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What Would A Black-Hole Look Like From Behind, Below and above?

 
 
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 12:31 pm
What would, if proven to exist, a black-hole look like from the above views?

And why do they, seemingly, appear to face only one direction? shouldn't the forces be dimensionally symmetrical?

Thank you, and have a lovely day!
Mark...
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 4,903 • Replies: 19
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MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 01:52 pm
What makes you think they face only one direction? Obviously we can only observe them from one direction, but why do you assume it'd be different from somewhere else?
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MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 01:53 pm
Incidentally, the current thinking is that the heart of the Milky Way (our) galaxy is a giant black hole.
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 01:58 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:

What would, if proven to exist, a black-hole look like from the above views?
And why do they, seemingly, appear to face only one direction? shouldn't the forces be dimensionally symmetrical?

They do exist and they are symmetrical. (I'm not sure what you are referring to when you say otherwise. Perhaps you could give an example, if the information I'm including below doesn't help.)

However, when matter falls toward a black hole it acquires a rotational component just as with all other gravitational systems. It's possible to orbit a black hole just as it is for any other ordinary star.

As matter is accelerated toward the singularity it interacts and can (and does) release a lot of energy in the form of various radiation. These are what cause the jets at the poles of a black hole. The matter and energy ejected from these jets is prevented from reaching the event horizon, beyond which there would be no escape.
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mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 04:18 pm
@MontereyJack,
Hi Jack!
The current thinking is that there is a black hole at the centre of every galaxy. I concur. But we've yet to see one in action, unfortunately

Thank you Jack, your post is welcome indeed.
Have a great weekend.
Mark...
Krumple
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 04:32 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:
The current thinking is that there is a black hole at the center of every galaxy. I concur. But we've yet to see one in action, unfortunately.


Well "in action" is a little vague. The method we have currently used to determine if there is a black hole at the center of our galaxy is by observing stars that are close to it. By observing their moment, their orbit around an object we can not only determine the position of the black hole but we can calculate how much mass it has. So we know there is a super massive object at that point in the galaxy. Since it does not emit light the object can't actually be seen. So we took steps to point other types of telescopes at it to see if it is giving off any other kind of radiation. As it turns out there is several other types of radiation that are being emitted from that same location. So we have been observing a black hole in action.

On a side note, not only is there a super massive black hole at the center of the galaxy but there are thousands of smaller ones in our galaxy as well.

mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 04:47 pm
@Krumple,
Hi Krumple!

Are these smaller ones facing the same direction as the central one? Please.

Mark...
Krumple
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 04:52 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:

Hi Krumple!

Are these smaller ones facing the same direction as the central one? Please.



I don't know the answer to that. So are you theorizing that the spin has some significance? I don't think they all are spinning the same direction but I also don't know the answer.
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 04:59 pm
@mark noble,
They have spherical symmetry, barring any minor effects of rotation.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 05:04 pm
@Krumple,
Hi Krumple!

Yes. As eddys in a pool or fog. They must be sat in a substance or contained by a force. They are invisible to us because they are on a vertical horizon. We can only see the radiation emitted and never the halo of the event horizon. I assume?

Mark...
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 05:07 pm
@Brandon9000,
Hi Brandon!
nice to meet you.

Thank you for that. Would you say that the event horizon is rotating slower than the singularity itself, due to distance from said-to?

Have a great day, sir!
Mark...
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2010 05:19 pm
@mark noble,
I am curious as to which direction is up and which down in space. One can only view a black hole from above in relationship to the black hole.

There is no behind or below.
g day
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 07:06 pm
@parados,

The black hole itself - pitch black - your couldn't see it as it sucks in everything you'd like to use to observe it.

The black hole swallowing something, or moving between yourself and another light scource far away.

The first swallowing is common, not everything goes down, the crush as things rush in cause both intense radiation and collisions where a small fraction of the inflowing matter / energy collide and radiate outwards at very high veolicities and energy levels. These jets are very visible at long distance if you're in their way.

The second scenario causes gravational lensing and the dense matter warps space time. The illuminated object far behind it has its light bent like a fish eye lens and you get an expanded view of the object - or even multiple views of the same object in multiple places.
0 Replies
 
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jan, 2011 10:52 am
@parados,
parados wrote:

I am curious as to which direction is up and which down in space. One can only view a black hole from above in relationship to the black hole.

There is no behind or below.
Rubbish, Y and X axis would be relative to the galaxy.
0 Replies
 
spitnmagravy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Dec, 2012 04:15 pm
i have pondered on this same question.black holes are often described like whirpools in water.we picture a small boat rotating around its horizon until getting to the middle and crushed.so if this is the same shape as a black hole,why couldnt you come at it from behind.or underneath.like a whirlpool in water.if you was under the wayer couldnt you set a ways back and see this funnel which sucked the boat in,but far enough away that you weren't drawn in.i have never read about black holes sucking stuff in from every direction.but if they exist as such then they would be compacting matter in one spot in space for eternity.i think most people picture them as this funnel object because it helps them to think all that matter goes somewhere which makes it more understandable to a human mind.if we picture it as a funnel like a whirlpool then this funnel could expand outwards into space as it collects all this matter.if we envision it as collecting this matter from every direction into one singular point.then it becomes more mind boggling,so i dont think most see black holes this way.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2013 05:44 pm
@spitnmagravy,
I really cannot, with or without the usage of functional physical limitations, perceive ANY force that can absorb energy from all directions simultaneously, and, other than STORE, dispel said energy.

Hence the queery.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2013 08:11 pm
@mark noble,
Black Holes, just like every other gravitational object, are basically gravitationally symmetrical. However, there are other physical forces at play which cause "disks" to form around large gravitational wells (regular stars as well as Black Holes are both examples).

These "disks" may be giving you the impression that stars and Black Holes are more powerful gravitationally at the disk edge, but they are not.

Black Holes are known to spin, so they usually have "poles" and "equators", but unless the forces of Frame Dragging are included in the effects of Gravity, then the gravitational field would be completely symmetrical. And I really don't know the details of Frame Dragging as relates to Gravity and Black Holes. Frame Dragging is still a big mystery to me. It's one of the few things in Cosmological Physics which I don't have a relatively clear understanding of, so I can't help much if this comes down to questions of Frame Dragging.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2013 08:35 pm
@rosborne979,
Initially, upon formation, I agree.
But, using our own galaxy (spiral, yet flat, equatorially) as an example, we clearly see a funnel-effect in play.
This, being parallel to the 'event horizon', throws gravitational symmetry out the window.
Or do you perceive, for instance, material beneath the event being drawn to the upper horizon?
If so, the journey of such would be visible.
Zarathustra
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2013 08:48 pm
@mark noble,
What “funnel effect” are you talking about? I get the feeling it is the graphical representation of space-time being stretched by a black hole that you are equating to the surface of the black hole. If so, this “funnel” of space time geometry doesn’t change the shape of an object embedded in it any more than a suspended sheet sagging under the weight of a bowling ball changes the shape of the bowling ball.

It seems it would also help to know if by black hole one is discussing the event horizon or the singularity. However, both are (should be) symmetric about all axes.

Also spinning has very different consequences in relation to a black hole than to other astronomical objects. A non-spinning black hole has one event horizon and the singularity is always on the future world line. Simply by adding rotation the event horizon splits into two event horizons, the outer and inner (absolute) event horizons. In addition the singularity is no longer always on the world line for time-like trajectories.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jan, 2013 06:52 am
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:
But, using our own galaxy (spiral, yet flat, equatorially) as an example, we clearly see a funnel-effect in play.
I don't understand what you're calling a "funnel effect". Can you provide a more detailed example.
0 Replies
 
 

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