIST: the refrigeration WASN'T TURNED ON! The power of his mind combined with his fear and ALL IT'S STRENGTH, when misused (as in this case), worked against him and took his life. If he hadn't have been gripped by the terror of dying (and the manner of which he'd die), he would've just missed a day of work *lol*.

Maybe the route to take is the view that mortality SHOULD be accepted...but seen as an option of whether or not to participate *lol*. Sticking your fingers in your ears and going "la-la-la" over the facts is about as blockheaded as living in fear over it.
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