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Oz Election Thread #4 - Gillard's Labor

 
 
Bootlace
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 08:11 pm
A belated MERRY CHRISTMAS and a HAPPY NEW YEAR to all.
0 Replies
 
WendyLou
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 02:08 am
@Dutchy,
Dutchy!!!!!! I didn't know you'd been sick. Got your message on facebook re the Dr. Oz tablets.....sorry to hear you've been laid up. I'm not on here much lately because of Take 5 and That's Life. Lovatts has had a back burner space. I'm cranking up both now, but it's pretty time consuming. Obsessed by puzzles at the moment. Get better soon. Best wishes Wendy.
0 Replies
 
WendyLou
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 02:15 am
@msolga,
I think the eminent Austalians should turn their heads around, look forward and proceed forward. There is absolutely nothing we can do about the fact we went to war at this stage. Bear in mind Australia is in a very vulnerable position and we are after all an ally of the US. One day we may need them. It's all academic anyway, the rate of immigration of the Islamic community into Europe, UK, US and Australia is increasing and the rate of birth compared to western cultures is 8 to 1. Once a culture is out grown by population, the prevailing masses end up in power and will and can do pretty much what they like. Our future in 2040 or so, Sharia law in Australia and world wide, unless we do something to slow its progress right now. Western women should be very concerned for their future if they are below the age of 30 years. They will have no rights whatsoever, compared to the ones they currently enjoy, and should.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 02:47 pm
http://images.canberratimes.com.au/2013/01/08/3938547/JD-gal-pope-20130108211922704068-600x400.jpg
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 05:02 pm
I saw Keating 2 or 3 years ago saying that Howard wasted a decade of boom with 'a dead hand on the economy's steering wheel' (something like that) - pork barrelling the electorate rather than investing in the future (education/infrastructure/research)

Now an IMF report gives meat to the theory.

Hey, big spender: Howard the king of the loose purse strings

Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/opinion/political-news/hey-big-spender-howard-the-king-of-the-loose-purse-strings-20130110-2cj32.html#ixzz2HcGxYmFd

Economists were already on Tony's **** list - this won't help. Hockey denials are even funnier when you consider his grasp of economics is about as good as Tony's (and many Tony insiders have already said he doesn't have a clue or an interest).
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 09:08 pm
@hingehead,
I just can't bear to look at or listen to them....given they'll be in power in a few months....
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 10:20 pm
@dlowan,
The only thing I'm looking forward to with the LNP in power is the obfuscation over increased boat numbers courtesy of the withdrawal from Afghanistan. I for one will be constantly on their ass every time they use the excuse 'current circumstances' that they so blithely dismiss when the current government points to it.

I haven't given up yet. Some of their key platforms (actually they only have two - and I've already mentioned one) are looking ridiculous. Repeal the Carbon Tax in light of what's happened this summer and the gathering evidence will poison them amongs youth and/or thinkers - especially when their alternative is for all taxpayers to fund a scheme that rewards companies that do anything at all to reduce emissions. And I'm placing a great deal of faith in your gender Deb - at the next meeting you women have can you keep that preference gap building.

I've said it before but I'll say it again. The ALP has done some very stupid things, but for the life of me I can't see the LNP as an improvement - I wish it were different. Actual competition in ideas might improve the performance of both sides.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jan, 2013 07:08 pm
If the Oz says it's 8.6 then it must be at least 20% Wink
http://sphotos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/208252_10151229361668663_2014945255_n.jpg
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jan, 2013 05:55 am
@hingehead,
It's the Greens saying that, isn't it?

Woot if it's true!
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jan, 2013 03:59 pm
@dlowan,
I thought it was a greens poster of an Australian headline - but you're right it could just as likely be a greens ad published in the Australian. Will have to google it.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jan, 2013 04:38 pm
@hingehead,
I couln't find background either way but I did find this cool story from Crikey

What you won’t read in The Australian on climate change
by Cathy Alexander

http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/01/16/what-you-wont-read-in-the-australian-on-climate-change/?wpmp_switcher=mobile

You like the comments Deb.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Feb, 2013 02:15 am
A friend shared this on Facebook. Have no idea who Alan Austin is

Quote:
"There are two Australias. One is reasonably informed and knows the Rudd-Gillard period has had the lowest rate of ministerial sackings in the Westminster world since 1820, that the Australian economy is now healthier than it has ever been, that it is now the healthiest economy in the world by far, that taxes, interest rates and unemployment are lower now than during the Howard years, that the rate of deaths in the insulation industry during the stimulus implementation fell to a quarter of the rate of the Howard years, and that the only MP to be forced from Parliament as a result of criminal conduct in the current term is a Liberal. They know also that that the carbon tax is effectively reducing emissons and meets the spirit of the PM’s commitment “make no mistake - I am determined to put a price on carbon" if not with her preferred option. The other Australia believes the PM is a serial liar, that climate change is a hoax, Labor has destroyed Australia’s economy, the stimulus spending was a fiasco, that Peter Slipper is a Labor MP, and that ministerial resignations are rats deserting a sinking ship because that is what they are told to believe daily by Fairfax, Murdoch, the ABC and Macquarie Radio." --Alan Austin
0 Replies
 
Bootlace
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 07:33 pm
@WendyLou,
WendyLou wrote:

It's all academic anyway, the rate of immigration of the Islamic community into Europe, UK, US and Australia is increasing and the rate of birth compared to western cultures is 8 to 1. Once a culture is out grown by population, the prevailing masses end up in power and will and can do pretty much what they like. Our future in 2040 or so, Sharia law in Australia and world wide, unless we do something to slow its progress right now. Western women should be very concerned for their future if they are below the age of 30 years. They will have no rights whatsoever, compared to the ones they currently enjoy, and should.

Unfortunately some people can't or don't want to see the long term view with islamination of Australia. You will find you will probably get called a "RACIST" for objecting to the vile teachings and actions of that cult. Some can't differentiate between race and religion.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Mar, 2013 11:07 pm
@Bootlace,
The only way Australia will be 'islamised' is if the majority want it to be - I can't see a society that in the majority is fighting for legalised gay marriage (against the majority of it's elected officials) is going to accept any lessening of the rights of women.

Stop worrying about Islam and just keep worrying about human rights. Or as Don Gard used to say 'Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves'.
Bootlace
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Mar, 2013 01:01 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

The only way Australia will be 'islamised' is if the majority want it to be - I can't see a society that in the majority is fighting for legalised gay marriage (against the majority of it's elected officials) is going to accept any lessening of the rights of women.

Stop worrying about Islam and just keep worrying about human rights. Or as Don Gard used to say 'Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves'.

I would consider "looking after the pennies" would be to relegate islam in Australia to the dust bin where it belongs. It is totally incompatible with western laws and values.

Kabul debates women's law 'violating Sharia'

http://www.dw.de/kabul-debates-womens-law-violating-sharia/a-16658985
Australia will be heading in this direction in years to come.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Mar, 2013 02:43 pm
@Bootlace,
That's a pretty dumb assertion bootlace. On what do you base it? How would Australia get to the point Afghanistan is at right now? Racked by decades of civil war and with Islam being the dominant religion for centuries, not to mention its isolation, national income and widespread poverty. How would we acquire their lack of stable institutions? How would we uneducate our women? How would we shift our entire societal makeup?

As a futurist you suck dogs balls.

You're reasoning is as valid as me saying this

Mexico Drug War: Missing Persons Total At 26,121, Government Says

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/26/mexico-drug-war-missing-persons-total-26121_n_2767829.html
Australia will be heading in this direction in years to come

Do you see my point? I could link to any article and ad your comment and I'd be hard pressed to draw a longer bow.

I think it should be an Internet meme.

Unlike you I'll offer some reasoning:
We have the largest Islamic nation as one of our neighbours, they're not implementing sharia law.
Is it just part of their plan to trick us?
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Mar, 2013 06:25 pm
There is some hectic rumour milling that Abbott has weekly strategy meetings with News Ltd. Two people confirm that a senior press gallery person said it - if it's true I wouldn't be surprised - although my gut says it's unlikely unless Abbott is a complete moron (repetition and patterns make conspiracy easier to detect)

What is even sadder is that I can't imagine that, even it were proven, that it would be reported in the Murdoch press, or that it would change the minds of many Australians.

http://www.eraofthebiff.com/LU/abbott-26.jpg
0 Replies
 
Bootlace
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Mar, 2013 01:24 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

That's a pretty dumb assertion bootlace. On what do you base it? How would Australia get to the point Afghanistan is at right now? Racked by decades of civil war and with Islam being the dominant religion for centuries, not to mention its isolation, national income and widespread poverty. How would we acquire their lack of stable institutions? How would we uneducate our women? How would we shift our entire societal makeup?

As a futurist you suck dogs balls.


You won't see Australia as an islamic state in your lifetime, but it is heading in that direction. It's the creeping cancer that is slowly choking the world. The religion of peace, what a joke. To be a futurist, you need to get your head out of the sand and look around, look at history, you might learn something. You need to look further than dog's balls.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Mar, 2013 04:24 pm
@Bootlace,
Thanks for the clarification, I see that you have no evidence for your assertion. You're just batshit crazy. 'Look at history'? Wanna give me a hand and narrow that down a little?

I have to apologise for being rude, but that truly was one of the most pathetic attempts I've ever seen to support a theory on a2k. Or anywhere else come to think of it.

''because I said said so' would have had more intellectual rigour.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Mar, 2013 04:53 pm
Source: http://m.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/mar/21/australians-julia-gillard

Thursday 21 March 2013 18.00 GMT

Australians don't know how lucky they are
A leadership threat to Julia Gillard seemed churlish, given the strong economy – but disgruntled Australians are a common breed.

Paola Totaro

Last June, Australia celebrated its 21st. No, not a birthday or coming of age, but the completion of its 21st consecutive year of economic growth. Yup, you heard right, 21 years. Of growth. 21.

While the rest of the world lurches from crisis to economic crisis, the land of Oz is powering ahead, enjoying an Aussie dollar at a record high, unemployment at near-record lows (5.4%) and basking in more sunshine than the rest of us can dream up. So what does its Labor government do? Attempt suicide.

Yesterday's "coup" against Australia's Labor prime minister Julia Gillard by Kevin Rudd, the man she herself beat for the prime ministership in 2010, was the third failed attempt of her mandate. In the past 10 years, the Australian Labor party has installed and dispatched five national leaders while its nemesis, the Liberal party, has tried four different leaders in just six years.

Viewed from Europe, where national governments are planning to bail out their banks by raiding the savings accounts not just of Russian oligarchs but pensioners too, news of yet another political attack against Australia's leader smacks of a particular strain of antipodean madness. For decades, it is the British who have worn the "whingeing Poms" label. Now, it's time for Australians to accept the malcontents' mantle, because it is they who appear incapable of seeing just how lucky they are.

Complaint has become the national default position, seen in a political class – and a mainstream media – who spend more time slinging mud or knifing each other than debating and analysing national policy. No other advanced economy can come close to Australia's 21 years of growth. That period, a full generation, saw governments of both political flavours at the helm in Canberra, and is even more impressive when you remember that it spanned the dotcom boom (and bust), the crisis of 1997-1998 (remember that one?) and the global catastrophe that was the Lehman Brothers crash in 2008. Every single time, opposition parties (again of both persuasions) channelled Chicken Little, warning the sky would fall down in Australia. It didn't. It still hasn't.

Things are so damned good that the Reserve Bank is worried the strength of the national currency is harming national export markets. Aussie voters happily travel with more money in their pockets than ever before, and still they grouch about wavering national confidence, or rail against the couple of hundred sad souls who land illegally on their shores seeking asylum.

The world over, economists talk about "the Australian model". I've sat through enough press conferences in Europe to know that there are many learned bean counters who see this continent as a great example of just how to exploit and thrive in a tumultuous global environment where economic might is turning its eyes toward Asia.

There's a chorus of voices that argue that Australia's success is a role model not only for resource-rich emerging markets like Chile and Brazil but also for many other already developed nations navigating low growth and burgeoning unemployment.

Nobody would quibble with the reality that Australia has also been lucky, riding the back of a massive boom in global commodity markets – thank you China and your seemingly insatiable appetite for iron ore. Without doubt, Australia's bubble could burst if the Chinese market and global commodity prices were to crash.

But the fact is, Australia has shown resilience in the past – and this is largely due to good economic policy. Aussie banks have been managed conservatively; none have failed, no taxpayer bail-outs have been needed. There has been no Euro-style printing of money, no pushing of interest rates down to the historic lows we have seen in the UK. The Australian government, despite public brouhaha, has held its nerve, continuing to invest and stimulating the economy to keep it aloft. At 5.40%, the unemployment rate – one of the lowest in the industrialised world – is half that of Europe, never mind the horrendous 20% seen in Greece, Spain or Italy. And all the while, Australia's government debt has been chipped at: surpluses have been delivered and real money squirrelled away to tide the nation through bad times.

A government budgetary surplus of up to 2% of GDP? Surely, that in itself should deliver government on its own. But not in Oz. Instead, Labor allowed itself to be spooked by another bad opinion poll for Gillard, the epidemic of political dread fanned by a plethora of male radio shock jocks, and a largely hostile parliamentary commentariat. And once again, it turned to sharpening the knives.

There is, of course, one thing that's going badly in Oz. But at least the Australian cricket team is standing by their captain.

 

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