0
   

Red or Blue?

 
 
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2010 09:02 am
Which colour would you prefer - Red or Blue? Why? Do these colours inspire you? If so, what do they remind you of?

Please let me know. I would be very interested.

Have a nice day

  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 2,464 • Replies: 9
No top replies

 
aidan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2010 12:08 pm
@The Joker006,
I'm usually drawn to red as opposed to blue when it comes to clothes.
In flowers, I like blue, white or yellow moreso than red though.
On walls, I like red and certain shades of blue about equally.

Red feels warm to me - blue feels open and spacious to me.

Blue makes me think of the sea and sky and red makes me think of the sun.
0 Replies
 
james203
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2010 02:04 pm
Red i liked that color since i was young. Its something about it that attracts me to it.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2010 02:19 pm
@The Joker006,
The Joker006 wrote:

Which colour would you prefer - Red or Blue? Why? Do these colours inspire you? If so, what do they remind you of?

Please let me know. I would be very interested.

Have a nice day



How would you describe a colour to a blind man who has never seen?
Best wishes.
Mark...
stevecook172001
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2010 05:19 pm
@The Joker006,
Quote:
Which colour would you prefer - Red or Blue? Why? Do these colours inspire you? If so, what do they remind you of?

Please let me know. I would be very interested.

Have a nice day

Rh


Red = action

Blue = inaction

As for my preference. It depends on my state of mind.
0 Replies
 
The Joker006
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jun, 2010 07:38 am
@mark noble,
Hi Mark,

I would have so they associate the colors with things they can touch, taste, smell, hear... all the other senses they have. Example...
Blue = ice
White = cotton
Pink = sticky cotton candy
Red = Rose
Green = Grass
Yellow = The heat of the sun or simply the sun

A person just needs to use their imagination to come up with things to describe colors to those who cannot see them. What they can do is hear, smell, taste, and touch things in ways people who can see can never imagine.

Have a great day
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jun, 2010 07:51 am
How, exactly, will this allow a blind man to perceive 'Colour'? Telling them that 'ice' is 'blue' and making them touch it cannot evoke a visual reference to something that is inconceivable.
Did you take Jordan up on his offer?
I don't know how to tell if you, or any of us are active, at any given time - Do you?
Be brilliant, my friend.
Mark...
The Joker006
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jun, 2010 08:00 am
@mark noble,
Hi Mark,

I guess that blind people would have to use their imagination. Temperature would be a good way to associate a word to a colour. Yes, they are blind and describing a colour is virtually impossible. Beethoven once said:

"You can't describe color to a blind person because color is essentially how your eyes differentiate light that enters your eyes and gets transmitted as an image to your brain, if there has been a problem that had hindered this ability since birth the child will never be able to distinguish color unless by some miracle they gain sight in the future."

Have a great day
0 Replies
 
DarkFlame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 08:59 am
I would explain that everything operates at a frequency. Sound is a mixture of frequencies within the audible frequency range that can be heard - whether it's from the ultra low frequencies that only can be heard by whales or the ultra high frequencies that can only be heard by dogs, or even bats. But, even the ultra high frequencies that only bats can hear do not emit colors. It is only when the frequencies get so fast that they start emitting light, and consequently, colors. Each frequency is a different color - from the low ranges of infra-red to the high ranges of ultra-violet, and even into the range of x-rays. From there, the frequencies advance up the scale to the range of AM radio and then FM radio, and beyond. Each color has their own unique frequency by which the color is defined. But, the actual color that we "see" is nothing more than the frequencies being reflected by the object, and those frequencies are within the ranges that the brain interprets to be different colors.

So, with proper equipment, one who is blind would be able to tell if the frequency falls within the range defined to be a specific color. But, you still would not know how the color appeared any more than someone with no sense of smell/taste could distinguish how an apple tastes, or even distinguish that the purple bug juice tasted different than the red bug juice ... even when the color was the only difference.

~David Labens
San Antonio, TX
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2014 09:20 am
@DarkFlame,
Again - expecting a blind (from birth) person to associate with a visual reference is like expecting a person with no nerve-endings to comprehend pain, or a dead person to comprehend life.
TRY this - You don't understand my venusian language - Thus...
Klongrdes=tyholiujk
LPOkijhgf=Sxceweds
VeRgbkol'p=Bxcedxkil
Makes no sense, does it?
Because its comprehension is beyond your sentience.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Red or Blue?
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 07/16/2020 at 11:51:38